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  • 1
    ISSN: 1438-2385
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; tumor ; CELL ; Germany ; liver ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; TISSUE ; TUMORS ; SURGERY ; PATIENT ; IMPACT ; ACID ; ACIDS ; MALIGNANCIES ; PATTERNS ; PLASMA ; AGE ; GAS ; fatty acids ; DIET ; IMPROVES ; SMALL-INTESTINE ; nutrition ; COMPLICATIONS ; FATTY-ACID ; MALIGNANCY ; PATTERN ; FRACTION ; LEADS ; PHOSPHOLIPIDS ; WEIGHT ; SUPPLEMENTATION ; TUMOR TISSUE ; LEVEL ; methods ; PLASMA-LEVELS ; TISSUE SAMPLES ; USA ; phospholipid ; uptake ; EICOSAPENTAENOIC ACID ; ENTERAL NUTRITION ; EVALUATE ; GUT ; IMMUNONUTRITION ; MAJOR SURGERY ; PARENTERAL FISH-OIL ; POSTOPERATIVE TRAUMA ; TREATED RATS
    Abstract: Background: The uptake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) into the liver, gut mucosa, and tumor tissue and plasma levels after preoperative administration of supplemented enteral nutrition was investigated in patients with malignancies of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The objective of the study was to evaluate the incorporation of preoperatively administrated PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) into cell phospholipids. Methods: Patients undergoing major gastrointestinal surgery (n = 40) were prospectively randomized to receive a PUFA-supplemented liquid oral diet 5 days preoperatively or an isocaloric control diet. The planned diet intake was 1000 mL/d providing 3.7 g of PUFA. The diet was given in addition to the usual hospital diet. The phospholipid fractions in plasma were analyzed on the day of surgery. Tissue samples of liver, gut mucosa (small intestine), and tumor were taken during surgery and homogenized. EPA and DHA content was analyzed using liquid gas chromatography. Results: Both patient groups (PUFA group: n = 20; control group: n = 20) were similar in age, weight, and surgical procedures. As compared with the control group, the PUFA group had significantly increased levels of EPA in liver tissue (0.4 vs 1.3 weight %), gut mucosa (0.3 vs 1.0 weight %), and tumor tissue (0.3 vs 0.8 weight %). Also, the DHA levels in the PUFA group were significantly higher than the control group: liver tissue (4.1 vs 7.5 weight %), gut mucosa (2.1 vs 3.7 weight %) and tumor tissue (1.9 vs 4.2 weight %). Conclusions: This study suggests that administration of PUFA-enriched diets leads to increased incorporation of EPA and DHA not only in liver and gut mucosa tissue, but also in tumor tissue in patients with solid gastrointestinal tumors. Thus, preoperative administration of oral PUFA-enriched diets could have an impact on the postoperative inflammatory response after major abdominal surgery
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15961678
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  • 3
  • 4
    Keywords: Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; POPULATION ; METABOLISM ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; ALPHA ; PLASMA ; Jun ; DIET ; DIETARY ; PREVALENCE ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; antioxidants ; NUTRIENTS ; ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL ; SERUM CONCENTRATIONS ; SERUM ; ADULTS ; HAY-FEVER ; REGRESSION ; RE ; allergic sensitisation ; CHILDHOOD ASTHMA ; LEVEL ; INTERVAL ; FRUITS ; fruits and vegetables ; PARTICIPANTS ; PLASMA-LEVELS ; allergic rhinitis ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; odds ratio ; GAMMA-TOCOPHEROL ; ECOLOGICAL ANALYSIS
