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  • 1
    Keywords: Life sciences ; Animal ecology ; Conservation biology ; Evolution (Biology) ; Zoology ; Animal genetics ; Life sciences ; Evolutionary Biology ; Animal Genetics and Genomics ; Conservation Biology/Ecology ; Animal ecology ; Zoology ; Springer eBooks
    Description / Table of Contents: Part 1. Introduction -- Chapter 1. Why is it Important to Continue Studying the Anatomy, Physiology, Sensory Ecology, and Evolution of Howler Monkeys? -- Part 2. Taxonomy, Genetics, Morphology and Evolution -- Chapter 2. Fossil Alouattines and the Origins of Alouatta: Craniodental Diversity and Interrelationships.-℗ Chapter 3. The Taxonomy of Howler Monkeys: Integrating Old and New Knowledge from Morphological and Genetic Studies -- Chapter 4. Cytogenetics of Howler Monkeys -- Chapter 5. Hybridization in Howler Monkeys: Current Understanding and Future Directions -- Chapter 6. Morphology of Howler Monkeys: A Review and Quantitative Analyses -- Part 3. Physiology -- Chapter 7. Hematology and Serum Biochemistry in Wild Howler Monkeys -- Chapter 8. Endocrinology of Howler Monkeys: Review and Directions for Future Research -- Chapter 9. The Howler Monkey as a Model for Exploring Host-Gut Microbiota Interactions in Primates -- Chapter 10. Ecological Determinants of Parasitism in Howler Monkeys -- Part 4. Ontogeny and Sensory Ecology -- Chapter 11. An Ontogenetic Framework for Alouatta: Infant Development and Evaluating -- Chapter 12.The Sensory Systems of Alouatta: Evolution with an Eye to Ecology -- Chapter 13. Production of Loud and Quiet Calls in Howler Monkeys -- Chapter 14. Function of Loud Calls in Howler Monkeys -- Part 5. Conclusions -- Chapter 15. New Challenges in the Study of Howler Monkey Anatomy, Physiology, Sensory Ecology, and Evolution: Where we are and where we need to go?
    Abstract: Howler monkeys (genus Alouatta) comprise twelve species of leaf-eating New World monkeys that range from southern Mexico through northern Argentina. This genus is the most widespread of any New World primate taxa, and can be found to inhabit a range of forest types from undisturbed rainforest to severely anthropogenically impacted forest fragments. Although there have been many studies on individual species of howler monkeys, this book is the first comprehensive volume to place information on howler behavior and biology within a theoretical framework of ecological and social adaptability. This is the first of two companion volumes devoted to the genus Alouatta. This volume: Provides new and original empirical and theoretical research on howler monkeys Presents℗ evolutionary and adaptive explanations for the ecological success of howler monkeys Examines howler behavior and ecology within a comparative framework These goals are achieved in a collection of chapters written by a distinguished group of scientists on the evolutionary history, paleontology, taxonomy, genetics, morphology, physiology, and anatomy of howlers. This volume also contains chapters on ethnoprimatology, conservation, and howlers as vectors of infectious diseases
    Pages: XXI, 425 p. 63 illus., 16 illus. in color. : online resource.
    ISBN: 9781493919574
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  • 2
    Keywords: Life sciences ; Animal behavior ; Animal ecology ; Conservation biology ; Zoology ; Life sciences ; Animal ecology ; Behavioural Sciences ; Conservation Biology/Ecology ; Zoology ; Springer eBooks
    Description / Table of Contents: PART 1. INTRODUCTION -- Chapter 1. Why is it Important to Continue Studying the Behavioral Ecology and Conservation Management of Howler Monkeys? -- PART 2: BEHAVIORAL ECOLOGY -- Chapter 2. Diets of Howler Monkeys.-℗ Chapter 3. Insights into Reproductive Strategies and Sexual Selection in Howler Monkeys -- Chapter 4. Evidence of Alternative Dietary Syndromes and Nutritional Goals in the Genus Alouatta.-℗ Chapter 5. Seed Dispersal by Howler Monkeys: Current Knowledge, Conservation Implications, and Future Directions -- Chapter 6. Interactions of Howler Monkeys with Other Vertebrates: A Review.-℗ Chapter 7. Solving the Collective Action Problem During Intergroup Encounters: The Case of Black and Gold Howler Monkeys -- Chapter 8. Howler Monkey Positional Behavior -- Chapter 9. Ranging Behavior and Spatial Cognition of Howler Monkeys -- PART 3: CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT -- Chapter 10. The Ethnoprimatology of Howler Monkeys (Alouatta spp.): From Past to Present -- Chapter 11. Anthropogenic Habitat Modification, Tourist Interactions and Crop-Raiding in Howler Monkeys -- Chapter 12. Health and Welfare of Howler Monkeys in Captivity -- Chapter 13. Fruit as a Key Factor in Howler Monkey Population Density: Conservation Implications. Chapter 14. Conservation of Alouatta: Social and Economic Drivers of Habitat Loss, Information Vacuum and Mitigating Population Declines -- PART 4: CONCLUSION -- Chapter 15. New Challenges in the Study of Howler Monkey Behavioral Ecology and Conservation: Where we are and where we need to go?
