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  • 1
    Keywords: WOMEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; insulin ; caffeine ; glycemic index ; COFFEE CONSUMPTION ; LOAD
    Abstract: Data on the role of dietary factors in endometrial cancer development are limited and inconsistent. We applied a "nutrient-wide association study" approach to systematically evaluate dietary risk associations for endometrial cancer while controlling for multiple hypothesis tests using the false discovery rate (FDR) and validating the results in an independent cohort. We evaluated endometrial cancer risk associations for dietary intake of 84 foods and nutrients based on dietary questionnaires in three prospective studies, the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC; N = 1,303 cases) followed by validation of nine foods/nutrients (FDR 〈= 0.10) in the Nurses' Health Studies (NHS/NHSII; N = 1,531 cases). Cox regression models were used to estimate HRs and 95% confidence intervals (CI). In multivariate adjusted comparisons of the extreme categories of intake at baseline, coffee was inversely associated with endometrial cancer risk (EPIC, median intake 750 g/day vs. 8.6; HR, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.68-0.97, P-trend = 0.09; NHS/NHSII, median intake 1067 g/day vs. none; HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.70-0.96, P-trend = 0.04). Eight other dietary factors that were associated with endometrial cancer risk in the EPIC study (total fat, monounsaturated fat, carbohydrates, phosphorus, butter, yogurt, cheese, and potatoes) were not confirmed in the NHS/NHSII. Our findings suggest that coffee intake may be inversely associated with endometrial cancer risk. Further data are needed to confirm these findings and to examine the mechanisms linking coffee intake to endometrial cancer risk to develop improved prevention strategies.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25662427
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  • 2
    Keywords: THERAPY ; HEALTH ; WOMEN
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Half the epidemiological studies with information about menopausal hormone therapy and ovarian cancer risk remain unpublished, and some retrospective studies could have been biased by selective participation or recall. We aimed to assess with minimal bias the effects of hormone therapy on ovarian cancer risk. METHODS: Individual participant datasets from 52 epidemiological studies were analysed centrally. The principal analyses involved the prospective studies (with last hormone therapy use extrapolated forwards for up to 4 years). Sensitivity analyses included the retrospective studies. Adjusted Poisson regressions yielded relative risks (RRs) versus never-use. FINDINGS: During prospective follow-up, 12 110 postmenopausal women, 55% (6601) of whom had used hormone therapy, developed ovarian cancer. Among women last recorded as current users, risk was increased even with 〈5 years of use (RR 1.43, 95% CI 1.31-1.56; p〈0.0001). Combining current-or-recent use (any duration, but stopped 〈5 years before diagnosis) resulted in an RR of 1.37 (95% CI 1.29-1.46; p〈0.0001); this risk was similar in European and American prospective studies and for oestrogen-only and oestrogen-progestagen preparations, but differed across the four main tumour types (heterogeneity p〈0.0001), being definitely increased only for the two most common types, serous (RR 1.53, 95% CI 1.40-1.66; p〈0.0001) and endometrioid (1.42, 1.20-1.67; p〈0.0001). Risk declined the longer ago use had ceased, although about 10 years after stopping long-duration hormone therapy use there was still an excess of serous or endometrioid tumours (RR 1.25, 95% CI 1.07-1.46, p=0.005). INTERPRETATION: The increased risk may well be largely or wholly causal; if it is, women who use hormone therapy for 5 years from around age 50 years have about one extra ovarian cancer per 1000 users and, if its prognosis is typical, about one extra ovarian cancer death per 1700 users. FUNDING: Medical Research Council, Cancer Research UK.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25684585
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; neoplasms ; RISK ; RISKS ; SAMPLE ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; NO ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; REDUCED RISK ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; EPITHELIAL-CELLS ; CANCER RISKS ; REPLICATION ; GROWTH-FACTOR-BETA ; SUSCEPTIBILITY GENE ; HETEROGENEITY ; ONCOLOGY ; RE ; BRCA2 ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; SNPs ; SINGLE-NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; analysis ; USA ; CANDIDATE ; CANCER-RISK ; COMMON VARIANT ; CASP8 GENE ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; association study ; CONSORTIUM ; NUCLEOTIDE
