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  • 1
    Keywords: INHIBITOR ; RISK ; TRIAL ; EVENTS ; SERUM-LEVELS ; ARTERY-DISEASE ; MENDELIAN RANDOMIZATION ; HEALTHY-MEN ; EPIC-NORFOLK ; ACUTE CORONARY SYNDROMES
    Abstract: OBJECTIVES: This study sought to investigate the role of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2)-IIA in cardiovascular disease. BACKGROUND: Higher circulating levels of sPLA2-IIA mass or sPLA2 enzyme activity have been associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events. However, it is not clear if this association is causal. A recent phase III clinical trial of an sPLA2 inhibitor (varespladib) was stopped prematurely for lack of efficacy. METHODS: We conducted a Mendelian randomization meta-analysis of 19 general population studies (8,021 incident, 7,513 prevalent major vascular events [MVE] in 74,683 individuals) and 10 acute coronary syndrome (ACS) cohorts (2,520 recurrent MVE in 18,355 individuals) using rs11573156, a variant in PLA2G2A encoding the sPLA2-IIA isoenzyme, as an instrumental variable. RESULTS: PLA2G2A rs11573156 C allele associated with lower circulating sPLA2-IIA mass (38% to 44%) and sPLA2 enzyme activity (3% to 23%) per C allele. The odds ratio (OR) for MVE per rs11573156 C allele was 1.02 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.98 to 1.06) in general populations and 0.96 (95% CI: 0.90 to 1.03) in ACS cohorts. In the general population studies, the OR derived from the genetic instrumental variable analysis for MVE for a 1-log unit lower sPLA2-IIA mass was 1.04 (95% CI: 0.96 to 1.13), and differed from the non-genetic observational estimate (OR: 0.69; 95% CI: 0.61 to 0.79). In the ACS cohorts, both the genetic instrumental variable and observational ORs showed a null association with MVE. Instrumental variable analysis failed to show associations between sPLA2 enzyme activity and MVE. CONCLUSIONS: Reducing sPLA2-IIA mass is unlikely to be a useful therapeutic goal for preventing cardiovascular events.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23916927
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  • 2
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; COHORT ; GENE ; GENES ; HEART ; ASSOCIATION ; IDENTIFICATION ; LINKAGE ANALYSIS ; genetics ; BLOOD-PRESSURE ; HYPERTENSION ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; METAANALYSIS ; duration ; CARDIOMYOPATHY ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; association study ; genetic variation ; COMMON VARIANTS ; Left ventricular hypertrophy ; electrocardiography
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Presence of left ventricular hypertrophy on an ECG (ECG-LVH) is widely assessed clinically and provides prognostic information in some settings. There is evidence for significant heritability of ECG-LVH. We conducted a large-scale gene-centric association analysis of 4 commonly measured indices of ECG-LVH. METHODS AND RESULTS: We calculated the Sokolow-Lyon index, Cornell product, 12-lead QRS voltage sum, and 12-lead QRS voltage product in 10 256 individuals from 3 population-based cohorts and typed their DNA using a customized gene array (the Illumina HumanCVD BeadChip 50K array), containing 49 094 genetic variants in approximately 2100 genes of cardiovascular relevance. We followed-up promising associations in 11 777 additional individuals. We identified and replicated 4 loci associated with ECG-LVH indices: 3p22.2 (SCN5A, rs6797133, P=1.22 x 10(-7)) with Cornell product and 12q13.3 (PTGES3, rs2290893, P=3.74 x 10(-8)), 15q25.2 (NMB, rs2292462, P=3.23 x 10(-9)), and 15q26.3 (IGF1R, rs4966014, P=1.26 x 10(-7)) with the 12-lead QRS voltage sum. The odds ratio of being in the top decile for the 12-lead QRS voltage sum for those carrying 6 trait-raising alleles at the 12q13.3, 15q25.2, and 15q26.3 loci versus those carrying 0 to 1 alleles was 1.60 (95% CI: 1.20 to 2.29). Lead single-nucleotide polymorphisms at the 12q13.3 and 15q25.2 loci showed significant expression quantitative trait loci effects in monocytes. CONCLUSIONS: These findings provide novel insights into the genetic determination of ECG-LVH. The findings could help to improve our understanding of the mechanisms determining this prognostically important trait.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21965548
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  • 3
