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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2014-03-29
    Description: Cancer cells induce a set of adaptive response pathways to survive in the face of stressors due to inadequate vascularization. One such adaptive pathway is the unfolded protein (UPR) or endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response mediated in part by the ER-localized transmembrane sensor IRE1 (ref. 2) and its substrate XBP1 (ref. 3). Previous studies report UPR activation in various human tumours, but the role of XBP1 in cancer progression in mammary epithelial cells is largely unknown. Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC)--a form of breast cancer in which tumour cells do not express the genes for oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and HER2 (also called ERBB2 or NEU)--is a highly aggressive malignancy with limited treatment options. Here we report that XBP1 is activated in TNBC and has a pivotal role in the tumorigenicity and progression of this human breast cancer subtype. In breast cancer cell line models, depletion of XBP1 inhibited tumour growth and tumour relapse and reduced the CD44(high)CD24(low) population. Hypoxia-inducing factor 1alpha (HIF1alpha) is known to be hyperactivated in TNBCs. Genome-wide mapping of the XBP1 transcriptional regulatory network revealed that XBP1 drives TNBC tumorigenicity by assembling a transcriptional complex with HIF1alpha that regulates the expression of HIF1alpha targets via the recruitment of RNA polymerase II. Analysis of independent cohorts of patients with TNBC revealed a specific XBP1 gene expression signature that was highly correlated with HIF1alpha and hypoxia-driven signatures and that strongly associated with poor prognosis. Our findings reveal a key function for the XBP1 branch of the UPR in TNBC and indicate that targeting this pathway may offer alternative treatment strategies for this aggressive subtype of breast cancer.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4105133/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4105133/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Chen, Xi -- Iliopoulos, Dimitrios -- Zhang, Qing -- Tang, Qianzi -- Greenblatt, Matthew B -- Hatziapostolou, Maria -- Lim, Elgene -- Tam, Wai Leong -- Ni, Min -- Chen, Yiwen -- Mai, Junhua -- Shen, Haifa -- Hu, Dorothy Z -- Adoro, Stanley -- Hu, Bella -- Song, Minkyung -- Tan, Chen -- Landis, Melissa D -- Ferrari, Mauro -- Shin, Sandra J -- Brown, Myles -- Chang, Jenny C -- Liu, X Shirley -- Glimcher, Laurie H -- AI32412/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- CA112663/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- K99 CA175290/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- K99CA175290/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016086/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R00 CA160351/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI032412/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA112663/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG004069/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01HG004069/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Apr 3;508(7494):103-7. doi: 10.1038/nature13119. Epub 2014 Mar 23.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Sandra and Edward Meyer Cancer Center of Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA [2] Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; 1] Center for Systems Biomedicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA [2] Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA [3]. ; 1] Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA [2]. ; 1] Department of Bioinformatics, School of Life Science and Technology, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092, China [2] Institute of Animal Genetics and Breeding, College of Animal Science and Technology, Sichuan Agricultural University, Ya'an, Sichuan 625014, China [3]. ; Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; 1] Center for Systems Biomedicine, Division of Digestive Diseases, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095, USA [2] Department of Cancer Immunology and AIDS, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of Medical Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. ; Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Department of Cell and Developmental Biology, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Endocrine Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA. ; Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children's Hospital Boston, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Houston Methodist Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA [2] Department of Nanomedicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; 1] Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, 1300 York Avenue, New York, New York 10065, USA [2] Houston Methodist Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24670641" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antigens, CD24/metabolism ; Antigens, CD44/metabolism ; Cell Hypoxia/genetics ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Proliferation ; DNA-Binding Proteins/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Disease Progression ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Gene Regulatory Networks ; Gene Silencing ; Humans ; Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/*metabolism ; Mice ; Neoplasm Invasiveness ; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local ; Prognosis ; RNA Polymerase II/metabolism ; Transcription Factors/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Transcription, Genetic ; Triple Negative Breast Neoplasms/blood supply/genetics/*metabolism/*pathology ; Unfolded Protein Response
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-09-04
    Description: Tumour-initiating cells (TICs) are responsible for metastatic dissemination and clinical relapse in a variety of cancers. Analogies between TICs and normal tissue stem cells have led to the proposal that activation of the normal stem-cell program within a tissue serves as the major mechanism for generating TICs. Supporting this notion, we and others previously established that the Slug epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-inducing transcription factor (EMT-TF), a member of the Snail family, serves as a master regulator of the gland-reconstituting activity of normal mammary stem cells, and that forced expression of Slug in collaboration with Sox9 in breast cancer cells can efficiently induce entrance into the TIC state. However, these earlier studies focused on xenograft models with cultured cell lines and involved ectopic expression of EMT-TFs, often at non-physiological levels. Using genetically engineered knock-in reporter mouse lines, here we show that normal gland-reconstituting mammary stem cells residing in the basal layer of the mammary epithelium and breast TICs originating in the luminal layer exploit the paralogous EMT-TFs Slug and Snail, respectively, which induce distinct EMT programs. Broadly, our findings suggest that the seemingly similar stem-cell programs operating in TICs and normal stem cells of the corresponding normal tissue are likely to differ significantly in their details.