Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Proceed order?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-01-04
    Description: Purpose: Lyso-thermosensitive liposomal doxorubicin (LTLD) consists of doxorubicin contained within a heat-sensitive liposome. When heated to ≥40°C, LTLD locally releases a high concentration of doxorubicin. We aimed to determine whether adding LTLD improves the efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions with a maximum diameter ( d max ) of 3 to 7 cm. Experimental Design: The HEAT Study was a randomized, double-blind, dummy-controlled trial of RFA ± LTLD. The 701 enrolled patients had to have ≤4 unresectable HCC lesions, at least one of which had a d max of 3 to 7 cm. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS) and a key secondary endpoint was overall survival (OS). Post hoc subset analyses investigated whether RFA duration was associated with efficacy. Results: The primary endpoint was not met; in intention-to-treat analysis, the PFS HR of RFA + LTLD versus RFA alone was 0.96 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.79-1.18; P = 0.71], and the OS HR ratio was 0.95 (95% CI, 0.76–1.20; P = 0.67). Among 285 patients with a solitary HCC lesion who received ≥45 minutes RFA dwell time, the OS HR was 0.63 (95% CI, 0.41–0.96; P 〈 0.05) in favor of combination therapy. RFA + LTLD had reversible myelosuppression similar to free doxorubicin. Conclusions: Adding LTLD to RFA was safe but did not increase PFS or OS in the overall study population. However, consistent with LTLD's heat-based mechanism of action, subgroup analysis suggested that RFA + LTLD efficacy is improved when RFA dwell time for a solitary lesion ≥45 minutes. Clin Cancer Res; 24(1); 73–83. ©2017 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1078-0432
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3265
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-02-17
    Description: Spin resonance of individual spin centers allows applications ranging from quantum information technology to atomic-scale magnetometry. To protect the quantum properties of a spin, control over its local environment, including energy relaxation and decoherence processes, is crucial. However, in most existing architectures, the environment remains fixed by the crystal structure and electrical contacts. Recently, spin-polarized scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), in combination with electron spin resonance (ESR), allowed the study of single adatoms and inter-atomic coupling with an unprecedented combination of spatial and energy resolution. We elucidate and control the interplay of an Fe single spin with its atomic-scale environment by precisely tuning the phase coherence time T 2 using the STM tip as a variable electrode. We find that the decoherence rate is the sum of two main contributions. The first scales linearly with tunnel current and shows that, on average, every tunneling electron causes one dephasing event. The second, effective even without current, arises from thermally activated spin-flip processes of tip spins. Understanding these interactions allows us to maximize T 2 and improve the energy resolution. It also allows us to maximize the amplitude of the ESR signal, which supports measurements even at elevated temperatures as high as 4 K. Thus, ESR-STM allows control of quantum coherence in individual, electrically accessible spins.
    Electronic ISSN: 2375-2548
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-10-05
    Description: Grain boundaries in graphene are formed by the joining of islands during the initial growth stage, and these boundaries govern transport properties and related device performance. Although information on the atomic rearrangement at graphene grain boundaries can be obtained using transmission electron microscopy and scanning tunnelling microscopy, large-scale information regarding the distribution of graphene grain boundaries is not easily accessible. Here we use optical microscopy to observe the grain boundaries of large-area graphene (grown on copper foil) directly, without transfer of the graphene. This imaging technique was realized by selectively oxidizing the underlying copper foil through graphene grain boundaries functionalized with O and OH radicals generated by ultraviolet irradiation under moisture-rich ambient conditions: selective diffusion of oxygen radicals through OH-functionalized defect sites was demonstrated by density functional calculations. The sheet resistance of large-area graphene decreased as the graphene grain sizes increased, but no strong correlation with the grain size of the copper was revealed, in contrast to a previous report. Furthermore, the influence of graphene grain boundaries on crack propagation (initialized by bending) and termination was clearly visualized using our technique. Our approach can be used as a simple protocol for evaluating the grain boundaries of other two-dimensional layered structures, such as boron nitride and exfoliated clays.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Duong, Dinh Loc -- Han, Gang Hee -- Lee, Seung Mi -- Gunes, Fethullah -- Kim, Eun Sung -- Kim, Sung Tae -- Kim, Heetae -- Ta, Quang Huy -- So, Kang Pyo -- Yoon, Seok Jun -- Chae, Seung Jin -- Jo, Young Woo -- Park, Min Ho -- Chae, Sang Hoon -- Lim, Seong Chu -- Choi, Jae Young -- Lee, Young Hee -- England -- Nature. 2012 Oct 11;490(7419):235-9. doi: 10.1038/nature11562. Epub 2012 Oct 3.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Sungkyunkwan Advanced Institute of Nanotechnology, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746, South Korea.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23034653" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2011-11-19