    Abstract: The Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium selected 7 candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), for which there is evidence from previous studies of an association with variation in ovarian cancer or breast cancer risks. The SNPs selected for analysis were F31I (rs2273535) in AURKA, N372H (rs144848) in BRCA2, rs2854344 in intron 17 of RB1, rs2811712 5' flanking CDKN2A, rs523349 in the 3' UTR of SRD5A2, D302H (rs1045485) in CASP8 and L10P (rs1982073) in TGFB1. Fourteen studies genotyped 4,624 invasive epithelial ovarian cancer cases and 8,113 controls of white non-Hispanic origin. A marginally significant association was found for RB1 when all studies were included [ordinal odds ratio (OR) 0.88 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79-1.00) p = 0.041 and dominant OR 0.87 (95% CI 0.76-0.98) p = 0.025]; when the studies that originally suggested an association were excluded, the result was suggestive although no longer statistically significant (ordinal OR 0.92, 95% CI 0.79-1.06). This SNP has also been shown to have an association with decreased risk in breast cancer. There was a suggestion of an association for AURKA, when one study that caused significant study heterogeneity was excluded [ordinal OR 1.10 (95% CI 1.01-1.20) p = 0.027; dominant OR 1.12 (95% CI 1.01-1.24) p = 0.03]. The other 5 SNPs in BRCA2, CDKN2A, SRD5A2, CASP8 and TGFB1 showed no association with ovarian cancer risk; given the large sample size, these results can also be considered to be informative. These null results for SNPs identified from relatively large initial studies shows the importance of replicating associations by a consortium approach. (C) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18431743
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; PROSTATE ; RISK ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; BREAST ; CONSORTIUM ; MULTIPLE
    Abstract: Background: We previously reported an association between rs2660753, a prostate cancer susceptibility polymorphism, and invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC; OR = 1.2, 95% CI = 1.0-1.4, P-trend = 0.01) that showed a stronger association with the serous histological subtype (OR = 1.3, 95% CI = 1.1-1.5, P-trend = 0.003). Methods: We sought to replicate this association in 12 other studies comprising 4,482 cases and 6,894 controls of white non-Hispanic ancestry in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium. Results: No evidence for an association with all cancers or serous cancers was observed in a combined analysis of data from the replication studies (all: OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.9-1.1, P-trend = 0.61; serous: OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 0.9-1.1, P-trend = 0.85) or from the combined analysis of discovery and replication studies (all: OR = 1.0, 95% CI = 1.0-1.1, P-trend = 0.28; serous: OR = 1.1, 95% CI = 1.0-1.2, P-trend = 0.11). There was no evidence for statistical heterogeneity in ORs across the studies. Conclusions: Although rs2660753 is a strong prostate cancer susceptibility polymorphism, the association with another hormonally related cancer, invasive EOC, is not supported by this replication study. Impact: Our findings, based on a larger sample size, emphasize the importance of replicating potentially promising genetic risk associations.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21415361
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; THERAPY ; INFORMATION ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; incidence ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; BREAST ; BREAST-CANCER ; DESIGN ; AGE ; WOMEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; smoking ; cancer risk ; UNITED-STATES ; ALCOHOL ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; BIRTH COHORT ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; MASS INDEX ; ORAL-CONTRACEPTIVE USE ; REQUIRING PROLONGED OBSERVATION ; METAANALYSIS ; HORMONAL FACTORS ; ANTHROPOMETRIC MEASURES ; EPITHELIAL OVARIAN
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Only about half the studies that have collected information on the relevance of women's height and body mass index to their risk of developing ovarian cancer have published their results, and findings are inconsistent. Here, we bring together the worldwide evidence, published and unpublished, and describe these relationships. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Individual data on 25,157 women with ovarian cancer and 81,311 women without ovarian cancer from 47 epidemiological studies were collected, checked, and analysed centrally. Adjusted relative risks of ovarian cancer were calculated, by height and by body mass index. Ovarian cancer risk increased significantly with height and with body mass index, except in studies using hospital controls. For other study designs, the relative risk of ovarian cancer per 5 cm increase in height was 1.07 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-1.09; p〈0.001); this relationship did not vary significantly by women's age, year of birth, education, age at menarche, parity, menopausal status, smoking, alcohol consumption, having had a hysterectomy, having first degree relatives with ovarian or breast cancer, use of oral contraceptives, or use of menopausal hormone therapy. For body mass index, there was significant heterogeneity (p〈0.001) in the findings between ever-users and never-users of menopausal hormone therapy, but not by the 11 other factors listed above. The relative risk for ovarian cancer per 5 kg/m(2) increase in body mass index was 1.10 (95% CI, 1.07-1.13; p〈0.001) in never-users and 0.95 (95% CI, 0.92-0.99; p = 0.02) in ever-users of hormone therapy. CONCLUSIONS: Ovarian cancer is associated with height and, among never-users of hormone therapy, with body mass index. In high-income countries, both height and body mass index have been increasing in birth cohorts now developing the disease. If all other relevant factors had remained constant, then these increases in height and weight would be associated with a 3% increase in ovarian cancer incidence per decade. Please see later in the article for the Editors' Summary.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22606070
