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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-06-12
    Description: Re-entrant charge order in overdoped (Bi,Pb) 2.12 Sr 1.88 CuO 6+δ outside the pseudogap regime Re-entrant charge order in overdoped (Bi,Pb)〈sub〉2.12〈/sub〉Sr〈sub〉1.88〈/sub〉CuO〈sub〉6+δ〈/sub〉 outside the pseudogap regime, Published online: 11 June 2018; doi:10.1038/s41563-018-0108-3 Observation of charge order in the overdoped (Bi,Pb)2Sr2CuO6+δ superconductor using resonant X-ray scattering and angular-resolved photoemission spectroscopy, over a wide temperature range.
    Print ISSN: 1476-1122
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4660
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology , Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Production Engineering, Mining and Metallurgy, Traffic Engineering, Precision Mechanics , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Published by Springer Nature
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-03-01
    Description: The human X and Y chromosomes evolved from an ordinary pair of autosomes during the past 200-300 million years. The human MSY (male-specific region of Y chromosome) retains only three percent of the ancestral autosomes' genes owing to genetic decay. This evolutionary decay was driven by a series of five 'stratification' events. Each event suppressed X-Y crossing over within a chromosome segment or 'stratum', incorporated that segment into the MSY and subjected its genes to the erosive forces that attend the absence of crossing over. The last of these events occurred 30 million years ago, 5 million years before the human and Old World monkey lineages diverged. Although speculation abounds regarding ongoing decay and looming extinction of the human Y chromosome, remarkably little is known about how many MSY genes were lost in the human lineage in the 25 million years that have followed its separation from the Old World monkey lineage. To investigate this question, we sequenced the MSY of the rhesus macaque, an Old World monkey, and compared it to the human MSY. We discovered that during the last 25 million years MSY gene loss in the human lineage was limited to the youngest stratum (stratum 5), which comprises three percent of the human MSY. In the older strata, which collectively comprise the bulk of the human MSY, gene loss evidently ceased more than 25 million years ago. Likewise, the rhesus MSY has not lost any older genes (from strata 1-4) during the past 25 million years, despite its major structural differences to the human MSY. The rhesus MSY is simpler, with few amplified gene families or palindromes that might enable intrachromosomal recombination and repair. We present an empirical reconstruction of human MSY evolution in which each stratum transitioned from rapid, exponential loss of ancestral genes to strict conservation through purifying selection.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3292678/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3292678/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Hughes, Jennifer F -- Skaletsky, Helen -- Brown, Laura G -- Pyntikova, Tatyana -- Graves, Tina -- Fulton, Robert S -- Dugan, Shannon -- Ding, Yan -- Buhay, Christian J -- Kremitzki, Colin -- Wang, Qiaoyan -- Shen, Hua -- Holder, Michael -- Villasana, Donna -- Nazareth, Lynne V -- Cree, Andrew -- Courtney, Laura -- Veizer, Joelle -- Kotkiewicz, Holland -- Cho, Ting-Jan -- Koutseva, Natalia -- Rozen, Steve -- Muzny, Donna M -- Warren, Wesley C -- Gibbs, Richard A -- Wilson, Richard K -- Page, David C -- R01 HG000257/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG000257-17/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003273/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Feb 22;483(7387):82-6. doi: 10.1038/nature10843.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 9 Cambridge Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. jhughes@wi.mit.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22367542" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Chromosomes, Human, Y/*genetics ; Conserved Sequence/*genetics ; Crossing Over, Genetic/genetics ; *Evolution, Molecular ; Gene Amplification/genetics ; *Gene Deletion ; Humans ; In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence ; Macaca mulatta/*genetics ; Male ; Models, Genetic ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Pan troglodytes/genetics ; Radiation Hybrid Mapping ; Selection, Genetic/genetics ; Time Factors ; Y Chromosome/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-11-28
