Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-07-26
    Description: Four model polyurethane (PU) hard segments were synthesized by reaction of butanol with four typical diisocyanates. The four diisocyanates were aromatic 4,4'-diphenylmethane diisocyanate (4,4'-MDI) and MDI-50 (50% mixture of 2,4'-MDI and 4,4'-MDI), cycloaliphatic 4,4'-dicyclohexylmethane diisocyanate (HMDI) and linear aliphatic 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI). FTIR, 1 H NMR, 13 C NMR, MS, X-ray and DSC methods were employed to determine their structures and to analyse their crystallization behaviours and hydrogen bonding interactions. Each of the four PU compounds prepared in the present work displays unique spectral characteristics. The FTIR bands and NMR resonance peaks assigned in the four samples thus provide a reliable database and starting point for investigating the relationship between hard segment structure and the crystallization and hydrogen bonding behaviour in more complex-segmented PU compositions.
    Keywords: materials science, spectroscopy
    Electronic ISSN: 2054-5703
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Published by Royal Society
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-09-20
    Description: Severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome (SFTS) caused by a recently identified bunyavirus, SFTSV, is an emerging infectious disease with extensive geographical distribution and high mortality. Progressive viral replication and severe thrombocytopenia are key features of SFTSV infection and fatal outcome, whereas the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We revealed arginine deficiency in SFTS cases by performing metabolomics analysis on two independent patient cohorts, suggesting that arginine metabolism by nitric oxide synthase and arginase is a key pathway in SFTSV infection and consequential death. Arginine deficiency was associated with decreased intraplatelet nitric oxide (Plt-NO) concentration, platelet activation, and thrombocytopenia. An expansion of arginase-expressing granulocytic myeloid-derived suppressor cells was observed, which was related to T cell CD3- chain down-regulation and virus clearance disturbance, implicating a role of arginase activity and arginine depletion in the impaired anti-SFTSV T cell function. Moreover, a comprehensive measurement of arginine bioavailability, global arginine bioavailability ratio, was shown to be a good prognostic marker for fatal prediction in early infection. A randomized controlled trial demonstrated that arginine administration was correlated with enhanced Plt-NO concentration, suppressed platelet activation, and elevated CD3- chain expression and eventually associated with an accelerated virus clearance and thrombocytopenia recovery. Together, our findings revealed the arginine catabolism pathway–associated regulation of platelet homeostasis and T cell dysregulation after SFTSV infection, which not only provided a functional mechanism underlying SFTS pathogenesis but also offered an alternative therapy choice for SFTS.
    Print ISSN: 1946-6234
    Electronic ISSN: 1946-6242
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-06-16
    Description: Crystal symmetry plays a central role in governing a wide range of fundamental physical phenomena. One example is nonlinear optical second harmonic generation (SHG), which requires inversion symmetry breaking. We report a unique stacking-induced SHG in graphene trilayers, whose individual monolayer sheet is centrosymmetric. Depending on layer stacking sequence, we observe a strong optical SHG in a Bernal ABA–stacked non-centrosymmetric trilayer, while it vanishes in a rhombohedral ABC–stacked one, which preserves inversion symmetry. This highly contrasting SHG due to the distinct stacking symmetry enables us to map out the ABA and ABC crystal domains in an otherwise homogeneous graphene trilayer. The extracted second-order nonlinear susceptibility of the ABA trilayer is surprisingly large, comparable to the best known two-dimensional semiconductors enhanced by excitonic resonance. Our results reveal a novel stacking order–induced nonlinear optical effect, as well as unleash the opportunity for studying intriguing physical phenomena predicted for stacking-dependent ABA and ABC graphene trilayers.