    Description: As silicon-based electronics approach the limit of improvements to performance and capacity through dimensional scaling, attention in the semiconductor field has turned to graphene, a single layer of carbon atoms arranged in a honeycomb lattice. Its high mobility of charge carriers (electrons and holes) could lead to its use in the next generation of high-performance devices. Graphene is unlikely to replace silicon completely, however, because of the poor on/off current ratio resulting from its zero bandgap. But it could be used to improve silicon-based devices, in particular in high-speed electronics and optical modulators.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kim, Kinam -- Choi, Jae-Young -- Kim, Taek -- Cho, Seong-Ho -- Chung, Hyun-Jong -- England -- Nature. 2011 Nov 16;479(7373):338-44. doi: 10.1038/nature10680.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology (SAIT), Samsung Electronics, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-712, South Korea. kn_kim@samsung.com〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22094694" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2011-08-26
    Description: Vibrio cholerae is a globally important pathogen that is endemic in many areas of the world and causes 3-5 million reported cases of cholera every year. Historically, there have been seven acknowledged cholera pandemics; recent outbreaks in Zimbabwe and Haiti are included in the seventh and ongoing pandemic. Only isolates in serogroup O1 (consisting of two biotypes known as 'classical' and 'El Tor') and the derivative O139 can cause epidemic cholera. It is believed that the first six cholera pandemics were caused by the classical biotype, but El Tor has subsequently spread globally and replaced the classical biotype in the current pandemic. Detailed molecular epidemiological mapping of cholera has been compromised by a reliance on sub-genomic regions such as mobile elements to infer relationships, making El Tor isolates associated with the seventh pandemic seem superficially diverse. To understand the underlying phylogeny of the lineage responsible for the current pandemic, we identified high-resolution markers (single nucleotide polymorphisms; SNPs) in 154 whole-genome sequences of globally and temporally representative V. cholerae isolates. Using this phylogeny, we show here that the seventh pandemic has spread from the Bay of Bengal in at least three independent but overlapping waves with a common ancestor in the 1950s, and identify several transcontinental transmission events. Additionally, we show how the acquisition of the SXT family of antibiotic resistance elements has shaped pandemic spread, and show that this family was first acquired at least ten years before its discovery in V. cholerae.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3736323/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3736323/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Mutreja, Ankur -- Kim, Dong Wook -- Thomson, Nicholas R -- Connor, Thomas R -- Lee, Je Hee -- Kariuki, Samuel -- Croucher, Nicholas J -- Choi, Seon Young -- Harris, Simon R -- Lebens, Michael -- Niyogi, Swapan Kumar -- Kim, Eun Jin -- Ramamurthy, T -- Chun, Jongsik -- Wood, James L N -- Clemens, John D -- Czerkinsky, Cecil -- Nair, G Balakrish -- Holmgren, Jan -- Parkhill, Julian -- Dougan, Gordon -- 076962/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 076964/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2011 Aug 24;477(7365):462-5. doi: 10.1038/nature10392.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21866102" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Cholera/*epidemiology/microbiology/*transmission ; Genome, Bacterial/genetics ; Haiti/epidemiology ; Humans ; Likelihood Functions ; Molecular Epidemiology ; Pandemics/*statistics & numerical data ; Phylogeny ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/genetics ; Vibrio cholerae/classification/*genetics/*isolation & purification ; Zimbabwe/epidemiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2013-05-17