    Description: Greater understanding of the mechanisms contributing to chemical and enzymatic solubilization of plant cell walls is critical for enabling cost-effective industrial conversion of cellulosic biomass to biofuels. Here, we report the use of correlative imaging in real time to assess the impact of pretreatment, as well as the resulting nanometer-scale changes in cell wall structure, upon subsequent digestion by two commercially relevant cellulase systems. We demonstrate that the small, noncomplexed fungal cellulases deconstruct cell walls using mechanisms that differ considerably from those of the larger, multienzyme complexes (cellulosomes). Furthermore, high-resolution measurement of the microfibrillar architecture of cell walls suggests that digestion is primarily facilitated by enabling enzyme access to the hydrophobic cellulose face. The data support the conclusion that ideal pretreatments should maximize lignin removal and minimize polysaccharide modification, thereby retaining the essentially native microfibrillar structure.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ding, Shi-You -- Liu, Yu-San -- Zeng, Yining -- Himmel, Michael E -- Baker, John O -- Bayer, Edward A -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Nov 23;338(6110):1055-60. doi: 10.1126/science.1227491.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Biosciences Center, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO 80401, USA. shi.you.ding@nrel.gov〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23180856" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Cell Wall/*chemistry ; Cellulases/*chemistry ; Cellulose/chemistry ; Clostridium thermocellum/*enzymology ; Lignin/chemistry ; Microscopy, Confocal/methods ; Molecular Imaging ; Nanoparticles/*chemistry ; Plant Cells/*chemistry ; Polysaccharides/chemistry ; Spectrum Analysis, Raman/methods ; Trichoderma/*enzymology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-11-26
    Description: RNA structure has critical roles in processes ranging from ligand sensing to the regulation of translation, polyadenylation and splicing. However, a lack of genome-wide in vivo RNA structural data has limited our understanding of how RNA structure regulates gene expression in living cells. Here we present a high-throughput, genome-wide in vivo RNA structure probing method, structure-seq, in which dimethyl sulphate methylation of unprotected adenines and cytosines is identified by next-generation sequencing. Application of this method to Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings yielded the first in vivo genome-wide RNA structure map at nucleotide resolution for any organism, with quantitative structural information across more than 10,000 transcripts. Our analysis reveals a three-nucleotide periodic repeat pattern in the structure of coding regions, as well as a less-structured region immediately upstream of the start codon, and shows that these features are strongly correlated with translation efficiency. We also find patterns of strong and weak secondary structure at sites of alternative polyadenylation, as well as strong secondary structure at 5' splice sites that correlates with unspliced events. Notably, in vivo structures of messenger RNAs annotated for stress responses are poorly predicted in silico, whereas mRNA structures of genes related to cell function maintenance are well predicted. Global comparison of several structural features between these two categories shows that the mRNAs associated with stress responses tend to have more single-strandedness, longer maximal loop length and higher free energy per nucleotide, features that may allow these RNAs to undergo conformational changes in response to environmental conditions. Structure-seq allows the RNA structurome and its biological roles to be interrogated on a genome-wide scale and should be applicable to any organism.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ding, Yiliang -- Tang, Yin -- Kwok, Chun Kit -- Zhang, Yu -- Bevilacqua, Philip C -- Assmann, Sarah M -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jan 30;505(7485):696-700. doi: 10.1038/nature12756. Epub 2013 Nov 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Biology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA [2] Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA [3] Center for RNA Molecular Biology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA [4]. ; 1] Department of Biology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA [2] Center for RNA Molecular Biology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA [3] Bioinformatics and Genomics Graduate Program, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA [4]. ; 1] Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA [2] Center for RNA Molecular Biology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA [3]. ; 1] Bioinformatics and Genomics Graduate Program, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA [2] Department of Statistics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA. ; 1] Department of Chemistry, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA [2] Center for RNA Molecular Biology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA [3] Plant Biology Graduate Program, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA. ; 1] Department of Biology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA [2] Center for RNA Molecular Biology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA [3] Bioinformatics and Genomics Graduate Program, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA [4] Plant Biology Graduate Program, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24270811" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Arabidopsis/*genetics ; Base Sequence ; Codon, Initiator/genetics ; Computational Biology ; Genome, Plant/*genetics ; Molecular Sequence Data ; *Nucleic Acid Conformation ; Phylogeny ; Polyadenylation/genetics ; Protein Biosynthesis/genetics ; RNA Splice Sites/genetics ; RNA, Messenger/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; RNA, Plant/analysis/*chemistry/genetics/*metabolism ; RNA, Ribosomal, 18S/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; *Regulatory Sequences, Ribonucleic Acid/genetics ; Sequence Analysis, RNA ; Stress, Physiological/genetics ; Structure-Activity Relationship