    Electronic ISSN: 2375-2548
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-07-31
    Print ISSN: 0270-7306
    Electronic ISSN: 1098-5549
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-02-09
    Description: Objectives Human metapneumovirus (HMPV) is one of the most important respiratory viral pathogens affecting infants and children worldwide. Our study describes the epidemiological and clinical characteristics of HMPV present in patients hospitalised with acute respiratory illness (ARI) in Guangzhou, Southern China. Study design A cross-sectional study. Setting Two tertiary hospitals in Guangzhou. Participants and methods Throat swabs were collected over a 3-year period from 5133 paediatric patients (≤14 years) hospitalised with ARI. Patients who are HMPV positive with clinical presentations (101/103) were recorded for further analysis. Results Of the 5133 patients included in the study, 103 (2.0%) were positive for HMPV. HMPV was more prevalent in children ≤5 years (2.2%, 98/4399) compared with older children (〉5–14 years) (0.7%, 5/734) (P = 0.004). Two seasonal HMPV peaks were observed each year and mainly occurred in spring and early summer. Overall, 18.4% (19/103) of patients who are HMPV positive were codetected with other pathogens, most frequently respiratory syncytial virus (36.8%, 7/19). Patients who are HMPV positive presented with a wide spectrum of clinical features, including cough (100.0%, 101/101), abnormal pulmonary breath sound (91.1%, 92/101), fever (88.1%, 89/101), expectoration (77.2%, 78/101), coryza (50.5%, 51/101) and wheezing (46.5%, 47/101). The main diagnosis of patients who are HMPV positive was bronchopneumonia (66.7%, 56/84). Fever (≥38˚C) (91.6%, 76/83) was detected more often in patients with only HMPV detected than in patients with HMPV plus other pathogen(s) detected (72.2%, 13/18) (P=0.037), whereas diarrhoea was more common in patients with HMPV plus other pathogen(s) detected (22.2%, 4/18), compared with patients with HMPV only (3.6%, 3/83) (P=0.018). Conclusions HMPV is an important respiratory pathogen in children with ARI in Guangzhou, particularly in children ≤5 years old. HMPV has a seasonal variation. Bronchopneumonia is a major diagnosis in patients who are HMPV positive.
    Keywords: Open access, Infectious diseases, Epidemiology
    Electronic ISSN: 2044-6055
    Topics: Medicine
    Published by BMJ Publishing
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-01-03
    Description: Since its emergence in 2013, the H7N9 low-pathogenic avian influenza virus (LPAIV) has been circulating in domestic poultry in China, causing five waves of human infections. A novel H7N9 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) variant possessing multiple basic amino acids at the cleavage site of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein was first reported in two cases of human infection in January 2017. More seriously, those novel H7N9 HPAIV variants have been transmitted and caused outbreaks on poultry farms in eight provinces in China. Herein, we demonstrate the presence of three different amino acid motifs at the cleavage sites of these HPAIV variants which were isolated from chickens and humans and likely evolved from the preexisting LPAIVs. Animal experiments showed that these novel H7N9 HPAIV variants are both highly pathogenic in chickens and lethal to mice. Notably, human-origin viruses were more pathogenic in mice than avian viruses, and the mutations in the PB2 gene associated with adaptation to mammals (E627K, A588V, and D701N) were identified by next-generation sequencing (NGS) and Sanger sequencing of the isolates from infected mice. No polymorphisms in the key amino acid substitutions of PB2 and HA in isolates from infected chicken lungs were detected by NGS. In sum, these results highlight the high degree of pathogenicity and the valid transmissibility of this new H7N9 variant in chickens and the quick adaptation of this new H7N9 variant to mammals, so the risk should be evaluated and more attention should be paid to this variant. IMPORTANCE Due to the recent increased numbers of zoonotic infections in poultry and persistent human infections in China, influenza A(H7N9) virus has remained a public health threat. Most of the influenza A(H7N9) viruses reported previously have been of low pathogenicity. Now, these novel H7N9 HPAIV variants have caused human infections in three provinces and outbreaks on poultry farms in eight provinces in China. We analyzed the molecular features and compared the relative characteristics of one H7N9 LPAIV and two H7N9 HPAIVs isolated from chickens and two human-origin H7N9 HPAIVs in chicken and mouse models. We found that all HPAIVs both are highly pathogenic and have valid transmissibility in chickens. Strikingly, the human-origin viruses were more highly pathogenic than the avian-origin viruses in mice, and dynamic mutations were confirmed by NGS and Sanger sequencing. Our findings offer important insight into the origin, adaptation, pathogenicity, and transmissibility of these viruses to both poultry and mammals.