    Description: Gene expression differs among individuals and populations and is thought to be a major determinant of phenotypic variation. Although variation and genetic loci responsible for RNA expression levels have been analysed extensively in human populations, our knowledge is limited regarding the differences in human protein abundance and the genetic basis for this difference. Variation in messenger RNA expression is not a perfect surrogate for protein expression because the latter is influenced by an array of post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms, and, empirically, the correlation between protein and mRNA levels is generally modest. Here we used isobaric tag-based quantitative mass spectrometry to determine relative protein levels of 5,953 genes in lymphoblastoid cell lines from 95 diverse individuals genotyped in the HapMap Project. We found that protein levels are heritable molecular phenotypes that exhibit considerable variation between individuals, populations and sexes. Levels of specific sets of proteins involved in the same biological process covary among individuals, indicating that these processes are tightly regulated at the protein level. We identified cis-pQTLs (protein quantitative trait loci), including variants not detected by previous transcriptome studies. This study demonstrates the feasibility of high-throughput human proteome quantification that, when integrated with DNA variation and transcriptome information, adds a new dimension to the characterization of gene expression regulation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3789121/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3789121/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wu, Linfeng -- Candille, Sophie I -- Choi, Yoonha -- Xie, Dan -- Jiang, Lihua -- Li-Pook-Than, Jennifer -- Tang, Hua -- Snyder, Michael -- P50 HG002357/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM073059/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U01 HL107393/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jul 4;499(7456):79-82. doi: 10.1038/nature12223. Epub 2013 May 15.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Genetics, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23676674" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Cell Line ; Ethnic Groups/genetics ; Female ; *Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation/*genetics ; Genetic Variation ; Genotype ; HapMap Project ; Humans ; Male ; Mass Spectrometry ; *Phenotype ; *Protein Biosynthesis ; Proteome/*analysis/biosynthesis/*genetics ; Proteomics ; Quantitative Trait Loci ; RNA, Messenger/analysis/genetics ; Transcriptome
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-07-06
    Description: Using gravitational microlensing, we detected a cold terrestrial planet orbiting one member of a binary star system. The planet has low mass (twice Earth's) and lies projected at ~0.8 astronomical units (AU) from its host star, about the distance between Earth and the Sun. However, the planet's temperature is much lower, 〈60 Kelvin, because the host star is only 0.10 to 0.15 solar masses and therefore more than 400 times less luminous than the Sun. The host itself orbits a slightly more massive companion with projected separation of 10 to 15 AU. This detection is consistent with such systems being very common. Straightforward modification of current microlensing search strategies could increase sensitivity to planets in binary systems. With more detections, such binary-star planetary systems could constrain models of planet formation and evolution.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Gould, A -- Udalski, A -- Shin, I-G -- Porritt, I -- Skowron, J -- Han, C -- Yee, J C -- Kozlowski, S -- Choi, J-Y -- Poleski, R -- Wyrzykowski, L -- Ulaczyk, K -- Pietrukowicz, P -- Mroz, P -- Szymanski, M K -- Kubiak, M -- Soszynski, I -- Pietrzynski, G -- Gaudi, B S -- Christie, G W -- Drummond, J -- McCormick, J -- Natusch, T -- Ngan, H -- Tan, T-G -- Albrow, M -- DePoy, D L -- Hwang, K-H -- Jung, Y K -- Lee, C-U -- Park, H -- Pogge, R W -- Abe, F -- Bennett, D P -- Bond, I A -- Botzler, C S -- Freeman, M -- Fukui, A -- Fukunaga, D -- Itow, Y -- Koshimoto, N -- Larsen, P -- Ling, C H -- Masuda, K -- Matsubara, Y -- Muraki, Y -- Namba, S -- Ohnishi, K -- Philpott, L -- Rattenbury, N J -- Saito, To -- Sullivan, D J -- Sumi, T -- Suzuki, D -- Tristram, P J -- Tsurumi, N -- Wada, K -- Yamai, N -- Yock, P C M -- Yonehara, A -- Shvartzvald, Y -- Maoz, D -- Kaspi, S -- Friedmann, M -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Jul 4;345(6192):46-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1251527.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. ; Warsaw University Observatory, Aleje Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa, Poland. ; Turitea Observatory, Palmerston North, New Zealand. ; Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 371-763, Republic of Korea. cheongho@astroph.chungbuk.ac.kr. ; Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. ; Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Warsaw University Observatory, Aleje Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa, Poland. ; Warsaw University Observatory, Aleje Ujazdowskie 4, 00-478 Warszawa, Poland. Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA, UK. ; Department of Astronomy, Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210, USA. Universidad de Concepcion, Departamento de Astronomia, Casilla 160-C, Concepcion, Chile. ; Auckland Observatory, Auckland, New Zealand. ; Possum Observatory, Patutahi, New Zealand. ; Farm Cove Observatory, Centre for Backyard Astrophysics, Pakuranga, Auckland, New Zealand. ; Possum Observatory, Patutahi, New Zealand. Auckland University of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. ; Perth Exoplanet Survey Telescope, Perth, Australia. ; Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch, New Zealand. ; Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX 77843-4242, USA. ; Department of Physics, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 371-763, Republic of Korea. ; Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, Daejeon 305-348, Republic of Korea. ; Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8601, Japan. ; University of Notre Dame, Department of Physics, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556-5670, USA. ; Institute of Information and Mathematical Sciences, Massey University, Private Bag 102-904, North Shore Mail Centre, Auckland, New Zealand. ; Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92-019, Auckland 1001, New Zealand. ; Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Asakuchi, Okayama 719-0232, Japan. ; Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Osaka 560-0043, Japan. ; Department of Physics, University of Auckland, Private Bag 92-019, Auckland 1001, New Zealand. Institute of Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Madingley Road, Cambridge CB3 0HA, UK. ; Nagano National College of Technology, Nagano 381-8550, Japan. ; Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4, Canada. ; Tokyo Metropolitan College of Aeronautics, Tokyo 116-8523, Japan. ; School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Victoria University, Wellington, New Zealand. ; Mount John University Observatory, Post Office Box 56, Lake Tekapo 8770, New Zealand. ; Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Kyoto Sangyo University, Kyoto 603-8555, Japan. ; School of Physics and Astronomy, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv 69978, Israel.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24994642" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2011-04-29
    Description: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are essential components of the innate immune response against intracellular bacteria and it is thought that professional phagocytes generate ROS primarily via the phagosomal NADPH oxidase machinery. However, recent studies have suggested that mitochondrial ROS (mROS) also contribute to mouse macrophage bactericidal activity, although the mechanisms linking innate immune signalling to mitochondria for mROS generation remain unclear. Here we demonstrate that engagement of a subset of Toll-like receptors (TLR1, TLR2 and TLR4) results in the recruitment of mitochondria to macrophage phagosomes and augments mROS production. This response involves translocation of a TLR signalling adaptor, tumour necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), to mitochondria, where it engages the protein ECSIT (evolutionarily conserved signalling intermediate in Toll pathways), which is implicated in mitochondrial respiratory chain assembly. Interaction with TRAF6 leads to ECSIT ubiquitination and enrichment at the mitochondrial periphery, resulting in increased mitochondrial and cellular ROS generation. ECSIT- and TRAF6-depleted macrophages have decreased levels of TLR-induced ROS and are significantly impaired in their ability to kill intracellular bacteria. Additionally, reducing macrophage mROS levels by expressing catalase in mitochondria results in defective bacterial killing, confirming the role of mROS in bactericidal activity. These results reveal a novel pathway linking innate immune signalling to mitochondria, implicate mROS as an important component of antibacterial responses and further establish mitochondria as hubs for innate immune signalling.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3460538/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3460538/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉West, A Phillip -- Brodsky, Igor E -- Rahner, Christoph -- Woo, Dong Kyun -- Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye -- Tempst, Paul -- Walsh, Matthew C -- Choi, Yongwon -- Shadel, Gerald S -- Ghosh, Sankar -- NS-056206/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI033443/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS056206/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI033443/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R37-AI33443/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Apr 28;472(7344):476-80. doi: 10.1038/nature09973.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Immunobiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21525932" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; Animals ; Catalase/genetics/metabolism ; Cell Line ; Immunity, Innate ; Macrophages/cytology/*immunology/*metabolism ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Transgenic ; Mitochondria/*metabolism ; Phagosomes/metabolism ; Reactive Oxygen Species/*metabolism ; Salmonella/immunology ; *Signal Transduction ; TNF Receptor-Associated Factor 6/metabolism ; Toll-Like Receptors/*immunology/metabolism ; Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/metabolism ; Ubiquitination
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2016-04-21
