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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-12-14
    Description: The clinical efficacy and safety of a drug is determined by its activity profile across many proteins in the proteome. However, designing drugs with a specific multi-target profile is both complex and difficult. Therefore methods to design drugs rationally a priori against profiles of several proteins would have immense value in drug discovery. Here we describe a new approach for the automated design of ligands against profiles of multiple drug targets. The method is demonstrated by the evolution of an approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitor drug into brain-penetrable ligands with either specific polypharmacology or exquisite selectivity profiles for G-protein-coupled receptors. Overall, 800 ligand-target predictions of prospectively designed ligands were tested experimentally, of which 75% were confirmed to be correct. We also demonstrate target engagement in vivo. The approach can be a useful source of drug leads when multi-target profiles are required to achieve either selectivity over other drug targets or a desired polypharmacology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3653568/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3653568/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Besnard, Jeremy -- Ruda, Gian Filippo -- Setola, Vincent -- Abecassis, Keren -- Rodriguiz, Ramona M -- Huang, Xi-Ping -- Norval, Suzanne -- Sassano, Maria F -- Shin, Antony I -- Webster, Lauren A -- Simeons, Frederick R C -- Stojanovski, Laste -- Prat, Annik -- Seidah, Nabil G -- Constam, Daniel B -- Bickerton, G Richard -- Read, Kevin D -- Wetsel, William C -- Gilbert, Ian H -- Roth, Bryan L -- Hopkins, Andrew L -- 083481/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- BB/FOF/PF/15/09/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/J010510/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- MH082441/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA017204/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH061887/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U19 MH082441/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- WT 083481/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2012 Dec 13;492(7428):215-20. doi: 10.1038/nature11691.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Biological Chemistry and Drug Discovery, College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23235874" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Automation ; Drug Delivery Systems ; *Drug Design ; Female ; *Ligands ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Models, Theoretical ; Pharmacological Phenomena ; Reproducibility of Results
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-05-03
    Description: The smoothened (SMO) receptor, a key signal transducer in the hedgehog signalling pathway, is responsible for the maintenance of normal embryonic development and is implicated in carcinogenesis. It is classified as a class frizzled (class F) G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR), although the canonical hedgehog signalling pathway involves the GLI transcription factors and the sequence similarity with class A GPCRs is less than 10%. Here we report the crystal structure of the transmembrane domain of the human SMO receptor bound to the small-molecule antagonist LY2940680 at 2.5 A resolution. Although the SMO receptor shares the seven-transmembrane helical fold, most of the conserved motifs for class A GPCRs are absent, and the structure reveals an unusually complex arrangement of long extracellular loops stabilized by four disulphide bonds. The ligand binds at the extracellular end of the seven-transmembrane-helix bundle and forms extensive contacts with the loops.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3657389/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3657389/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wang, Chong -- Wu, Huixian -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Han, Gye Won -- Huang, Xi-Ping -- Liu, Wei -- Siu, Fai Yiu -- Roth, Bryan L -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Stevens, Raymond C -- F32 DK088392/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA017204/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA027170/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA27170/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH061887/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01MH61887/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U19 MH082441/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U19 MH82441/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 May 16;497(7449):338-43. doi: 10.1038/nature12167. Epub 2013 May 1.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23636324" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Motifs ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Antineoplastic Agents/*chemistry/metabolism ; Binding Sites ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disulfides/chemistry ; Frizzled Receptors/chemistry/classification ; Humans ; Ligands ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Phthalazines/*chemistry/metabolism ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled/*chemistry/classification/metabolism ; Structural Homology, Protein
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2015-11-10