    Print ISSN: 0022-538X
    Electronic ISSN: 1098-5514
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2012-05-19
    Description: Members of the opioid receptor family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are found throughout the peripheral and central nervous system, where they have key roles in nociception and analgesia. Unlike the 'classical' opioid receptors, delta, kappa and mu (delta-OR, kappa-OR and mu-OR), which were delineated by pharmacological criteria in the 1970s and 1980s, the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide receptor (NOP, also known as ORL-1) was discovered relatively recently by molecular cloning and characterization of an orphan GPCR. Although it shares high sequence similarity with classical opioid GPCR subtypes ( approximately 60%), NOP has a markedly distinct pharmacology, featuring activation by the endogenous peptide N/OFQ, and unique selectivity for exogenous ligands. Here we report the crystal structure of human NOP, solved in complex with the peptide mimetic antagonist compound-24 (C-24) (ref. 4), revealing atomic details of ligand-receptor recognition and selectivity. Compound-24 mimics the first four amino-terminal residues of the NOP-selective peptide antagonist UFP-101, a close derivative of N/OFQ, and provides important clues to the binding of these peptides. The X-ray structure also shows substantial conformational differences in the pocket regions between NOP and the classical opioid receptors kappa (ref. 5) and mu (ref. 6), and these are probably due to a small number of residues that vary between these receptors. The NOP-compound-24 structure explains the divergent selectivity profile of NOP and provides a new structural template for the design of NOP ligands.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356928/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356928/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Thompson, Aaron A -- Liu, Wei -- Chun, Eugene -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Wu, Huixian -- Vardy, Eyal -- Huang, Xi-Ping -- Trapella, Claudio -- Guerrini, Remo -- Calo, Girolamo -- Roth, Bryan L -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Stevens, Raymond C -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073197-08/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA017204/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA017204-08/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA027170/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA027170-03/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA27170/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618-02/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Y1-CO-1020/CO/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Y1-GM-1104/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 May 16;485(7398):395-9. doi: 10.1038/nature11085.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22596163" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Binding Sites ; Biomimetic Materials/*chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Ligands ; Models, Molecular ; Narcotic Antagonists ; Opioid Peptides/*chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology ; Piperidines/*chemistry/*metabolism/pharmacology ; Protein Conformation ; Receptors, Opioid/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Receptors, Opioid, kappa/chemistry/metabolism ; Spiro Compounds/*chemistry/*metabolism/pharmacology ; Substrate Specificity
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2014-07-22
    Description: Fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) is an autocrine/paracrine regulator whose binding to heparan sulphate proteoglycans effectively precludes its circulation. Although FGF1 is known as a mitogenic factor, FGF1 knockout mice develop insulin resistance when stressed by a high-fat diet, suggesting a potential role in nutrient homeostasis. Here we show that parenteral delivery of a single dose of recombinant FGF1 (rFGF1) results in potent, insulin-dependent lowering of glucose levels in diabetic mice that is dose-dependent but does not lead to hypoglycaemia. Chronic pharmacological treatment with rFGF1 increases insulin-dependent glucose uptake in skeletal muscle and suppresses the hepatic production of glucose to achieve whole-body insulin sensitization. The sustained glucose lowering and insulin sensitization attributed to rFGF1 are not accompanied by the side effects of weight gain, liver steatosis and bone loss associated with current insulin-sensitizing therapies. We also show that the glucose-lowering activity of FGF1 can be dissociated from its mitogenic activity and is mediated predominantly via FGF receptor 1 signalling. Thus we have uncovered an unexpected, neomorphic insulin-sensitizing action for exogenous non-mitogenic human FGF1 with therapeutic potential for the treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4184286/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4184286/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Suh, Jae Myoung -- Jonker, Johan W -- Ahmadian, Maryam -- Goetz, Regina -- Lackey, Denise -- Osborn, Olivia -- Huang, Zhifeng -- Liu, Weilin -- Yoshihara, Eiji -- van Dijk, Theo H -- Havinga, Rick -- Fan, Weiwei -- Yin, Yun-Qiang -- Yu, Ruth T -- Liddle, Christopher -- Atkins, Annette R -- Olefsky, Jerrold M -- Mohammadi, Moosa -- Downes, Michael -- Evans, Ronald M -- DE13686/DE/NIDCR NIH HHS/ -- DK-033651/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK-063491/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK-074868/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK057978/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK090962/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- ES010337/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- HL088093/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- HL105278/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- P01 DK054441/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P01 DK074868/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P01 HL088093/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- P01-DK054441-14A1/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P30 DK063491/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P42 ES010337/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL105278/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R24 DK090962/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK033651/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK057978/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- T32 DK007494/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- T32-DK-007494/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- U54 HD012303/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- U54-HD-012303-25/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Sep 18;513(7518):436-9. doi: 10.1038/nature13540. Epub 2014 Jul 16.