    Abstract: Objectives: Antioxidant nutrients like carotenoids, tocopherols and vitamin C have been suggested to protect against allergic rhinitis and allergic sensitisation but scientific evidence is scarce. The aims of the study were to measure the plasma concentration of six carotenoids, alpha- and gamma-tocopherol and vitamin C as biomarkers of the intake, absorption and subsequent metabolism of these nutrients, and to assess their association with allergic rhinitis and sensitisation. Method: Data from a cross-sectional study on representative dietary and lifestyle habits of the population of Bavaria, Germany, were analysed. The plasma levels of six carotenoids (alpha-carotene, P-carotene, lycopene, lutein/zeaxanthin, canthaxanthin and cryptoxanthin) as well as of alpha-tocopherol, gamma-tocopherol and vitamin C were measured in 547 adults aged between 19 and 81 years. Participants with specific serum immunoglobulin E 〉= 700 U l(-1) were categorised as sensitised. The association of plasma antioxidant levels, allergic rhinitis and allergic sensitisation was assessed by means of unconditional logistic regression models. Results: We observed a negative association between plasma total carotenoids and the prevalence of allergic rhinitis, with odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 1.13 (0.54-2.39) for the second, 0.72 (0-33-1-58) for the third and 0.44 (0.19-1.03) for the fourth quartile of total carotenoids concentration (P for trend = 0.0332); results for lycopene failed to reach statistical significance (P = 0.0608). Other single carotenoids, tocopherols and vitamin C were unrelated to allergic rhinitis. Allergic sensitisation was negatively associated with plasma gamma-tocopherol, with odds ratio (95% confidence interval) of 0.92 (0.51-1.65) for the second, 1.00 (0-56-1.80) for the third and 0.45 (0.23-0.88) for the fourth quartile of plasma gamma-tocopherol concentration (P for trend = 0.0410). No other antioxidant was significantly related to allergic sensitisation. Conclusions: High plasma carotenoid concentrations reflecting a diet high in various fruits and vegetables might have a protective effect on allergic rhinitis in adulthood
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16870019
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  • 5
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; CELL ; Germany ; GENE ; ASSOCIATION ; VARIANTS ; ACID ; PLASMA ; MEMBRANE ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; DIET ; lipids ; nutrition ; inflammation ; ADULT ; ADULTS ; VARIANT ; HAPLOTYPES ; ALPHA-LINOLENIC ACID ; polyunsaturated fatty acids ; Erythrocyte membranes ; Bavarian Nutrition Survey II ; Blood phospholipids ; DESATURASE ; EICOSANOIDS ; FADS1 FADS2 gene cluster ; RHINITIS
    Abstract: The present study gives further evidence for the recently found association between variants of the fatty acid desaturase 1 fatty acid desaturase 2 (FADS1 FADS2) gene cluster and PUFA in blood phospholipids and explores this association for cellular fatty acids in erythrocyte membranes. In a subgroup of adults participating in the Bavarian Nutrition Survey 11, a cross-sectional population-based study conducted in Bavaria, Germany, allelic variation in three selected loci of the FADS1 FADS2 gene cluster was analysed and used for haplotype construction. Associations with plasma phospholipid PUFA (it 163) and PUFA in erythrocyte membranes (n 535) were investigated by regression analysis. All haplotypes of the original five-loci haplotypes of our previous study could be replicated. In addition, associations with serum phospholipid PUFA were confirmed in the present data set. Although less pronounced, associations between FADS1 FADS2 haplotypes and PUFA in erythrocyte membranes, particularly arachidonic and dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid, could be established. We provide the first replication of the association of the FADS1 FADS2 gene cluster with PUFA in blood phospholipids. For the first time, such associations were also shown for PUFA in cell membranes
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18479586
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  • 6