    Abstract: Howler monkeys (genus Alouatta) comprise℗ twelve species of leaf-eating New World monkeys that range from southern Mexico through northern Argentina. This genus is the most widespread of any New World primate taxa, and can be found to inhabit a range of forest types from undisturbed rainforest to severely anthropogenically impacted forest fragments. Although there have been many studies on individual species of howler monkeys, this book is the first comprehensive volume to place information on howler behavior and biology within a theoretical framework of ecological and social adaptability. This℗ is the second of two volumes devoted to the genus Alouatta. This volume: ℗ʺ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ Examines behavioral and physiological mechanisms that enable howler monkeys to exploit highly disturbed and fragmented habitats ℗ʺ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ ℗ Presents models of howler monkey diet, social organization, and mating systems that can also℗ inform researchers studying℗ Old World colobines, apes, and other tropical mammals These goals are achieved in a collection of chapters written by a distinguished group of scientists on the feeding ecology, behavior, mating strategies, and management and conservation of howlers. This℗ book also contains chapters on the howler microbiome, the concept of behavioral variability, sexual selection, and the role of primates in forest regeneration
    Pages: XIX, 440 p. 53 illus., 20 illus. in color. : online resource.
    ISBN: 9781493919604
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  • 3
    Keywords: PROTEOMICS ; molecular ; chemosensitivity ; VOLUME ; imaging ; MODELS ; MODEL ; IN-VIVO ; SERIES ; REGULATOR
    Type of Publication: Book chapter
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  • 4
    Keywords: CELLS ; INHIBITOR ; CELL ; Germany ; human ; INHIBITION ; SYSTEM ; ENZYMES ; GENE ; GENOME ; GENOME SEQUENCE ; PROTEIN ; CONTRAST ; SEQUENCE ; SEQUENCES ; chromosome ; VARIANTS ; SUBUNIT ; ACTIVE-SITE ; DESIGN ; DIFFERENCE ; Drosophila ; DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER ; ERYTHROCYTES ; ESCHERICHIA-COLI ; genome analysis ; GLUTATHIONE ; GLUTATHIONE-REDUCTASE ; INSECTICIDE RESISTANCE ; MELANOGASTER ; PHAGOCYTOSIS ; resistance ; SELENOCYSTEINE ; SINGLE-COPY ; VECTOR ; Plasmodium falciparum ; Anopheles gambiae ; Drosophila melanogaster ; Diptera ; insect redox metabolism
    Abstract: The mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, is an important vector of Plasmodium falciparum malaria. Full genome analysis revealed that, as in Drosophila melanogaster, the enzyme glutathione reductase is absent in A. gambiae and functionally substituted by the thioredoxin system. The key enzyme of this system is thioredoxin reductase-1, a homodimeric FAD-containing protein of 55.3 kDa per subunit, which catalyses the reaction NADPH + H+ + thioredoxin disulfide. NADP+ + thioredoxin dithiol. The A. gambiae trxr gene is located on chromosome X as a single copy; it represents three splice variants coding for two cytosolic and one mitochondrial variant. The predominant isoform, A. gambiae thioredoxin reductase-1, was recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and functionally compared with the wild-type enzyme isolated in a final yield of 1.4 U.ml(-1) of packed insect cells. In redox titrations, the substrate A. gambiae thioredoxin-1 (K-m = 8.5 muM, k(cat) = 15.4 s(-1) at pH 7.4 and 25degreesC) was unable to oxidize NADPH-reduced A. gambiae thioredoxin reductase-1 to the fully oxidized state. This indicates that, in contrast to other disulfide reductases, A. gambiae thioredoxin reductase-1 oscillates during catalysis between the four-electron reduced state and a two-electron reduced state. The thioredoxin reductases of the malaria system were compared. A. gambiae thioredoxin reductase-1 shares 52% and 45% sequence identity with its orthologues from humans and P. falciparum, respectively. A major difference among the three enzymes is the structure of the C-terminal redox centre, reflected in the varying resistance of catalytic intermediates to autoxidation. The relevant sequences of this centre are Thr-Cys-Cys-SerOH in A. gambiae thioredoxin reductase, Gly-Cys-selenocysteine-GlyOH in human thioredoxin reductase, and Cys-X-X-X-X-Cys-GlyOH in the P. falciparum enzyme. These differences offer an interesting approach to the design of species-specific inhibitors. Notably, A. gambiae thioredoxin reductase-1 is not a selenoenzyme but instead contains a highly unusual redoxactive Cys-Cys sequence
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
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  • 5
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; EXPRESSION ; IN-VITRO ; TUMOR-CELLS ; carcinoma ; CELL ; COMBINATION ; Germany ; human ; THERAPY ; VITRO ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; DRUG ; cell line ; LINES ; MECHANISM ; mechanisms ; CELL-LINES ; VARIANTS ; GLUTATHIONE ; resistance ; CELL-LINE ; LINE ; PHENOTYPE ; MULTIDRUG-RESISTANCE ; protein expression ; PROTEOMICS ; HEAT-SHOCK PROTEINS ; POLYACRYLAMIDE GELS ; SMALL STRESS-PROTEINS ; 2-DIMENSIONAL ELECTROPHORESIS ; chemoresistance,mass spectrometry,pancreatic carcinoma,proteome analysis,proteomics,thermoresistance
