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  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    The astronomy and astrophysics review 3 (1991), S. 1-46 
    ISSN: 1432-0754
    Subject(s): Nucleosynthesis ; Nuclear reactions ; Stars: abundances ; Interstellar Medium: abundances ; Cosmology ; Galaxies: evolution of
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Physics
    Notes: Summary The basic scheme of nucleosynthesis (building of heavy elements from light ones) has held up very well since it was first proposed more than 30 years ago by E.M. Burbidge, G.R. Burbidge, A.G.W. Cameron, W.A. Fowler, and F. Hoyle. Significant advances in the intervening years include (a) observations of elemental and a few isotopic ratios in many more extrasolar-system sites, including metal-poor dwarf irregular galaxies, where very little has happened, and supernovae and their remnants, where a great deal has happened, (b) recognition of the early universe as good for making all the elements up to helium, (c) resolution of heavy element burning in stars into separate carbon, neon, oxygen, and silicon burning, with fine tuning of the resulting abundances by explosive nucleosynthesis in outgoing supernova shock waves, (d) clarification of the role of Type I supernovae, (e) concordance between elements produced in short-lived and long-lived stars with those that increased quickly and slowly over the history of the galaxy, and (f) calibration of calculations of the evolution and explosion of massive stars against the detailed observations of SN 1987A. The discussion presupposes a reader (a) with some prior knowledge of astronomy at the level of recognizing what is meant by an A star and an AGB star and (b) with at least a mild interest in how we got to where we currently are.
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  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 221 (1969), S. 1038-1038 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] The period of the Crab Nebula object is changing at a rate of about 1.35 105 s yr1 (ref. 2). Rates of change of period for longer period pulsars on the other hand are at most of the order of 107 s yr1 (refs. 3 and 4). This means that the rate of change of periods must be a decreasing function of ...
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  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Macmillan Magazines Ltd.
    Nature 400 (1999), S. 34-35 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] From Earth and Moon to Sun and stars and on to galaxies and the Universe, our view of the world has grown more or less monotonically throughout recorded history, (at least Western history). It is this expanding horizon that Kitty Ferguson has set out to map. Her chosen method is to focus on ...
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  • 4
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences 224 (1973), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1749-6632
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 304 (1983), S. 394-394 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] ACCORDING to astronomical folklore1-3, the oldest stars in our Galaxy have far less than their fair share of most kinds of binary system. These old stars, found both in globular clusters and scattered singly through the galactic halo, are collectively called population II, in contrast to younger, ...
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  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 305 (1983), S. 10-11 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] GRAVITATION, while by far the weakest of the four traditional forces, nevertheless nearly always dominates in systems of sufficiently large scale. As a result, there are interesting problems in which general relativity (GR) introduces only small perturbations (bending of light rays by the Sun, for ...
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  • 7
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 297 (1982), S. 357-358 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] GRAVITATIONAL radiation not only exists, but it is apparently also doing exactly what general relativity says it ought to, at least in the binary pulsar PSR1913 + 16. This is the conclusion drawn by J.H. Taylor and J.M. Weisberg writing recently in the Astrophysical Journal (253, 908; 1982). It ...
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  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 336 (1988), S. 111-112 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] MASSIVE, short-lived stars have no business being located hundreds or thousands of parsecs out of the galactic plane, for the giant molecular clouds from which they normally form are confined to a layer with a scale height of 50-70 parsecs, and young stars, as a rule, move slowly. We have, ...
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  • 9
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 320 (1986), S. 311-312 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] WHOLE careers and industries are built on extremes - the highest jump, the oldest fossil, the fastest horse. Thus it is perhaps not surprising that astronomers should, now and again, ask themselves which is the smallest star and does it differ significantly from the largest planet? The current best ...
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  • 10
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Origins of life and evolution of the biospheres 27 (1997), S. 3-21 
    ISSN: 1573-0875
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Geosciences
    Notes: Abstract The chemical elements most widely distributed in terrestrial living creatures are the ones (apart from inert helium and neon) that are commonest in the Universe — hydrogen, oxygen, carbon, and nitrogen. A chemically different Universe would clearly have different biology, if any. We explore here the nuclear processes in stars, the early Universe, and elsewhere that have produced these common elements, and, while we are at it, also encounter the production of lithium, gold, uranium, and other elements of sociological, if not biological, importance. The relevant processes are, for the most part, well understood. Much less well understood is the overall history of chemical evolution of the Galaxy, from pure hydrogen and helium to the mix of elements we see today. One implication is that we cannot do a very good job of estimating how many stars and which ones might be orbited by habitable planets.
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