    Keywords: COMBINATION ; Germany ; human ; DENSITY ; SYSTEM ; SYSTEMS ; PROTEIN ; MECHANISM ; IONS ; mechanisms ; ACID ; POLYPHENOLS ; QUERCETIN ; LDL ; lipids ; KINETICS ; LIPID-PEROXIDATION ; FLUORESCENCE ; LIPOPROTEINS ; OXIDATION ; nutrition ; antioxidants ; FOOD ; VITAMIN-E ; PHENOLIC-COMPOUNDS ; SINGLE ; lipid peroxidation ; monitoring ; interaction ; FLAVONOIDS ; TOCOPHEROL ; LEVEL ; PHASE ; ABILITY ; ascorbic acid ; INTERACT ; ANTIOXIDANT CAPACITY ; APOLIPOPROTEIN-B ; COPPER-MEDIATED OXIDATION ; HUMAN PLASMA ; low density lipoproteins ; PHENOLIC-ACIDS ; REDOX POTENTIALS ; SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC METHOD
    Abstract: Background Only limited knowledge is available about any interactions between phenolic compounds and other antioxidants in inhibiting LDL oxidation. Many foods and beverages contain high levels of phenolic compounds; therefore, these compounds should not be considered in isolation from each other. Aim of the study The aim of this study was to examine the structure-antioxidant activity relationship of quercetin, caffeic acid, epicatechin, hesperetin and phloretin as well as alpha-tocopherol and ascorbic acid through their ability to interact with copper ions. Methods Isolated human LDL were incubated with single antioxidants or a combination of two and the kinetics of lipid peroxidation were assessed by measurement of conjugated diene formation (lag phase) via monitoring the absorbance at 234 nm after addition of copper ions. In addition, the degree of oxidation of the LDL protein moiety was followed by tryptophan fluorescence and carbonyl content measurements. Results alpha-Tocopherol and ascorbic acid showed a lower antioxidant activity in all test systems as compared to polyphenols at equimolar concentrations. Quercetin was the most effective compound in all three systems (p 〈 0.001 for lag phase and carbonyl content determination). A significant (p 〈 0.001) prolongation of the lag phase was found when combinations of ascorbic acid/quercetin, ascorbic acid/epicatechin, epicatechin/caffeic acid, and quercetin/epicatechin were tested as compared to the sum of the individual effects. Concerning the effects on LDL protein oxidation, the results from carbonyl content and the tryptophan fluorescence measurements showed that the combination of quercetin and caffeic acid revealed the strongest inhibitory effect (p 〈 0.001 carbonyl content; p 〈= 0.002 tryptohan fluorescence) on protein oxidation which was higher than the effect of the single compounds. Conclusions The results of the present study indicate that a combination of different antioxidants can be superior to the action of single antioxidants in protecting LDL lipid and protein moiety against oxidation. However, the substances may act by different antioxidative mechanisms, which are not necessarily complementary
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15827683
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  • 7
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; tumor ; AGENTS ; Germany ; POPULATION ; TUMOR-NECROSIS-FACTOR ; polymorphism ; cytokines ; MEDIATORS ; PLASMA ; AGE ; OBESITY ; smoking ; NECROSIS-FACTOR-ALPHA ; PARAMETERS ; C-REACTIVE PROTEIN ; MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION ; BODY ; RECEPTORS ; body mass index ; TNF-ALPHA ; inflammation ; FACTOR-ALPHA ; MASS INDEX ; CYTOKINE ; WEIGHT ; CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE ; TNF RECEPTOR ; LEVEL ; GENDER ; PLASMA-LEVELS ; BMI ; general population ; NECROSIS ; PROINFLAMMATORY CYTOKINES ; IL-6 ; INFLAMMATORY MARKERS
    Abstract: The cytokines tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), soluble TNF receptors p55 and p75, and interleukin 6 (IL-6) are involved in host defense against several microbiological agents, in the process of inflammation and also in body weight regulation. In the present study, we sought to assess the influence of age, gender, smoking, and body mass index on plasma levels of TNF-alpha, TNF receptors, and IL-6 in more than 550 adult subjects randomly selected from the Bavarian population. None of the cytokine parameters had a normal distribution and all distributions were significantly skewed. The cytokine plasma levels investigated increased significantly with age, while gender had a relatively weaker influence on the plasma levels. Plasma levels of TNF-alpha, TNF receptors, and IL-6 correlated significantly with the BMI. The study provides insights into factors influencing the cytokine levels investigated in a randomly chosen study sample