    Description: At least 120 non-olfactory G-protein-coupled receptors in the human genome are 'orphans' for which endogenous ligands are unknown, and many have no selective ligands, hindering the determination of their biological functions and clinical relevance. Among these is GPR68, a proton receptor that lacks small molecule modulators for probing its biology. Using yeast-based screens against GPR68, here we identify the benzodiazepine drug lorazepam as a non-selective GPR68 positive allosteric modulator. More than 3,000 GPR68 homology models were refined to recognize lorazepam in a putative allosteric site. Docking 3.1 million molecules predicted new GPR68 modulators, many of which were confirmed in functional assays. One potent GPR68 modulator, ogerin, suppressed recall in fear conditioning in wild-type but not in GPR68-knockout mice. The same approach led to the discovery of allosteric agonists and negative allosteric modulators for GPR65. Combining physical and structure-based screening may be broadly useful for ligand discovery for understudied and orphan GPCRs.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Huang, Xi-Ping -- Karpiak, Joel -- Kroeze, Wesley K -- Zhu, Hu -- Chen, Xin -- Moy, Sheryl S -- Saddoris, Kara A -- Nikolova, Viktoriya D -- Farrell, Martilias S -- Wang, Sheng -- Mangano, Thomas J -- Deshpande, Deepak A -- Jiang, Alice -- Penn, Raymond B -- Jin, Jian -- Koller, Beverly H -- Kenakin, Terry -- Shoichet, Brian K -- Roth, Bryan L -- GM59957/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM71896/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P01 HL114471/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA017204/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA027170/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- U01 MH104974/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U19MH082441/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U54 HD079124/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Nov 26;527(7579):477-83. doi: 10.1038/nature15699. Epub 2015 Nov 9.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pharmacology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, 27599-7365, USA. ; National Institute of Mental Health Psychoactive Drug Screening Program (NIMH PDSP), School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7365, USA. ; Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, University of California at San Francisco, Byers Hall, 1700 4th Street, San Francisco, California 94158-2550, USA. ; Center for Integrative Chemical Biology and Drug Discovery (CICBDD), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7363, USA. ; Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, Eshelman School of Pharmacy, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7360, USA. ; Department of Psychiatry and Carolina Institute for Developmental Disabilities (CIDD), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7146, USA. ; Center for Translational Medicine and Department of Medicine, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107, USA. ; Department of Genetics, School of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-7264, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26550826" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Allosteric Regulation/drug effects ; Allosteric Site ; Animals ; Anti-Anxiety Agents/analysis/chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology ; Benzyl Alcohols/analysis/*chemistry/metabolism/*pharmacology ; Conditioning, Classical ; *Drug Discovery ; Fear ; Female ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Ligands ; Lorazepam/analysis/*chemistry/metabolism/*pharmacology ; Male ; Memory/drug effects ; Mice ; Mice, Knockout ; Models, Molecular ; Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled/agonists/antagonists & ; inhibitors/chemistry/deficiency/*metabolism ; Signal Transduction/drug effects ; Triazines/analysis/*chemistry/metabolism/*pharmacology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-03-23
    Description: Drugs active at G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) can differentially modulate either canonical or noncanonical signaling pathways via a phenomenon known as functional selectivity or biased signaling. We report biochemical studies showing that the hallucinogen lysergic acid diethylamide, its precursor ergotamine (ERG), and related ergolines display strong functional selectivity for beta-arrestin signaling at the 5-HT2B 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) receptor, whereas they are relatively unbiased at the 5-HT1B receptor. To investigate the structural basis for biased signaling, we determined the crystal structure of the human 5-HT2B receptor bound to ERG and compared it with the 5-HT1B/ERG structure. Given the relatively poor understanding of GPCR structure and function to date, insight into different GPCR signaling pathways is important to better understand both adverse and favorable therapeutic activities.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3644390/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3644390/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wacker, Daniel -- Wang, Chong -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Han, Gye Won -- Huang, Xi-Ping -- Vardy, Eyal -- McCorvy, John D -- Jiang, Yi -- Chu, Meihua -- Siu, Fai Yiu -- Liu, Wei -- Xu, H Eric -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Roth, Bryan L -- Stevens, Raymond C -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK071662/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH061887/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH61887/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U19 MH082441/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U19 MH82441/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Y1-CO-1020/CO/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Y1-GM-1104/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 May 3;340(6132):615-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1232808. Epub 2013 Mar 21.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23519215" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Motifs ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Arrestin/metabolism ; Arrestins/metabolism ; Binding Sites ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Ergolines/chemistry/metabolism ; Ergotamine/chemistry/*metabolism ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Ligands ; Lysergic Acid Diethylamide/chemistry/metabolism ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT1B/chemistry/*metabolism ; Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT2B/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Receptors, Serotonin/chemistry/metabolism ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2012-03-23