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4764075/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4764075/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ye, Xin -- Tam, Wai Leong -- Shibue, Tsukasa -- Kaygusuz, Yasemin -- Reinhardt, Ferenc -- Ng Eaton, Elinor -- Weinberg, Robert A -- K99 CA194160/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- K99-CA194160/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA080111/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01-CA080111/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA078461/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01-CA078461/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U01 CA184897/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U01-CA184897/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Sep 10;525(7568):256-60. doi: 10.1038/nature14897. Epub 2015 Sep 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; Genome Institute of Singapore, 60 Biopolis Street, Singapore 138672, Singapore. ; Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, 14 Medical Drive, Singapore 117599, Singapore. ; Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. ; Ludwig Center for Molecular Oncology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26331542" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition/genetics/*physiology ; Female ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Mammary Glands, Animal/*cytology ; Mice ; Neoplastic Stem Cells/*cytology/metabolism ; SOX9 Transcription Factor/metabolism ; Stem Cells/*cytology/metabolism ; Transcription Factors/deficiency/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-03-05
    Description: The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition enables carcinoma cells to acquire malignancy-associated traits and the properties of tumor-initiating cells (TICs). TICs have emerged in recent years as important targets for cancer therapy, owing to their ability to drive clinical relapse and enable metastasis. Here, we propose a strategy to eliminate mesenchymal TICs by inducing their conversion to more epithelial counterparts that have lost tumor-initiating ability. We report that increases in intracellular levels of the second messenger, adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate, and the subsequent activation of protein kinase A (PKA) induce a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET) in mesenchymal human mammary epithelial cells. PKA activation triggers epigenetic reprogramming of TICs by the histone demethylase PHF2, which promotes their differentiation and loss of tumor-initiating ability. This study provides proof-of-principle for inducing an MET as differentiation therapy for TICs and uncovers a role for PKA in enforcing and maintaining the epithelial state.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Pattabiraman, Diwakar R -- Bierie, Brian -- Kober, Katharina Isabelle -- Thiru, Prathapan -- Krall, Jordan A -- Zill, Christina -- Reinhardt, Ferenc -- Tam, Wai Leong -- Weinberg, Robert A -- R01-CA078461/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Mar 4;351(6277):aad3680. doi: 10.1126/science.aad3680.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. ; Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Genome Institute of Singapore, 60 Biopolis Street, Singapore. Cancer Science Institute of Singapore, 14 Medical Drive, Singapore. ; Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Ludwig Center for Molecular Oncology at MIT, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA. weinberg@wi.mit.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26941323" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-07-03
    Description: RAF kinase inhibitors are clinically active in patients with BRAF (V600E) mutant melanoma. However, rarely do tumors regress completely, with the majority of responses being short-lived. This is partially mediated through the loss of negative feedback loops after MAPK inhibition and reactivation of upstream signaling. Here, we demonstrate that the deubiquitinating enzyme USP28 functions through a feedback loop to destabilize RAF family members. Loss of USP28 stabilizes BRAF enhancing downstream MAPK activation and promotes resistance to RAF inhibitor therapy in culture and in vivo models. Importantly, we demonstrate that USP28 is deleted in a proportion of melanoma patients and may act as a biomarker for response to BRAF inhibitor therapy in patients. Furthermore, we identify Rigosertib as a possible therapeutic strategy for USP28-depleted tumors. Our results show that loss of USP28 enhances MAPK activity through the stabilization of RAF family members and is a key factor in BRAF inhibitor resistance.
    Keywords: Solid Tumors
    Print ISSN: 0022-1007
    Electronic ISSN: 1540-9538
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-11-09
    Description: We report 5-year follow-up of a multicenter phase 2 study of lenalidomide plus rituximab (LR) as initial treatment of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL). The regimen includes induction and maintenance with the LR doublet. Treatment was continuous until progression, with optional discontinuation after 3 years. The median age of the 38 participants was 65 years, with MCL international prognostic index scores balanced among low, intermediate, and high risk (34%, 34%, and 32%, respectively). Twenty-seven (75%) of the 36 evaluable patients completed ≥3 years of study treatment. At a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 21-78), the 3-year progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 80% and 90%, respectively, with 5-year estimated PFS and OS of 64% and 77%, respectively. During maintenance, hematologic adverse events (AEs) included asymptomatic grade 3 or 4 cytopenias (42% neutropenia, 5% thrombocytopenia, 3% anemia) and mostly grade 1 or 2 infections managed in the outpatient setting (45% upper respiratory infection, 21% urinary tract infection, 13% sinusitis, 11% cellulitis, 8% pneumonia). Nonhematologic AEs, such as constitutional and inflammatory symptoms, occurred at reduced frequency and intensity compared with induction. A peripheral blood minimal residual disease (MRD) assay (clonoSEQ) showed MRD-negative complete remission in 8 of 10 subjects who had completed ≥3 years of treatment and with available samples for analysis. With longer follow-up, LR continues to demonstrate durable responses and manageable safety as initial induction and maintenance therapy for MCL ( ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01472562).
    Keywords: Lymphoid Neoplasia, Clinical Trials and Observations
    Print ISSN: 0006-4971
    Electronic ISSN: 1528-0020
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
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