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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-06-05
    Description: Objective The goal of this study is to investigate the associations of apolipoprotein A5 ( APOA5 ) polymorphisms with coronary artery disease (CAD) in a Chinese population. Method This case–control study included 710 subjects (355 patients with CAD and 355 controls) who were recruited from a cross-sectional study. Three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) rs662799 (–1131T〉C), rs651821 (–3A〉G) and rs2075291 (G185C) in APOA5 were selected and genotyped using the matrix-assisted laser desorption ioniasation time of flight mass spectrometry technology. The 2 test and haplotype analysis were performed to analyse the associations between APOA5 SNPs and CAD using the SPSS V.22.0 software package and the online SNPStats program. Results APOA5 SNPs rs662799 and rs651821 exhibited significant differences in genotype and allele distributions between patients with CAD and control subjects. The SNP rs662799 was significantly correlated with an increased risk of CAD when a dominant model was considered. The SNP rs651821 was significantly correlated with an increased risk of CAD when a codominant model was considered. Moreover, the variant C alleles of rs662799 and the variant G alleles of the rs651821 polymorphism were significantly correlated with increased plasma triglyceride (TG) levels in the CAD group (all p〈0.05). Additionally, a mediating effect of TG on the associations between the APOA5 rs662799 and rs651821 polymorphisms and CAD was observed. Conclusion Based on these data, variants of the APOA5 gene are associated with CAD susceptibility and may modulate plasma TG levels among a Chinese population.
    Keywords: Open access, Genetics and genomics
    Electronic ISSN: 2044-6055
    Topics: Medicine
    Published by BMJ Publishing
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-04-13
    Description: Autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are believed to have genetic and environmental origins, yet in only a modest fraction of individuals can specific causes be identified. To identify further genetic risk factors, here we assess the role of de novo mutations in ASD by sequencing the exomes of ASD cases and their parents (n = 175 trios). Fewer than half of the cases (46.3%) carry a missense or nonsense de novo variant, and the overall rate of mutation is only modestly higher than the expected rate. In contrast, the proteins encoded by genes that harboured de novo missense or nonsense mutations showed a higher degree of connectivity among themselves and to previous ASD genes as indexed by protein-protein interaction screens. The small increase in the rate of de novo events, when taken together with the protein interaction results, are consistent with an important but limited role for de novo point mutations in ASD, similar to that documented for de novo copy number variants. Genetic models incorporating these data indicate that most of the observed de novo events are unconnected to ASD; those that do confer risk are distributed across many genes and are incompletely penetrant (that is, not necessarily sufficient for disease). Our results support polygenic models in which spontaneous coding mutations in any of a large number of genes increases risk by 5- to 20-fold. Despite the challenge posed by such models, results from de novo events and a large parallel case-control study provide strong evidence in favour of CHD8 and KATNAL2 as genuine autism risk factors.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3613847/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3613847/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Neale, Benjamin M -- Kou, Yan -- Liu, Li -- Ma'ayan, Avi -- Samocha, Kaitlin E -- Sabo, Aniko -- Lin, Chiao-Feng -- Stevens, Christine -- Wang, Li-San -- Makarov, Vladimir -- Polak, Paz -- Yoon, Seungtai -- Maguire, Jared -- Crawford, Emily L -- Campbell, Nicholas G -- Geller, Evan T -- Valladares, Otto -- Schafer, Chad -- Liu, Han -- Zhao, Tuo -- Cai, Guiqing -- Lihm, Jayon -- Dannenfelser, Ruth -- Jabado, Omar -- Peralta, Zuleyma -- Nagaswamy, Uma -- Muzny, Donna -- Reid, Jeffrey G -- Newsham, Irene -- Wu, Yuanqing -- Lewis, Lora -- Han, Yi -- Voight, Benjamin F -- Lim, Elaine -- Rossin, Elizabeth -- Kirby, Andrew -- Flannick, Jason -- Fromer, Menachem -- Shakir, Khalid -- Fennell, Tim -- Garimella, Kiran -- Banks, Eric -- Poplin, Ryan -- Gabriel, Stacey -- DePristo, Mark -- Wimbish, Jack R -- Boone, Braden E -- Levy, Shawn E -- Betancur, Catalina -- Sunyaev, Shamil -- Boerwinkle, Eric -- Buxbaum, Joseph D -- Cook, Edwin H Jr -- Devlin, Bernie -- Gibbs, Richard A -- Roeder, Kathryn -- Schellenberg, Gerard D -- Sutcliffe, James S -- Daly, Mark J -- KL2 