    Description: Opioid receptors mediate the actions of endogenous and exogenous opioids on many physiological processes, including the regulation of pain, respiratory drive, mood, and--in the case of kappa-opioid receptor (kappa-OR)--dysphoria and psychotomimesis. Here we report the crystal structure of the human kappa-OR in complex with the selective antagonist JDTic, arranged in parallel dimers, at 2.9 A resolution. The structure reveals important features of the ligand-binding pocket that contribute to the high affinity and subtype selectivity of JDTic for the human kappa-OR. Modelling of other important kappa-OR-selective ligands, including the morphinan-derived antagonists norbinaltorphimine and 5'-guanidinonaltrindole, and the diterpene agonist salvinorin A analogue RB-64, reveals both common and distinct features for binding these diverse chemotypes. Analysis of site-directed mutagenesis and ligand structure-activity relationships confirms the interactions observed in the crystal structure, thereby providing a molecular explanation for kappa-OR subtype selectivity, and essential insights for the design of compounds with new pharmacological properties targeting the human kappa-OR.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356457/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356457/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wu, Huixian -- Wacker, Daniel -- Mileni, Mauro -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Han, Gye Won -- Vardy, Eyal -- Liu, Wei -- Thompson, Aaron A -- Huang, Xi-Ping -- Carroll, F Ivy -- Mascarella, S Wayne -- Westkaemper, Richard B -- Mosier, Philip D -- Roth, Bryan L -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Stevens, Raymond C -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073197-08/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA009045/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA009045-17/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA017204/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA017624/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA027170/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618-02/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Y1-CO-1020/CO/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Y1-GM-1104/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Mar 21;485(7398):327-32. doi: 10.1038/nature10939.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22437504" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Binding Sites ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Diterpenes, Clerodane/chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology ; Guanidines/chemistry ; Humans ; Models, Molecular ; Morphinans/chemistry ; Mutagenesis, Site-Directed ; Naltrexone/analogs & derivatives/chemistry/metabolism ; Piperidines/*chemistry/pharmacology ; Protein Conformation ; Receptors, Adrenergic, beta-2/chemistry ; Receptors, CXCR4/chemistry/metabolism ; Receptors, Opioid, kappa/*antagonists & inhibitors/*chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Structure-Activity Relationship ; Tetrahydroisoquinolines/*chemistry/pharmacology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2012-05-19
    Description: Members of the opioid receptor family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are found throughout the peripheral and central nervous system, where they have key roles in nociception and analgesia. Unlike the 'classical' opioid receptors, delta, kappa and mu (delta-OR, kappa-OR and mu-OR), which were delineated by pharmacological criteria in the 1970s and 1980s, the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide receptor (NOP, also known as ORL-1) was discovered relatively recently by molecular cloning and characterization of an orphan GPCR. Although it shares high sequence similarity with classical opioid GPCR subtypes ( approximately 60%), NOP has a markedly distinct pharmacology, featuring activation by the endogenous peptide N/OFQ, and unique selectivity for exogenous ligands. Here we report the crystal structure of human NOP, solved in complex with the peptide mimetic antagonist compound-24 (C-24) (ref. 4), revealing atomic details of ligand-receptor recognition and selectivity. Compound-24 mimics the first four amino-terminal residues of the NOP-selective peptide antagonist UFP-101, a close derivative of N/OFQ, and provides important clues to the binding of these peptides. The X-ray structure also shows substantial conformational differences in the pocket regions between NOP and the classical opioid receptors kappa (ref. 5) and mu (ref. 6), and these are probably due to a small number of residues that vary between these receptors. The NOP-compound-24 structure explains the divergent selectivity profile of NOP and provides a new structural template for the design of NOP ligands.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356928/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356928/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Thompson, Aaron A -- Liu, Wei -- Chun, Eugene -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Wu, Huixian -- Vardy, Eyal -- Huang, Xi-Ping -- Trapella, Claudio -- Guerrini, Remo -- Calo, Girolamo -- Roth, Bryan L -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Stevens, Raymond C -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073197-08/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA017204/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA017204-08/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA027170/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA027170-03/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA27170/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618-02/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Y1-CO-1020/CO/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Y1-GM-1104/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 May 16;485(7398):395-9. doi: 10.1038/nature11085.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22596163" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Binding Sites ; Biomimetic Materials/*chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Ligands ; Models, Molecular ; Narcotic Antagonists ; Opioid Peptides/*chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology ; Piperidines/*chemistry/*metabolism/pharmacology ; Protein Conformation ; Receptors, Opioid/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Receptors, Opioid, kappa/chemistry/metabolism ; Spiro Compounds/*chemistry/*metabolism/pharmacology ; Substrate Specificity