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  • 6
    Keywords: carcinoma ; fibroblasts ; METAANALYSIS ; susceptibility loci ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; REVERSE-TRANSCRIPTASE HTERT ; GENETIC-VARIATION ; COMMON VARIANTS ; TERT-CLPTM1L LOCUS ; BUCCAL CELLS
    Abstract: TERT-locus SNPs and leukocyte telomere measures are reportedly associated with risks of multiple cancers. Using the Illumina custom genotyping array iCOG, we analyzed similar to 480 SNPs at the TERT locus in breast (n = 103,991), ovarian (n = 39,774) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (n = 11,705) cancer cases and controls. Leukocyte telomere measurements were also available for 53,724 participants. Most associations cluster into three independent peaks. The minor allele at the peak 1 SNP rs2736108 associates with longer telomeres (P = 5.8 x 10(-7)), lower risks for estrogen receptor (ER)-negative (P = 1.0 x 10(-8)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.1 x 10(-5)) breast cancers and altered promoter assay signal. The minor allele at the peak 2 SNP rs7705526 associates with longer telomeres (P = 2.3 x 10(-14)), higher risk of low-malignant-potential ovarian cancer (P = 1.3 x 10(-15)) and greater promoter activity. The minor alleles at the peak 3 SNPs rs10069690 and rs2242652 increase ER-negative (P = 1.2 x 10(-12)) and BRCA1 mutation carrier (P = 1.6 x 10-14) breast and invasive ovarian (P = 1.3 x 10(-11)) cancer risks but not via altered telomere length. The cancer risk alleles of rs2242652 and rs10069690, respectively, increase silencing and generate a truncated TERT splice variant.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23535731
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  • 7
    Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process whereby epithelial cells assume mesenchymal characteristics to facilitate cancer metastasis. However, EMT also contributes to the initiation and development of primary tumors. Prior studies that explored the hypothesis that EMT gene variants contribute to epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC) risk have been based on small sample sizes and none have sought replication in an independent population. We screened 15,816 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 296 genes in a discovery phase using data from a genome-wide association study of EOC among women of European ancestry (1,947 cases and 2,009 controls) and identified 793 variants in 278 EMT-related genes that were nominally (P 〈 0.05) associated with invasive EOC. These SNPs were then genotyped in a larger study of 14,525 invasive-cancer patients and 23,447 controls. A P-value 〈0.05 and a false discovery rate (FDR) 〈0.2 were considered statistically significant. In the larger dataset, GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 was associated with the endometrioid subtype among Caucasians (odds ratio (OR) = 1.16, 95% CI = 1.07-1.25, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.19), whereas F8 rs7053448 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), F8 rs7058826 (OR = 1.69, 95% CI = 1.27-2.24, P = 0.0003, FDR = 0.12), and CAPN13 rs1983383 (OR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.69-0.90, P = 0.0005, FDR = 0.12) were associated with combined invasive EOC among Asians. In silico functional analyses revealed that GPC6/GPC5 rs17702471 coincided with DNA regulatory elements. These results suggest that EMT gene variants do not appear to play a significant role in the susceptibility to EOC.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 26399219
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; carcinoma ; CELL ; PATHWAY ; CLASSIFICATION ; RISK ; RISKS ; SITE ; GENE ; GENES ; TUMORS ; IMPACT ; CARCINOGENESIS ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; HEALTH ; AGE ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; etiology ; CARCINOMAS ; ORIGIN ; ONCOLOGY ; ASSOCIATIONS ; biomarker ; methods ; OVARIAN ; MicroRNAs ; LOW-GRADE ; GENETIC-VARIATION ; Genetic ; Type ; COMMON POLYMORPHISMS ; FOLATE ; SYNTHASE MESSENGER-RNA