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2014-04-25
    Description: The human X and Y chromosomes evolved from an ordinary pair of autosomes, but millions of years ago genetic decay ravaged the Y chromosome, and only three per cent of its ancestral genes survived. We reconstructed the evolution of the Y chromosome across eight mammals to identify biases in gene content and the selective pressures that preserved the surviving ancestral genes. Our findings indicate that survival was nonrandom, and in two cases, convergent across placental and marsupial mammals. We conclude that the gene content of the Y chromosome became specialized through selection to maintain the ancestral dosage of homologous X-Y gene pairs that function as broadly expressed regulators of transcription, translation and protein stability. We propose that beyond its roles in testis determination and spermatogenesis, the Y chromosome is essential for male viability, and has unappreciated roles in Turner's syndrome and in phenotypic differences between the sexes in health and disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4139287/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4139287/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Bellott, Daniel W -- Hughes, Jennifer F -- Skaletsky, Helen -- Brown, Laura G -- Pyntikova, Tatyana -- Cho, Ting-Jan -- Koutseva, Natalia -- Zaghlul, Sara -- Graves, Tina -- Rock, Susie -- Kremitzki, Colin -- Fulton, Robert S -- Dugan, Shannon -- Ding, Yan -- Morton, Donna -- Khan, Ziad -- Lewis, Lora -- Buhay, Christian -- Wang, Qiaoyan -- Watt, Jennifer -- Holder, Michael -- Lee, Sandy -- Nazareth, Lynne -- Alfoldi, Jessica -- Rozen, Steve -- Muzny, Donna M -- Warren, Wesley C -- Gibbs, Richard A -- Wilson, Richard K -- Page, David C -- P51 RR013986/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003079/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003273/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Apr 24;508(7497):494-9. doi: 10.1038/nature13206.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Whitehead Institute, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, & Department of Biology, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA. ; The Genome Institute, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri 63108, USA. ; Human Genome Sequencing Center, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24759411" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Chromosomes, Human, X/genetics ; Chromosomes, Human, Y/genetics ; Disease ; *Evolution, Molecular ; Female ; Gene Dosage/*genetics ; Gene Expression Regulation ; Health ; Humans ; Male ; Mammals/*genetics ; Marsupialia/genetics ; Molecular Sequence Annotation ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Protein Biosynthesis/genetics ; Protein Stability ; Selection, Genetic/genetics ; Sequence Homology ; Sex Characteristics ; Spermatogenesis/genetics ; Testis/metabolism ; Transcription, Genetic/genetics ; Turner Syndrome/genetics ; X Chromosome/genetics ; Y Chromosome/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2015-11-19
    Description: Acorn worms, also known as enteropneust (literally, 'gut-breathing') hemichordates, are marine invertebrates that share features with echinoderms and chordates. Together, these three phyla comprise the deuterostomes. Here we report the draft genome sequences of two acorn worms, Saccoglossus kowalevskii and Ptychodera flava. By comparing them with diverse bilaterian genomes, we identify shared traits that were probably inherited from the last common deuterostome ancestor, and then explore evolutionary trajectories leading from this ancestor to hemichordates, echinoderms and chordates. The hemichordate genomes exhibit extensive conserved synteny with amphioxus and other bilaterians, and deeply conserved non-coding sequences that are candidates for conserved gene-regulatory elements. Notably, hemichordates possess a deuterostome-specific genomic cluster of four ordered transcription factor genes, the expression of which is associated with the development of pharyngeal 'gill' slits, the foremost morphological innovation of early deuterostomes, and is probably central to their filter-feeding lifestyle. Comparative analysis reveals numerous deuterostome-specific gene novelties, including genes found in deuterostomes and marine microbes, but not other animals. The putative functions of these genes can be linked to physiological, metabolic and developmental specializations of the filter-feeding ancestor.