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-01-15
    Description: Opioids represent widely prescribed and abused medications, although their signal transduction mechanisms are not well understood. Here we present the 1.8 A high-resolution crystal structure of the human delta-opioid receptor (delta-OR), revealing the presence and fundamental role of a sodium ion in mediating allosteric control of receptor functional selectivity and constitutive activity. The distinctive delta-OR sodium ion site architecture is centrally located in a polar interaction network in the seven-transmembrane bundle core, with the sodium ion stabilizing a reduced agonist affinity state, and thereby modulating signal transduction. Site-directed mutagenesis and functional studies reveal that changing the allosteric sodium site residue Asn 131 to an alanine or a valine augments constitutive beta-arrestin-mediated signalling. Asp95Ala, Asn310Ala and Asn314Ala mutations transform classical delta-opioid antagonists such as naltrindole into potent beta-arrestin-biased agonists. The data establish the molecular basis for allosteric sodium ion control in opioid signalling, revealing that sodium-coordinating residues act as 'efficacy switches' at a prototypic G-protein-coupled receptor.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3931418/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3931418/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Fenalti, Gustavo -- Giguere, Patrick M -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Huang, Xi-Ping -- Thompson, Aaron A -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Roth, Bryan L -- Stevens, Raymond C -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA017204/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- U19 MH082441/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Y1-CO-1020/CO/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Y1-GM-1104/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Feb 13;506(7487):191-6. doi: 10.1038/nature12944. Epub 2014 Jan 12.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2]. ; 1] National Institute of Mental Health Psychoactive Drug Screening Program and Department of Pharmacology and Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Medical School, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA [2]. ; Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; National Institute of Mental Health Psychoactive Drug Screening Program and Department of Pharmacology and Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Medical School, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24413399" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Allosteric Regulation/drug effects/genetics ; Allosteric Site/drug effects/genetics ; Arrestins/metabolism ; Asparagine/genetics/metabolism ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Humans ; Ligands ; Models, Molecular ; Mutagenesis, Site-Directed ; Naltrexone/analogs & derivatives/chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology ; Narcotic Antagonists/chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology ; Receptors, Opioid, delta/agonists/antagonists & ; inhibitors/*chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; *Signal Transduction/drug effects ; Sodium/metabolism/pharmacology ; Structure-Activity Relationship
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2016-05-05
    Description: Major depressive disorder affects around 16 per cent of the world population at some point in their lives. Despite the availability of numerous monoaminergic-based antidepressants, most patients require several weeks, if not months, to respond to these treatments, and many patients never attain sustained remission of their symptoms. The non-competitive, glutamatergic NMDAR (N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor) antagonist (R,S)-ketamine exerts rapid and sustained antidepressant effects after a single dose in patients with depression, but its use is associated with undesirable side effects. Here we show that the metabolism of (R,S)-ketamine to (2S,6S;2R,6R)-hydroxynorketamine (HNK) is essential for its antidepressant effects, and that the (2R,6R)-HNK enantiomer exerts behavioural, electroencephalographic, electrophysiological and cellular antidepressant-related actions in mice. These antidepressant actions are independent of NMDAR inhibition but involve early and sustained activation of AMPARs (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors). We also establish that (2R,6R)-HNK lacks ketamine-related side effects. Our data implicate a novel mechanism underlying the antidepressant properties of (R,S)-ketamine and have relevance for the development of next-generation, rapid-acting antidepressants.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zanos, Panos -- Moaddel, Ruin -- Morris, Patrick J -- Georgiou, Polymnia -- Fischell, Jonathan -- Elmer, Greg I -- Alkondon, Manickavasagom -- Yuan, Peixiong -- Pribut, Heather J -- Singh, Nagendra S -- Dossou, Katina S S -- Fang, Yuhong -- Huang, Xi-Ping -- Mayo, Cheryl L -- Wainer, Irving W -- Albuquerque, Edson X -- Thompson, Scott M -- Thomas, Craig J -- Zarate, Carlos A Jr -- Gould, Todd D -- HHSN-271-2008-025C/PHS HHS/ -- HHSN271201000008I/PHS HHS/ -- MH086828/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- MH099345/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- MH107615/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 May 4;533(7604):481-6. doi: 10.1038/nature17998.