    Description: Gauss's law dictates that the net electric field inside a conductor in electrostatic equilibrium is zero by effective charge screening; free carriers within a metal eliminate internal dipoles that may arise owing to asymmetric charge distributions. Quantum physics supports this view, demonstrating that delocalized electrons make a static macroscopic polarization, an ill-defined quantity in metals--it is exceedingly unusual to find a polar metal that exhibits long-range ordered dipoles owing to cooperative atomic displacements aligned from dipolar interactions as in insulating phases. Here we describe the quantum mechanical design and experimental realization of room-temperature polar metals in thin-film ANiO3 perovskite nickelates using a strategy based on atomic-scale control of inversion-preserving (centric) displacements. We predict with ab initio calculations that cooperative polar A cation displacements are geometrically stabilized with a non-equilibrium amplitude and tilt pattern of the corner-connected NiO6 octahedral--the structural signatures of perovskites--owing to geometric constraints imposed by the underlying substrate. Heteroepitaxial thin-films grown on LaAlO3 (111) substrates fulfil the design principles. We achieve both a conducting polar monoclinic oxide that is inaccessible in compositionally identical films grown on (001) substrates, and observe a hidden, previously unreported, non-equilibrium structure in thin-film geometries. We expect that the geometric stabilization approach will provide novel avenues for realizing new multifunctional materials with unusual coexisting properties.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kim, T H -- Puggioni, D -- Yuan, Y -- Xie, L -- Zhou, H -- Campbell, N -- Ryan, P J -- Choi, Y -- Kim, J-W -- Patzner, J R -- Ryu, S -- Podkaminer, J P -- Irwin, J -- Ma, Y -- Fennie, C J -- Rzchowski, M S -- Pan, X Q -- Gopalan, V -- Rondinelli, J M -- Eom, C B -- England -- Nature. 2016 May 5;533(7601):68-72. doi: 10.1038/nature17628. Epub 2016 Apr 20.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA. ; Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208, USA. ; Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Materials Research Institute, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA. ; Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, California 92697, USA. ; National Laboratory of Solid State Microstructures and College of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Nanjing University, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210093, China. ; Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA. ; Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA. ; School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27096369" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2011-06-11
    Description: The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) protein kinase is a master growth promoter that nucleates two complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2. Despite the diverse processes controlled by mTOR, few substrates are known. We defined the mTOR-regulated phosphoproteome by quantitative mass spectrometry and characterized the primary sequence motif specificity of mTOR using positional scanning peptide libraries. We found that the phosphorylation response to insulin is largely mTOR dependent and that mTOR exhibits a unique preference for proline, hydrophobic, and aromatic residues at the +1 position. The adaptor protein Grb10 was identified as an mTORC1 substrate that mediates the inhibition of phosphoinositide 3-kinase typical of cells lacking tuberous sclerosis complex 2 (TSC2), a tumor suppressor and negative regulator of mTORC1. Our work clarifies how mTORC1 inhibits growth factor signaling and opens new areas of investigation in mTOR biology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3177140/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3177140/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hsu, Peggy P -- Kang, Seong A -- Rameseder, Jonathan -- Zhang, Yi -- Ottina, Kathleen A -- Lim, Daniel -- Peterson, Timothy R -- Choi, Yongmun -- Gray, Nathanael S -- Yaffe, Michael B -- Marto, Jarrod A -- Sabatini, David M -- AI47389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA112967/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- ES015339/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- GM68762/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA103866-09/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA129105/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA129105-05/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R37 AI047389/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jun 10;332(6035):1317-22. doi: 10.1126/science.1199498.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Whitehead Institute for Biomedical Research, Nine Cambridge Center, Cambridge, MA 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21659604" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Line ; GRB10 Adaptor Protein/*metabolism ; Humans ; Insulin/metabolism ; Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/*metabolism ; Mass Spectrometry ; Mice ; Multiprotein Complexes ; Naphthyridines/pharmacology ; Phosphoproteins/metabolism ; Phosphorylation ; Proteins/*metabolism ; Proteome/metabolism ; *Signal Transduction ; Sirolimus/pharmacology ; TOR Serine-Threonine Kinases/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...