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4729200/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4729200/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Simakov, Oleg -- Kawashima, Takeshi -- Marletaz, Ferdinand -- Jenkins, Jerry -- Koyanagi, Ryo -- Mitros, Therese -- Hisata, Kanako -- Bredeson, Jessen -- Shoguchi, Eiichi -- Gyoja, Fuki -- Yue, Jia-Xing -- Chen, Yi-Chih -- Freeman, Robert M Jr -- Sasaki, Akane -- Hikosaka-Katayama, Tomoe -- Sato, Atsuko -- Fujie, Manabu -- Baughman, Kenneth W -- Levine, Judith -- Gonzalez, Paul -- Cameron, Christopher -- Fritzenwanker, Jens H -- Pani, Ariel M -- Goto, Hiroki -- Kanda, Miyuki -- Arakaki, Nana -- Yamasaki, Shinichi -- Qu, Jiaxin -- Cree, Andrew -- Ding, Yan -- Dinh, Huyen H -- Dugan, Shannon -- Holder, Michael -- Jhangiani, Shalini N -- Kovar, Christie L -- Lee, Sandra L -- Lewis, Lora R -- Morton, Donna -- Nazareth, Lynne V -- Okwuonu, Geoffrey -- Santibanez, Jireh -- Chen, Rui -- Richards, Stephen -- Muzny, Donna M -- Gillis, Andrew -- Peshkin, Leonid -- Wu, Michael -- Humphreys, Tom -- Su, Yi-Hsien -- Putnam, Nicholas H -- Schmutz, Jeremy -- Fujiyama, Asao -- Yu, Jr-Kai -- Tagawa, Kunifumi -- Worley, Kim C -- Gibbs, Richard A -- Kirschner, Marc W -- Lowe, Christopher J -- Satoh, Noriyuki -- Rokhsar, Daniel S -- Gerhart, John -- HD37277/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- HD42724/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD037277/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD073104/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01HD073104/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- T32 HD055164/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003273/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Nov 26;527(7579):459-65. doi: 10.1038/nature16150. Epub 2015 Nov 18.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Molecular Genetics Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Onna, Okinawa 904-0495, Japan. ; Department of Molecular Evolution, Centre for Organismal Studies, University of Heidelberg, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany. ; Marine Genomics Unit, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Onna, Okinawa 904-0495, Japan. ; Department of Zoology, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PS, UK. ; HudsonAlpha Institute of Biotechnology, Huntsville, Alabama 35806, USA. ; DNA Sequencing Section, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University, Onna, Okinawa 904-0495, Japan. ; Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley California 94720-3200, USA. ; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005, USA. ; Institute of Cellular and Organismic Biology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan. ; Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Marine Biological Laboratory, Graduate School of Science, Hiroshima University, Onomichi, Hiroshima 722-0073, Japan. ; Natural Science Center for Basic Research and Development, Gene Science Division, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8527, Japan. ; Marine Biological Association of the UK, The Laboratory, Citadel Hill, Plymouth PL1 2PB, UK. ; Department of Biology, Hopkins Marine Station, Stanford University, Pacific Grove, California 93950, USA. ; Department de sciences biologiques, University of Montreal, Quebec H3C 3J7, Canada. ; University of North Caroline at Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA. ; Human Genome Sequencing Center, Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, MS BCM226, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Zoology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3EJ, UK. ; Institute for Biogenesis Research, University of Hawaii, Hawaii 96822, USA. ; National Institute of Genetics, Mishima, Shizuoka 411-8540, Japan. ; US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute, Walnut Creek, California 94598, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26580012" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Chordata, Nonvertebrate/classification/*genetics ; Conserved Sequence/genetics ; Echinodermata/classification/genetics ; *Evolution, Molecular ; Genome/*genetics ; Multigene Family/genetics ; Phylogeny ; Signal Transduction ; Synteny/genetics ; Transforming Growth Factor beta
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-08-16
    Description: The potential disrupting effects of Azo dye on wastewater nutrients removal deserved more analysis. In this study, 15 days exposure experiments were conducted with alizarin yellow R (AYR) as a model dye to determine whether the dye caused adverse effects on biological removal of both the dye and nutrients in acclimated anaerobic–aerobic–anoxic sequencing batch reactors. The results showed that the AYR removal efficiency was, respectively, 85.7% and 66.8% at AYR concentrations of 50 and 200 mg l –1 , while higher AYR inlet (400 mg l –1 ) might inactivate sludge. Lower removal of AYR at 200 mg l –1 of AYR was due to the insufficient support of electron donors in the anaerobic process. However, the decolorized by-products p -phenylenediamine and 5-aminosalicylic were completely decomposed in the following aerobic stage at both 50 and 200 mg l –1 of AYR concentrations. Compared with the absence of AYR, the presence of 200 mg l –1 of AYR decreased the total nitrogen removal efficiency from 82.4 to 41.1%, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency initially decreased to 68.1% and then returned to around 83.4% in the long-term exposure time. It was also found that the inhibition of AYR, nitrogen and COD removal induced by a higher concentration of AYR was due to the increased intracellular reactive oxygen species production, which caused the rise of oxidation–reduction potential value and decreased ammonia monooxygenase and nitrite oxidoreductase activities.