    Abstract: Background: We previously reported the risks of ovarian carcinoma for common polymorphisms in one-carbon transfer genes. We sought to replicate associations for DPYD rs1801265, DNMT3A rs13420827, MTHFD1 rs1950902, MTHFS rs17284990, and TYMS rs495139 with risk of ovarian carcinoma overall and to use the large sample of assembled cases to investigate associations by histologic type. Methods: Associations were evaluated in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium, including 16 studies of 5,593 epithelial ovarian carcinoma cases and 9,962 controls of white non-Hispanic origin. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were adjusted for age and study site. Results: The five polymorphisms were not associated with ovarian carcinoma overall (P-trend 〉 0.13); however, associations for the minor allele at TYMS rs495139 were observed for carcinomas of mucinous type (OR, 1.19; 95% CI, 1.03-1.39; P = 0.02), clear cell type (OR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.75-0.99; P = 0.04), and endometrioid type (OR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.81-0.99; P = 0.04; Pheterogeneity = 0.001). Restriction to low-grade mucinous carcinomas further strengthened the association for the mucinous type (OR, 1.32; 95% CI, 1.07-1.62; P = 0.01). TYMS rs495139 was not associated with serous type (OR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.00-1.13; P = 0.05). Conclusions: TYMS rs495139 may be associated with a differential risk of ovarian carcinoma types, indicating the importance of accurate histopathologic classification. Impact: Biomarkers that distinguish ovarian carcinoma types are few, and TYMS rs495139 may provide a novel clue to type etiology. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 19(7); 1822-30. (C) 2010 AACR
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20570913
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  • 9
    Keywords: ALLELES, ASSOCIATION, BASAL-CELL CARCINOMA, BREAST-CANCER, CANCER, CANCERS, CANDIDATE SNPS, COLORECT
    Abstract: Epithelial ovarian cancer has a major heritable component, but the known susceptibility genes explain less than half the excess familial risk(1). We performed a genome-wide association study (GWAS) to identify common ovarian cancer susceptibility alleles. We evaluated 507,094 SNPs genotyped in 1,817 cases and 2,353 controls from the UK and similar to 2 million imputed SNPs. We genotyped the 22,790 top ranked SNPs in 4,274 cases and 4,809 controls of European ancestry from Europe, USA and Australia. We identified 12 SNPs at 9p22 associated with disease risk (P 〈 10(-8)). The most significant SNP (rs3814113; P = 2.5 x 10(-17)) was genotyped in a further 2,670 ovarian cancer cases and 4,668 controls, confirming its association (combined data odds ratio (OR) - 0.82, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.79-0.86, P-trend = 5.1 x 10(-19)). The association differs by histological subtype, being strongest for serous ovarian cancers (OR 0.77, 95% CI 0.73-0.81, Ptrend 4.1 x 10(-21))
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19648919
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; CANCER CELLS ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; CELL ; PROSTATE ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; SUSCEPTIBILITY LOCUS ; VARIANTS ; DISCOVERY ; STAGE ; ASSAY ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; genetics ; SNP ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; GENOTYPES ; CANCER-CELLS ; genotyping ; telomerase ; REPLICATION ; microenvironment ; case-control study ; ASSOCIATIONS ; VARIANT ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; SCIENCE ; SINGLE-NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; GENOTYPE ; LOCUS ; INCREASED RISK ; CANCER-RISK ; OVARIAN ; 8Q24 ; MYC ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; CONSORTIUM ; Genetic ; CONTRIBUTE ; single nucleotide ; INCESSANT OVULATION
    Abstract: We hypothesized that variants in genes expressed as a consequence of interactions between ovarian cancer cells and the host micro-environment could contribute to cancer susceptibility. We therefore used a two-stage approach to evaluate common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 173 genes involved in stromal epithelial interactions in the Ovarian Cancer Association Consortium (OCAC). In the discovery stage, cases with epithelial ovarian cancer (n = 675) and controls (n = 1,162) were genotyped at 1,536 SNPs using an Illumina GoldenGate assay. Based on Positive Predictive Value estimates, three SNPs-PODXL rs1013368, ITGA6 rs13027811, and MMP3 rs522616-were selected for replication using TaqMan genotyping in up to 3,059 serous invasive cases and 8,905 controls from 16 OCAC case-control studies. An additional 18 SNPs with Pper-allele〈0.05 in the discovery stage were selected for replication in a subset of five OCAC studies (n = 1,233 serous invasive cases; n = 3,364 controls). The discovery stage associations in PODXL, ITGA6, and MMP3 were attenuated in the larger replication set (adj. Pper-allele 〉= 0.5). However genotypes at TERT rs7726159 were associated with ovarian cancer risk in the smaller, five-study replication study (Pper-allele=0.03). Combined analysis of the discovery and replication sets for this TERT SNP showed an increased risk of serous ovarian cancer among non-Hispanic whites [adj. ORper-allele 1.14 (1.04-1.24) p = 0.003]. Our study adds to the growing evidence that, like the 8q24 locus, the telomerase reverse transcriptase locus at 5p15.33, is a general cancer susceptibility locus
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20628624
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