RR024977/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- P30 HD015052/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM071558/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 HD055751/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH057881/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH061009/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH089004/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH089025/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH089175/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH089208/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH089482/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01MH084676/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01MH089175/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01MH089208/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007753/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- TL1 RR024978/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003067/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003273/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- UL1 RR024975/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Apr 4;485(7397):242-5. doi: 10.1038/nature11011.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Analytic and Translational Genetics Unit, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02114, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22495311" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Autistic Disorder/*genetics ; Case-Control Studies ; DNA-Binding Proteins/*genetics ; Exome/genetics ; Exons/*genetics ; Family Health ; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/*genetics ; Humans ; Models, Genetic ; Multifactorial Inheritance/genetics ; Mutation/*genetics ; Phenotype ; Poisson Distribution ; Protein Interaction Maps ; Transcription Factors/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-11-05
    Description: The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorder involves the interplay of common and rare variants and their impact on hundreds of genes. Using exome sequencing, here we show that analysis of rare coding variation in 3,871 autism cases and 9,937 ancestry-matched or parental controls implicates 22 autosomal genes at a false discovery rate (FDR) 〈 0.05, plus a set of 107 autosomal genes strongly enriched for those likely to affect risk (FDR 〈 0.30). These 107 genes, which show unusual evolutionary constraint against mutations, incur de novo loss-of-function mutations in over 5% of autistic subjects. Many of the genes implicated encode proteins for synaptic formation, transcriptional regulation and chromatin-remodelling pathways. These include voltage-gated ion channels regulating the propagation of action potentials, pacemaking and excitability-transcription coupling, as well as histone-modifying enzymes and chromatin remodellers-most prominently those that mediate post-translational lysine methylation/demethylation modifications of histones.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4402723/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4402723/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉De Rubeis, Silvia -- He, Xin -- Goldberg, Arthur P -- Poultney, Christopher S -- Samocha, Kaitlin -- Cicek, A Erucment -- Kou, Yan -- Liu, Li -- Fromer, Menachem -- Walker, Susan -- Singh, Tarinder -- Klei, Lambertus -- Kosmicki, Jack -- Shih-Chen, Fu -- Aleksic, Branko -- Biscaldi, Monica -- Bolton, Patrick F -- Brownfeld, Jessica M -- Cai, Jinlu -- Campbell, Nicholas G -- Carracedo, Angel -- Chahrour, Maria H -- Chiocchetti, Andreas G -- Coon, Hilary -- Crawford, Emily L -- Curran, Sarah R -- Dawson, Geraldine -- Duketis, Eftichia -- Fernandez, Bridget A -- Gallagher, Louise -- Geller, Evan -- Guter, Stephen J -- Hill, R Sean -- Ionita-Laza, Juliana -- Jimenz Gonzalez, Patricia -- Kilpinen, Helena -- Klauck, Sabine M -- Kolevzon, Alexander -- Lee, Irene -- Lei, Irene -- Lei, Jing -- Lehtimaki, Terho -- Lin, Chiao-Feng -- Ma'ayan, Avi -- Marshall, Christian R -- McInnes, Alison L -- Neale, Benjamin -- Owen, Michael J -- Ozaki, Noriio -- Parellada, Mara -- Parr, Jeremy R -- Purcell, Shaun -- Puura, Kaija -- Rajagopalan, Deepthi -- Rehnstrom, Karola -- Reichenberg, Abraham -- Sabo, Aniko -- Sachse, Michael -- Sanders, Stephan J -- Schafer, Chad -- Schulte-Ruther, Martin -- Skuse, David -- Stevens, Christine -- Szatmari, Peter -- Tammimies, Kristiina -- Valladares, Otto -- Voran, Annette -- Li-San, Wang -- Weiss, Lauren A -- Willsey, A Jeremy -- Yu, Timothy W -- Yuen, Ryan K C -- DDD Study -- Homozygosity Mapping Collaborative for Autism -- UK10K Consortium -- Cook, Edwin H -- Freitag, Christine M -- Gill, Michael -- Hultman, Christina M -- Lehner, Thomas -- Palotie, Aaarno -- Schellenberg, Gerard D -- Sklar, Pamela -- State, Matthew