    Abstract: In order to find candidate proteins that are potentially associated with the thermoresistant phenotype in combination with drug resistance, we analyzed the differential protein expression in vitro in the human pancreatic cancer cell line EPP85-181-P and classical and atypical multidrug-resistant variants and their thermoresistant counterparts using proteomics. This study identifies sets of proteins that may lead to the development of thermoresistance. These results provide a fundamental basis to elucidate the molecular mechanism of thermoresistance and chemoresistance phenomena that may assist the therapy of inoperable cancers
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 14730581
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  • 6
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CANCER ; CELLS ; EXPRESSION ; INHIBITOR ; tumor ; SYSTEM ; DEATH ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; TUMORS ; LINES ; MECHANISM ; MARKER ; mechanisms ; BINDING ; CELL-LINES ; DOWN-REGULATION ; NERVOUS-SYSTEM ; resistance ; CELL-DEATH ; mass spectrometry ; chemotherapy ; LINE ; MARKERS ; vimentin ; OVEREXPRESSION ; DRUG-RESISTANCE ; cell lines ; PROTEOMICS ; neuroblastoma ; chemoresistance ; multidrug resistance ; BINDING PROTEIN ; INHIBITORS ; BINDING-PROTEIN ; CHILDHOOD ; P-GLYCOPROTEIN ; SOLID TUMORS ; PROTOCOL ; cell death ; PROGNOSTIC MARKER ; ABILITY ; POLYACRYLAMIDE-GELS ; MULTIDRUG TRANSPORTER ; pediatric tumor ; THERMORESISTANCE ; TOPOISOMERASE-II-ALPHA ; two-dimensional gelelectrophoresis resistance
    Abstract: Neuroblastoma, one of the most common pediatric solid tumors, originates from the peripheral sympathetic nervous system and is responsible for approximately 15% of all childhood cancer deaths. Among the several antineoplastic drugs used in neuroblastoma chemotherapeutic protocols, topoisomerase inhibitors (i.e., etoposide) represent the most commonly used. Several resistance mechanisms limit the clinical success of topoisomerase-targeting drugs, mainly reducing the ability of neoplastic cells to start programmed cell death when exposed to antineoplastic drugs. The aim of this study was to determine, by means of proteomics, potential markers of etoposide resistance in human neuroblastoma cell lines as well as to investigate protein levels and modifications possibly involved in the onset of resistance. The etoposide resistant clone showed overexpression of the following proteins: peroxiredoxin 1, P-galactoside soluble lectin binding protein, vimentin (three protein spots), heat shock 27 kDa protein (two protein spots) and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K. In addition, we also found down-regulation of dUTP pyrophosphatase. This investigation might represent a first step towards the development of novel prognostic markers of neuroblastoma chemotherapy
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15682461
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  • 7
    ISSN: 0196-9781
    Keywords: Enzyme hydrolysis ; K562(S) cell differentiation ; Receptor binding ; hydrolysis by-products uptake
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    ISSN: 0304-4165
    Keywords: Albumin protection ; Indole compound ; Melanin synthesis ; Tyrosinase inhibition
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1432-1106
    Keywords: Key words Middle-ear muscle activity (MEMA) ; Phasic activity ; REM sleep
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Abstract  Since some evidence has supported a complementary relationship between waking and REM-sleep eye movement (variations in frequency, amplitude, or direction of waking saccades have been found to inversely affect the corresponding parameters of rapid eye movements), the present study assessed whether this relationship can also be shown for other phasic components of REM sleep, such as middle-ear muscle activity (MEMA), as a consequence of an increase of middle-ear reflex frequency during pre-sleep wake. Ten subjects were studied in three consecutive nights (one adaptation, one baseline, one experimental). In the experimental night, subjects underwent a 2-h pure-tone (1000 Hz, 90 dB SPL) auditory stimulation and MEMA was monitored every 15 min; noise exposure during daytime was also controlled. Results show that MEMA frequency during REM sleep significantly decreased during the experimental nights compared with baseline nights, while each sleep variable as well as mean daily auditory input did not present any significant difference between baseline and experimental nights. Results suggest that the complementary relationship between wake and REM sleep is not bounded to oculomotor activity, but it may also be extended at least to middle-ear muscle phasic activity.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1432-1203
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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