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17194640
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  • 8
    Keywords: RECEPTOR ; tumor ; FACTOR RECEPTOR ; Germany ; SYSTEM ; DISEASES ; PATIENT ; TUMOR-NECROSIS-FACTOR ; mechanisms ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; ALPHA ; cytokines ; ASSAY ; PLASMA ; AGE ; OBESITY ; NECROSIS-FACTOR-ALPHA ; INVOLVEMENT ; CEREBROSPINAL-FLUID ; BODY ; RECEPTORS ; TNF-ALPHA ; FACTOR-ALPHA ; MASS INDEX ; CYTOKINE ; WEIGHT ; IMMUNE-SYSTEM ; LEVEL ; ASSAYS ; PLASMA-LEVELS ; BMI ; NECROSIS ; SLEEP ; LEPTIN LEVELS
    Abstract: Background: Narcolepsy is a disabling sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Recent studies suggest that the immune system might play a pathogenic role pointing to a possible involvement of inflammatory cytokines. Methods: We investigated a sample of 30 patients with narcolepsy in comparison with 120 sex- and age-matched and 101 sex-, body mass index (BMI)-, and age-matched randomly selected normal controls. In these groups, plasma concentrations of tumor necrosis factor alpha(TNF-alpha) and its soluble receptors p55 and p75 ( soluble TNF receptor [sTNF-R] p55 and sTNF-R p75) were measured using commercial enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Results: The narcoleptic patients showed a significantly higher BMI compared with controls of the same age. Soluble TNF-R p75 levels were consistently elevated in the narcoleptic patients compared with their sex- and age-matched (P = .001) as well as sex-, BMI-, and age-matched counterparts (P =. 003). Female narcoleptic patients exhibited higher sTNF-R p55 levels compared with their sex- and age-matched controls (P =. 01), but this difference disappeared when comparing patients with sex-, BMI-, and age-matched normal controls. Tumor necrosis factor alpha levels did not differ significantly between groups. Conclusion: Narcoleptic patients show increased plasma levels of sTNF-R p75, suggesting a functional alteration of the TNF-alpha cytokine system, further corroborating a possible pathogenic role of the immune system in this sleep disorder
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16983052
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  • 9
    Keywords: APOPTOSIS ; CELLS ; BLOOD ; Germany ; human ; ENZYMES ; HUMANS ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; DIET ; BODY ; CONSUMPTION ; VEGETABLES ; FOOD ; MASS INDEX ; WEIGHT ; FLAVONOIDS ; HEALTHY-SUBJECTS ; FRUITS ; PARTICIPANTS ; healthy subjects ; INGESTION ; apigenin ; apigenin,absorption ; apigenin,humans ; apigenin-free diet ; apiin ; luteolin-free diet ; parsley
    Abstract: Aim: Absorption and excretion of apigenin after the ingestion of apiin-rich food, i.e. parsley, was tested. Methods: Eleven healthy subjects (5 women, 6 men) in the age range of 23-41 years and with an average body mass index of 23.9 +/- 4.1 kg/m(2) took part in this study. After an apigenin- and luteolin-free diet, a single oral bolus of 2 g blanched parsley (corresponding to 65.8 +/- 15.5 mu mol apigenin) per kilogram body weight was consumed. Blood samples were taken at 0, 4, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 28 h after parsley consumption and 24-hour urine samples were collected. Apigenin was analyzed in plasma, urine and red blood cells by means of HPLC-ECD. Results:On average, a maximum apigenin plasma concentration of 127 +/- 81 nmol/l was reached after 7.2 +/- 1.3 h with a high range of variation between subjects. For all participants, plasma apigenin concentration rose after bolus ingestion and fell within 28 h under the detection limit (2.3 nmol/1). The average apigenin content in 24-hour urine was 144 +/- 110 nmol/24 h corresponding to 0.22 +/- 0.16% of the ingested dose. The flavone could be detected in red blood cells without showing close-response characteristics. Conclusions: A small portion of apigenin provided by food reaches the human circulation and, therefore, may reveal biological effects
