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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; SUPPORT ; incidence ; RISK ; RISKS ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; LYMPHOMA ; DESIGN ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; INDIVIDUALS ; PREVALENCE ; body mass index ; EPIC ; nutrition ; B-CELL LYMPHOMA ; FOLLICULAR LYMPHOMA ; RELATIVE RISK ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; BODIES ; multiple myeloma ; WEIGHT ; prospective studies ; HEIGHT ; methods ; diffuse large B-cell lymphoma ; SUBTYPES ; MASS ; prospective ; prospective study ; NOR ; B-CELL ; body mass ; RATIO ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; non-Hodgkin ; CONFIDENCE-INTERVALS
    Abstract: The incidences of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma are increasing steadily. It has been hypothesized that this may be due, in part, to the parallel rising prevalence of obesity. It is biologically plausible that anthropometric characteristics can infuence the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. DESIGN AND METHODS: In the context of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), anthropometric characteristics were assessed in 371,983 cancer-free individuals at baseline. During the 8.5 years of follow-up, 1,219 histologically confirmed incident cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma occurred in 609 men and 610 women. Gender-specific proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) of development of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma in relation to the anthropometric characteristics. RESULTS: Height was associated with overall non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma in women (RR 1.50, 95% CI 1.14-1.98) for highest versus lowest quartile; p-trend 〈 0.01) but not in men. Neither obesity (weight and body mass index) nor abdominal fat (waist-to-hip ratio, waist or hip circumference) measures were positively associated with overall non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma. Relative risks for highest versus lowest body mass index quartile were 1.09 (95% CI 0.85-1.38) and 0.92 (95% CI 0.71-1.19) for men and women, respectively. Women in the upper body mass index quartile were at greater risk of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (RR 2.18, 95% CI 1.05-4.53) and taller women had an elevated risk of follicular lymphoma (RR 1.25, 95% CI 0.59-2.62). Among men, height and body mass index were non-significantly, positively related to follicular lymphoma. Multiple myeloma risk alone was elevated for taller women (RR 2.34, 95% CI 1.29-4.21) and heavier men (RR 1.77, 95% CI 1.02-3.05). CONCLUSIONS: The EPIC analyses support an association between height and overall non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma among women and suggest heterogeneous subtype associations. This is one of the first prospective studies focusing on central adiposity and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma subtypes
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18835833
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; SUPPORT ; COHORT ; DEATH ; DISEASE ; MORTALITY ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISKS ; PATIENT ; ASSOCIATION ; prevention ; MULTIVARIATE ; DIET ; CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; EUROPE ; RELATIVE RISK ; REGRESSION ; CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE ; ISCHEMIC-STROKE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE ; METAANALYSIS ; USA ; cardiovascular ; DEATHS ; COMPETING RISKS
    Abstract: We examined the associations of intake of vegetables, legumes and fruit with all-cause and cause-specific mortality in a population with prevalent diabetes in Europe. A cohort of 10,449 participants with self-reported diabetes within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study was followed for a mean of 9 y. Intakes of vegetables, legumes, and fruit were assessed at baseline between 1992 and 2000 using validated country-specific questionnaires. A total of 1346 deaths occurred. Multivariate relative risks (RR) for all-cause mortality were estimated in Cox regression models and FIR for cause-specific mortality were derived in a competing risk model. An increment in intake of total vegetables, legumes, and fruit of 80 g/d was associated with a RR of death from all causes of 0.94 [95% CI 0.90-0.98]. Analyzed separately, vegetables and legumes were associated with a significantly reduced risk, whereas nonsignificant inverse associations for fruit intake were observed. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality and mortality due to non-CVD/non-cancer causes were significantly inversely associated with intake of total vegetables, legumes, and fruit (RR 0.88 [95% CI 0.81-0.95] and 0.90 [0.82-0.99], respectively) but not cancer mortality 0.08 [0.99-1.17]). Intake of vegetables, legumes, and fruit was associated with reduced risks of all-cause and CVD mortality in a diabetic population. The findings support the current state of evidence from general population studies that the protective potential of vegetable and fruit intake is larger for CVD than for cancer and suggest that diabetes patients may benefit from a diet high in vegetables and fruits
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18356334
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