W -- Sutcliffe, James S -- Walsh, Christiopher A -- Scherer, Stephen W -- Zwick, Michael E -- Barett, Jeffrey C -- Cutler, David J -- Roeder, Kathryn -- Devlin, Bernie -- Daly, Mark J -- Buxbaum, Joseph D -- 5UL1 RR024975/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- MH077139/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- MH089482/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- MH095034/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- P30 HD15052/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- P50 HD055751/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH061009/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH083565/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH089482/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH094400/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH095797/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH097849/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH100229/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS073601/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01MH083565/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01MH089208/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R37 MH057881/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- RC2MH089952/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- T32 HG002295/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- U01 MH100209/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U01 MH100229/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U01 MH100233/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U01 MH100239/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U01MH100209/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U01MH100229/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U01MH100233/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U01MH100239/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U54 HG003067/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- UL1TR000445/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- WT091310/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- WT098051/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Nov 13;515(7526):209-15. doi: 10.1038/nature13772. Epub 2014 Oct 29.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25363760" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Child Development Disorders, Pervasive/*genetics/pathology ; Chromatin/*genetics/metabolism ; Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly ; Exome/genetics ; Female ; Genetic Predisposition to Disease/*genetics ; Germ-Line Mutation/genetics ; Humans ; Male ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutation/*genetics ; Mutation, Missense/genetics ; Nerve Net/metabolism ; Odds Ratio ; Synapses/*metabolism ; Transcription, Genetic/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-04-27
    Description: Newborns with congenital cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection are at high risk for developing permanent sequelae. Intravenous ganciclovir therapy is frequently used for the treatment of congenital CMV infection. A target area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC 0–24 ) of 40 to 50 μg · h/ml is recommended. The standard dose has resulted in a large variability in ganciclovir exposure in newborns, indicating the unmet need of dosage individualization for this vulnerable population, but the implementation of this strategy remains challenging in clinical practice. We aim to evaluate the clinical utility of model-based dosage individualization of ganciclovir in newborns using an opportunistic sampling approach. The predictive performance of a published ganciclovir population pharmacokinetic model was evaluated using an independent patient cohort. The individual dose was adjusted based on the target AUC 0–24 to ensure its efficacy. A total of 26 newborns with congenital CMV infection were included in the present study. Only 11 (42.3%) patients achieved the target AUC 0–24 after being given the standard dose. For all the subtherapeutic patients (achieving 〈80% of the target AUC) ( n = 5), a model-based dosage adjustment was performed using the Bayesian estimation method combined with the opportunistic sampling strategy. The adjusted doses were increased by 28.6% to 60.0% in these five patients, and all adapted AUC 0–24 values achieved the target (range, 48.6 to 66.1 μg · h/ml). The clinical utility of model-based dosing individualization of ganciclovir was demonstrated in newborns with congenital CMV infection. The population pharmacokinetic model combined with the opportunistic sampling strategy provides a clinically feasible method to adapt the ganciclovir dose in neonatal clinical practice. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT03113344.)