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16407641
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  • 10
    Keywords: Germany ; METABOLISM ; SURGERY ; PATIENT ; SERA ; IMPACT ; treatment ; ACID ; ACIDS ; ERYTHROCYTES ; PLASMA ; MEMBRANE ; GAS ; PARAMETERS ; SAFETY ; DOUBLE-BLIND ; nutrition ; ARACHIDONIC-ACID ; MEMBRANES ; COMPLICATIONS ; SERUM ; PATTERN ; LEADS ; LEVEL ; methods ; EVENTS ; USA ; prospective ; uptake ; EICOSAPENTAENOIC ACID ; ENTERAL NUTRITION ; MAJOR SURGERY ; POSTOPERATIVE TRAUMA ; TREATED RATS ; DOCOSAHEXAENOIC ACID ; colorectal ; N-3 ; lipid ; polyunsaturated fatty acid ; ESTERS ; CARE UNIT ENVIRONMENT ; CONTAINING LIPID EMULSIONS ; FISH-OIL EMULSION
    Abstract: Background: The clinical safety and the uptake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) into the serum phospholipids and erythrocyte membranes after administration of fish-oil-supplemented parenteral nutrition (PN) was investigated in colorectal surgical patients. Methods: Forty patients undergoing colorectal surgery (n = 40) and with an indication for PN were enrolled in a prospective, double-blind, randomized study to receive an w-3 PUFA-supplemented 20% lipid emulsion (Lipoplus; B. Braun Melsungen, Melsungen, Germany; test group, n = 19) for 5 days postoperatively. The control group received a standard 20% fat emulsion (Lipofundin MCT/LCT, B. Braun Melsungen, Melsungen, Germany, control group, n = 21). Clinical outcome parameters and safety were assessed by means of adverse events recording clinical parameters and hematologic analyses. The contents of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), as well as arachidonic acid (AA), in phospholipid fractions in plasma and in erythrocytes were analyzed preoperatively, on postoperative days 1, 6, and 10 using liquid gas chromatography. Results: Both fat emulsions were well tolerated, and none of the adverse events was considered to be related to treatment. Postoperative infectious complications occurred in 4 patients of the w-3 PUFA group vs 7 patients in the control group. As compared with the control group, the w-3 PUFA group had significantly increased levels of EPA in the membranes of the erythrocytes in postoperative day 6 (2.0% +/- 0.9% vs 0.8% +/- 0.5% fatty acid methyl esters, [FAME]) and postoperative day 10 (2.1% +/- 0.8% vs 0.9% +/- 0.7% FAME, p 〈.05). Also, the EPA levels in the serum phospholipids were significantly higher than in the control group on the same postoperative days (7.0% +/- 2.6% vs 1.3% +/- 0.8% and 3.6% +/- 1.0% vs 1.0% 0.4% FAME, p 〈.05). The DHA levels in the serum phospholipids were significantly higher in the (o-3 PUFA group compared with the control on postoperative days 6 and 10 (11.8% +/- 1.9% vs 8.4% +/- 1.5% and 11.2% +/- 1.6% vs 8.5% +/- 1.4% FAME, p 〈.05). AA levels were not significantly different in the both groups. Conclusions: i2-3-fatty-acids-supplemented fat emulsions for parenteral administration are safe and very well tolerated. This study demonstrates that parenteral administration of omega-3-PUFA-enriched fat emulsions leads to increased incorporation of EPA and DHA into phospholipids in serum and erythrocytes, whereas AA levels remain unchanged. Thus, postoperative parenteral administration of omega-3-PUFA-enriched lipid emulsions could have an impact on the postoperative inflammatory response after abdominal surgery and could be used in standard postoperative care when PN is indicated
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17202435
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