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Psychiatry, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA. ; Biomedical Research Center, National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health, Baltimore, Maryland 21224, USA. ; Division of Preclinical Innovation, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland 20850, USA. ; Department of Physiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA. ; Department of Pharmacology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA. ; Maryland Psychiatric Research Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21228, USA. ; Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Division of Translational Toxicology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA. ; Experimental Therapeutics and Pathophysiology Branch, Intramural Research Program, National Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; NIMH Psychoactive Drug Screening Program, Department of Pharmacology and Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill Medical School, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27516, USA. ; Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA. ; Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland 21201, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27144355" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2013-03-23
    Description: Serotonin or 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) regulates a wide spectrum of human physiology through the 5-HT receptor family. We report the crystal structures of the human 5-HT1B G protein-coupled receptor bound to the agonist antimigraine medications ergotamine and dihydroergotamine. The structures reveal similar binding modes for these ligands, which occupy the orthosteric pocket and an extended binding pocket close to the extracellular loops. The orthosteric pocket is formed by residues conserved in the 5-HT receptor family, clarifying the family-wide agonist activity of 5-HT. Compared with the structure of the 5-HT2B receptor, the 5-HT1B receptor displays a 3 angstrom outward shift at the extracellular end of helix V, resulting in a more open extended pocket that explains subtype selectivity. Together with docking and mutagenesis studies, these structures provide a comprehensive structural basis for understanding receptor-ligand interactions and designing subtype-selective serotonergic drugs.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3644373/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3644373/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wang, Chong -- Jiang, Yi -- Ma, Jinming -- Wu, Huixian -- Wacker, Daniel -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Han, Gye Won -- Liu, Wei -- Huang, Xi-Ping -- Vardy, Eyal -- McCorvy, John D -- Gao, Xiang -- Zhou, X Edward -- Melcher, Karsten -- Zhang, Chenghai -- Bai, Fang -- Yang, Huaiyu -- Yang, Linlin -- Jiang, Hualiang -- Roth, Bryan L -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Stevens, Raymond C -- Xu, H Eric -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA027170/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA27170/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK071662/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH061887/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH61887/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U19 MH082441/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U19 MH82441/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Y1-CO-1020/CO/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Y1-GM-1104/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 May 3;340(6132):610-4. doi: 10.1126/science.1232807. Epub 2013 Mar 21.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Integrative Structural and Computational Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23519210" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Binding Sites ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Dihydroergotamine/chemistry/*metabolism ; Ergotamine/chemistry/*metabolism ; Humans ; Hydrogen Bonding ; Hydrophobic and Hydrophilic Interactions ; Ligands ; Lysergic Acid Diethylamide/chemistry/metabolism ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Docking Simulation ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutagenesis ; Norfenfluramine/chemistry/metabolism ; Pindolol/analogs & derivatives/chemistry/metabolism ; Propranolol/chemistry/metabolism ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Folding ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Receptor, Serotonin, 5-HT1B/*chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; Serotonin 5-HT1 Receptor Agonists/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Tryptamines/chemistry/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2018-01-03
    Description: Although cilia loss and cell transformation are frequently observed in the early stage of tumorigenesis, the roles of cilia in cell transformation are unknown. In this study, disrupted ciliogenesis was observed in cancer cells and pancreatic cancer tissues, which facilitated oncogene-induced transformation of normal pancreatic cells (HPDE6C7) and NIH3T3 cells through activating the mevalonate (MVA) pathway. Disruption of ciliogenesis up-regulated MVA enzymes through β catenin–T cell factor (TCF) signaling, which synchronized with sterol regulatory element binding transcription factor 2 (SREBP2), and the regulation of MVA by β-catenin–TCF signaling was recapitulated in a mouse model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) and human PDAC samples. Moreover, disruption of ciliogenesis by depleting Tg737 dramatically promoted tumorigenesis in the PDAC mouse model, driven by Kras G12D , which was inhibited by statin, an inhibitor of the MVA pathway. Collectively, this study emphasizes the crucial roles of cilia in governing the early steps of the transformation by activating the MVA pathway, suggesting that statin has therapeutic potential for pancreatic cancer treatment.
    Keywords: Solid Tumors, Metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0022-1007
    Electronic ISSN: 1540-9538
    Topics: Medicine
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