    Print ISSN: 0066-4804
    Electronic ISSN: 1098-6596
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2015-12-05
    Description: Whereas the cellular basis of the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niche in the bone marrow has been characterized, the nature of the fetal liver niche is not yet elucidated. We show that Nestin(+)NG2(+) pericytes associate with portal vessels, forming a niche promoting HSC expansion. Nestin(+)NG2(+) cells and HSCs scale during development with the fractal branching patterns of portal vessels, tributaries of the umbilical vein. After closure of the umbilical inlet at birth, portal vessels undergo a transition from Neuropilin-1(+)Ephrin-B2(+) artery to EphB4(+) vein phenotype, associated with a loss of periportal Nestin(+)NG2(+) cells and emigration of HSCs away from portal vessels. These data support a model in which HSCs are titrated against a periportal vascular niche with a fractal-like organization enabled by placental circulation.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4706788/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4706788/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Khan, Jalal A -- Mendelson, Avital -- Kunisaki, Yuya -- Birbrair, Alexander -- Kou, Yan -- Arnal-Estape, Anna -- Pinho, Sandra -- Ciero, Paul -- Nakahara, Fumio -- Ma'ayan, Avi -- Bergman, Aviv -- Merad, Miriam -- Frenette, Paul S -- CA164468/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- DA033788/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- DK056638/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- F30 943257/PHS HHS/ -- F32 HL123224/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- HL069438/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- HL097700/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA173861/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA190400/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA033788/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK056638/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL069438/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL116340/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01GM098316/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32 063754/PHS HHS/ -- U54 HL127624/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- U54CA189201/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U54HL127624/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 Jan 8;351(6269):176-80. doi: 10.1126/science.aad0084. Epub 2015 Dec 3.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Research. Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. Department of Cell Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. Department of Oncological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. ; Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Research. Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. Department of Cell Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. ; Department of Pharmacology and Systems Therapeutics, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. ; Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Research. Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. ; Department of Systems and Computational Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. ; Department of Oncological Sciences, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY, USA. ; Ruth L. and David S. Gottesman Institute for Stem Cell and Regenerative Medicine Research. Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. Department of Cell Biology, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. Department of Medicine, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY, USA. paul.frenette@einstein.yu.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26634440" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antigens/analysis ; Ephrin-B2/analysis ; Female ; Hematopoietic Stem Cells/*physiology ; Liver/blood supply/*embryology ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Mutant Strains ; Nestin/analysis ; Neuropilin-1/analysis ; Placental Circulation ; Portal System/chemistry/*embryology ; Pregnancy ; Proteoglycans/analysis ; Receptor, EphB4/analysis ; Stem Cell Niche/*physiology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; NETWORK ; RISK ; DISCOVERY ; SCHIZOPHRENIA ; FRAMEWORK ; COPY-NUMBER VARIATION ; SPECTRUM DISORDERS ; DE-NOVO MUTATIONS ; NEURODEVELOPMENTAL DISORDERS
    Abstract: The genetic architecture of autism spectrum disorder involves the interplay of common and rare variants and their impact on hundreds of genes. Using exome sequencing, here we show that analysis of rare coding variation in 3,871 autism cases and 9,937 ancestry-matched or parental controls implicates 22 autosomal genes at a false discovery rate (FDR) 〈 0.05, plus a set of 107 autosomal genes strongly enriched for those likely to affect risk (FDR 〈 0.30). These 107 genes, which show unusual evolutionary constraint against mutations, incur de novo loss-of-function mutations in over 5% of autistic subjects. Many of the genes implicated encode proteins for synaptic formation, transcriptional regulation and chromatin-remodelling pathways. These include voltage-gated ion channels regulating the propagation of action potentials, pacemaking and excitability-transcription coupling, as well as histone-modifying enzymes and chromatin remodellers-most prominently those that mediate post-translational lysine methylation/demethylation modifications of histones.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25363760
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1750-3841
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Mold conidia germination was used as a microbial probe of food stability in sucrose, starch, and sucrose/starch systems. A group of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) techniques were used to fully characterize the water and solid mobility and glass transition temperature (Tg) of the systems, respectively. Water content, aw, and 2H NMR R1 and R2 relaxation rates did not predict mold germination time. We concluded that the self-diffusion coefficient, (translational mobility of water), the DSC Tg (overall system mobility), and to a more limited extent, the 2H NMR R*2 relaxation rate and the 13C T1p (solids mobility), could provide alternative measures to supplement aw for predicting food stability and safety.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    Respiration Physiology 95 (1994), S. 67-79 
    ISSN: 0034-5687
    Keywords: Adrenoceptors, carotid body, hypoxia ; Carotid body, sympathetic innervation ; Hypoxia ; Mammals, cat
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Medicine
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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