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2]. ; 1] Center for Liver, Digestive and Metabolic Diseases, Departments of Pediatrics and Laboratory Medicine, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands [2]. ; Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016, USA. ; Department of Medicine, Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093, USA. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Pharmacology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016, USA [2] School of Pharmacy, Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, Zhejiang 325035, China. ; Center for Liver, Digestive and Metabolic Diseases, Departments of Pediatrics and Laboratory Medicine, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands. ; The Storr Liver Unit, Westmead Millennium Institute and University of Sydney, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, New South Wales 2145, Australia. ; 1] Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25043058" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Blood Glucose/metabolism ; Body Weight/drug effects ; Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/drug therapy/metabolism ; Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/metabolism ; Diet, High-Fat ; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug ; Fibroblast Growth Factor 1/administration & dosage/adverse effects/*pharmacology ; Glucose/*metabolism ; Glucose Tolerance Test ; Humans ; Insulin/*metabolism ; Insulin Resistance ; Liver/drug effects/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Obese ; Mitogens/pharmacology ; Muscle, Skeletal/drug effects/metabolism ; Receptor, Fibroblast Growth Factor, Type 1/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2011-04-16
    Description: In organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), a stack of multiple organic layers facilitates charge flow from the low work function [~4.7 electron volts (eV)] of the transparent electrode (tin-doped indium oxide, ITO) to the deep energy levels (~6 eV) of the active light-emitting organic materials. We demonstrate a chlorinated ITO transparent electrode with a work function of 〉6.1 eV that provides a direct match to the energy levels of the active light-emitting materials in state-of-the art OLEDs. A highly simplified green OLED with a maximum external quantum efficiency (EQE) of 54% and power efficiency of 230 lumens per watt using outcoupling enhancement was demonstrated, as were EQE of 50% and power efficiency of 110 lumens per watt at 10,000 candelas per square meter.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Helander, M G -- Wang, Z B -- Qiu, J -- Greiner, M T -- Puzzo, D P -- Liu, Z W -- Lu, Z H -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 May 20;332(6032):944-7. doi: 10.1126/science.1202992. Epub 2011 Apr 14.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Toronto, 184 College Street, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5S 3E4. michael.helander@utoronto.ca〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21493822" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2013-04-06
    Description: A number of human cancers harbor somatic point mutations in the genes encoding isocitrate dehydrogenases 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2). These mutations alter residues in the enzyme active sites and confer a gain-of-function in cancer cells, resulting in the accumulation and secretion of the oncometabolite (R)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2HG). We developed a small molecule, AGI-6780, that potently and selectively inhibits the tumor-associated mutant IDH2/R140Q. A crystal structure of AGI-6780 complexed with IDH2/R140Q revealed that the inhibitor binds in an allosteric manner at the dimer interface. The results of steady-state enzymology analysis were consistent with allostery and slow-tight binding by AGI-6780. Treatment with AGI-6780 induced differentiation of TF-1 erythroleukemia and primary human acute myelogenous leukemia cells in vitro. These data provide proof-of-concept that inhibitors targeting mutant IDH2/R140Q could have potential applications as a differentiation therapy for cancer.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wang, Fang -- Travins, Jeremy -- DeLaBarre, Byron -- Penard-Lacronique, Virginie -- Schalm, Stefanie -- Hansen, Erica -- Straley, Kimberly -- Kernytsky, Andrew -- Liu, Wei -- Gliser, Camelia -- Yang, Hua -- Gross, Stefan -- Artin, Erin -- Saada, Veronique -- Mylonas, Elena -- Quivoron, Cyril -- Popovici-Muller, Janeta -- Saunders, Jeffrey O -- Salituro, Francesco G -- Yan, Shunqi -- Murray, Stuart -- Wei, Wentao -- Gao, Yi -- Dang, Lenny -- Dorsch, Marion -- Agresta, Sam -- Schenkein, David P -- Biller, Scott A -- Su, Shinsan M -- de Botton, Stephane -- Yen, Katharine E -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 May 3;340(6132):622-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1234769. Epub 2013 Apr 4.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Agios Pharmaceuticals, Cambridge, MA 02139-4169, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23558173" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Allosteric Site ; Antineoplastic Agents/chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology ; Catalytic Domain ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Proliferation ; Cells, Cultured ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Enzyme Inhibitors/chemistry/metabolism/*pharmacology ; Erythropoiesis/drug effects ; Gene Expression Regulation, Leukemic ; Glutarates/metabolism ; Hematopoiesis/*drug effects ; Humans ; Isocitrate Dehydrogenase/*antagonists & inhibitors/chemistry/*genetics/metabolism ; Leukemia, Erythroblastic, Acute ; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/drug therapy/*enzymology/genetics/pathology ; Molecular Targeted Therapy ; Mutant Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors/chemistry/metabolism ; Phenylurea Compounds/chemistry/metabolism/*pharmacology ; Point Mutation ; Protein Multimerization ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Small Molecule Libraries ; Sulfonamides/chemistry/metabolism/*pharmacology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...