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: The extent to which diabetes mellitus or hyperglycemia is related to risk of death from cancer or other nonvascular conditions is uncertain. METHODS: We calculated hazard ratios for cause-specific death, according to baseline diabetes status or fasting glucose level, from individual-participant data on 123,205 deaths among 820,900 people in 97 prospective studies. RESULTS: After adjustment for age, sex, smoking status, and body-mass index, hazard ratios among persons with diabetes as compared with persons without diabetes were as follows: 1.80 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.71 to 1.90) for death from any cause, 1.25 (95% CI, 1.19 to 1.31) for death from cancer, 2.32 (95% CI, 2.11 to 2.56) for death from vascular causes, and 1.73 (95% CI, 1.62 to 1.85) for death from other causes. Diabetes (vs. no diabetes) was moderately associated with death from cancers of the liver, pancreas, ovary, colorectum, lung, bladder, and breast. Aside from cancer and vascular disease, diabetes (vs. no diabetes) was also associated with death from renal disease, liver disease, pneumonia and other infectious diseases, mental disorders, nonhepatic digestive diseases, external causes, intentional self-harm, nervous-system disorders, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Hazard ratios were appreciably reduced after further adjustment for glycemia measures, but not after adjustment for systolic blood pressure, lipid levels, inflammation or renal markers. Fasting glucose levels exceeding 100 mg per deciliter (5.6 mmol per liter), but not levels of 70 to 100 mg per deciliter (3.9 to 5.6 mmol per liter), were associated with death. A 50-year-old with diabetes died, on average, 6 years earlier than a counterpart without diabetes, with about 40% of the difference in survival attributable to excess nonvascular deaths. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to vascular disease, diabetes is associated with substantial premature death from several cancers, infectious diseases, external causes, intentional self-harm, and degenerative disorders, independent of several major risk factors. (Funded by the British Heart Foundation and others.).
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21366474
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  • 4
    Keywords: ASSOCIATION ; primary prevention ; COST-EFFECTIVENESS ; inflammation ; CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE ; METAANALYSIS ; PRACTICE GUIDELINES ; STATIN THERAPY ; NONVASCULAR MORTALITY ; RISK PROFILE
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: There is debate about the value of assessing levels of C-reactive protein (CRP) and other biomarkers of inflammation for the prediction of first cardiovascular events. METHODS: We analyzed data from 52 prospective studies that included 246,669 participants without a history of cardiovascular disease to investigate the value of adding CRP or fibrinogen levels to conventional risk factors for the prediction of cardiovascular risk. We calculated measures of discrimination and reclassification during follow-up and modeled the clinical implications of initiation of statin therapy after the assessment of CRP or fibrinogen. RESULTS: The addition of information on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol to a prognostic model for cardiovascular disease that included age, sex, smoking status, blood pressure, history of diabetes, and total cholesterol level increased the C-index, a measure of risk discrimination, by 0.0050. The further addition to this model of information on CRP or fibrinogen increased the C-index by 0.0039 and 0.0027, respectively (P〈0.001), and yielded a net reclassification improvement of 1.52% and 0.83%, respectively, for the predicted 10-year risk categories of "low" (〈10%), "intermediate" (10% to 〈20%), and "high" (〉/=20%) (P〈0.02 for both comparisons). We estimated that among 100,000 adults 40 years of age or older, 15,025 persons would initially be classified as being at intermediate risk for a cardiovascular event if conventional risk factors alone were used to calculate risk. Assuming that statin therapy would be initiated in accordance with Adult Treatment Panel III guidelines (i.e., for persons with a predicted risk of 〉/=20% and for those with certain other risk factors, such as diabetes, irrespective of their 10-year predicted risk), additional targeted assessment of CRP or fibrinogen levels in the 13,199 remaining participants at intermediate risk could help prevent approximately 30 additional cardiovascular events over the course of 10 years. CONCLUSIONS: In a study of people without known cardiovascular disease, we estimated that under current treatment guidelines, assessment of the CRP or fibrinogen level in people at intermediate risk for a cardiovascular event could help prevent one additional event over a period of 10 years for every 400 to 500 people screened. (Funded by the British Heart Foundation and others.).
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 23034020
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