    Keywords: environmental science
    Electronic ISSN: 2054-5703
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Published by Royal Society
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2013-05-31
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉McCandlish, David M -- Rajon, Etienne -- Shah, Premal -- Ding, Yang -- Plotkin, Joshua B -- England -- Nature. 2013 May 30;497(7451):E1-2; discussion E2-3. doi: 10.1038/nature12219.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23719465" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Epistasis, Genetic/*genetics ; *Evolution, Molecular
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2014-11-20
    Description: Intestinal microbial communities have profound effects on host physiology. Whereas the symbiotic contribution of commensal bacteria is well established, the role of eukaryotic viruses that are present in the gastrointestinal tract under homeostatic conditions is undefined. Here we demonstrate that a common enteric RNA virus can replace the beneficial function of commensal bacteria in the intestine. Murine norovirus (MNV) infection of germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice restored intestinal morphology and lymphocyte function without inducing overt inflammation and disease. The presence of MNV also suppressed an expansion of group 2 innate lymphoid cells observed in the absence of bacteria, and induced transcriptional changes in the intestine associated with immune development and type I interferon (IFN) signalling. Consistent with this observation, the IFN-alpha receptor was essential for the ability of MNV to compensate for bacterial depletion. Importantly, MNV infection offset the deleterious effect of treatment with antibiotics in models of intestinal injury and pathogenic bacterial infection. These data indicate that eukaryotic viruses have the capacity to support intestinal homeostasis and shape mucosal immunity, similarly to commensal bacteria.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4257755/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4257755/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kernbauer, Elisabeth -- Ding, Yi -- Cadwell, Ken -- J 3435/Austrian Science Fund FWF/Austria -- P30CA016087/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK093668/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Dec 4;516(7529):94-8. doi: 10.1038/nature13960. Epub 2014 Nov 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Kimmel Center for Biology and Medicine at the Skirball Institute, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016, USA [2] Department of Microbiology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016, USA. ; 1] New York Presbyterian Hospital, New York, New York 10065, USA [2] Department of Pathology, New York University School of Medicine, New York, New York 10016, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25409145" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology ; Bacterial Physiological Phenomena/*immunology ; Citrobacter rodentium/physiology ; Enterobacteriaceae Infections/immunology ; Enterovirus/immunology/*physiology ; Female ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation/immunology ; Immunity, Innate/immunology ; Immunity, Mucosal/*immunology ; Interferon Type I/immunology ; Intestinal Mucosa/cytology/drug effects/*immunology/*virology ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Norovirus/immunology/physiology ; Signal Transduction/immunology ; Specific Pathogen-Free Organisms
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2018-05-31
    Description: Zeolitic-imidazole frameworks (ZIFs), as novel porous materials, are attracting much attention in several fields due to their special advantages such as large specific surface area, versatile porosity and well-connected networks. Here, we develop a porous ZIF-derived catalytic thin film, which was coated on the conducting glass as a counter electrode (CE) to substitute costly platinum for quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs). A ZIF layer is first prepared by coating ZIF-67 powders on the conducting glass, followed by the careful calcination treatments in sulfur vapour (sulfuration) or nitrogen gas (carbonization). The structure and morphologies of the derived porous film are characterized by the measurements of XRD, SEM and BET, and the electrochemical properties in the polysulfide solution are evaluated by the measurements of Tafel curves and electrochemical impedance spectroscopies. The derived porous film is used as a CE to fabricate QDSSC with CdSe quantum dot-sensitized TiO 2 nanocrystalline thin film and the polysulfide solution. Compared with the photovoltaic performance of CdSe QDSSCs based on the CE prepared by the different sulfuration conditions, QDSSC based on the CE derived by the sulfuration for 30 min shows an excellent light-to-electric conversion efficiency of 3.77%, it is even higher than that of QDSSC based on Pt CE (2.98%). This work will open a new avenue to design a facile, low-cost and renewable CE for QDSSC.
    Keywords: physical chemistry
    Electronic ISSN: 2054-5703
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Published by Royal Society
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