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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-11-01
    Description: Oxide is widely used in modifying cathode and anode materials for lithium-ion batteries. In this work, a facile method of radio magnetron sputtering is introduced to deposit a thin film on Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 composite electrodes. The pristine and modified Li 4 Ti 5 O 12 electrodes are characterized at an extended voltage range of 3–0.01 V. The reversible capacity reaches a high level of 286 mAh g –1 , which is a little less than its theoretical capacity (293 mAh g –1 ). Electrodes modified by ZnO thin films with various thickness show elevated rate capability and improved cycle performance.
    Keywords: materials science, power and energy systems
    Electronic ISSN: 2054-5703
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Published by Royal Society
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2013-12-18
    Description: Strigolactones (SLs), a newly discovered class of carotenoid-derived phytohormones, are essential for developmental processes that shape plant architecture and interactions with parasitic weeds and symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Despite the rapid progress in elucidating the SL biosynthetic pathway, the perception and signalling mechanisms of SL remain poorly understood. Here we show that DWARF 53 (D53) acts as a repressor of SL signalling and that SLs induce its degradation. We find that the rice (Oryza sativa) d53 mutant, which produces an exaggerated number of tillers compared to wild-type plants, is caused by a gain-of-function mutation and is insensitive to exogenous SL treatment. The D53 gene product shares predicted features with the class I Clp ATPase proteins and can form a complex with the alpha/beta hydrolase protein DWARF 14 (D14) and the F-box protein DWARF 3 (D3), two previously identified signalling components potentially responsible for SL perception. We demonstrate that, in a D14- and D3-dependent manner, SLs induce D53 degradation by the proteasome and abrogate its activity in promoting axillary bud outgrowth. Our combined genetic and biochemical data reveal that D53 acts as a repressor of the SL signalling pathway, whose hormone-induced degradation represents a key molecular link between SL perception and responses.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4096652/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4096652/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhou, Feng -- Lin, Qibing -- Zhu, Lihong -- Ren, Yulong -- Zhou, Kunneng -- Shabek, Nitzan -- Wu, Fuqing -- Mao, Haibin -- Dong, Wei -- Gan, Lu -- Ma, Weiwei -- Gao, He -- Chen, Jun -- Yang, Chao -- Wang, Dan -- Tan, Junjie -- Zhang, Xin -- Guo, Xiuping -- Wang, Jiulin -- Jiang, Ling -- Liu, Xi -- Chen, Weiqi -- Chu, Jinfang -- Yan, Cunyu -- Ueno, Kotomi -- Ito, Shinsaku -- Asami, Tadao -- Cheng, Zhijun -- Wang, Jie -- Lei, Cailin -- Zhai, Huqu -- Wu, Chuanyin -- Wang, Haiyang -- Zheng, Ning -- Wan, Jianmin -- R01 CA107134/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Dec 19;504(7480):406-10. doi: 10.1038/nature12878. Epub 2013 Dec 11.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] National Key Laboratory for Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement, Jiangsu Plant Gene Engineering Research Center, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China [2] National Key Facility for Crop Gene Resources and Genetic Improvement, Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, China. ; National Key Facility for Crop Gene Resources and Genetic Improvement, Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Beijing 100081, China. ; National Key Laboratory for Crop Genetics and Germplasm Enhancement, Jiangsu Plant Gene Engineering Research Center, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China. ; 1] Department of Pharmacology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Box 357280, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; National Centre for Plant Gene Research (Beijing), Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 1-2 Beichen West Road, Beijing 100101, China. ; Department of Applied Biological Chemistry, The University of Tokyo, 1-1-1 Yayoi, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8657, Japan.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24336215" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Cloning, Molecular ; Gene Expression Regulation, Plant ; Lactones/*metabolism ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Mutation/genetics ; Oryza/genetics/*metabolism ; Phenotype ; Plant Growth Regulators/*metabolism ; Plant Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism ; Protein Binding ; *Proteolysis ; SKP Cullin F-Box Protein Ligases/*metabolism ; *Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-09-06
    Description: Publisher Correction: Strongly-coupled quantum critical point in an all-in-all-out antiferromagnet Publisher Correction: Strongly-coupled quantum critical point in an all-in-all-out antiferromagnet, Published online: 05 September 2018; doi:10.1038/s41467-018-05881-3 Publisher Correction: Strongly-coupled quantum critical point in an all-in-all-out antiferromagnet
    Electronic ISSN: 2041-1723
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-02-23
    Description: Respiratory diseases, which are leading causes of mortality and morbidity in the world, are dysfunctions of the nasopharynx, the trachea, the bronchus, the lung and the pleural cavity. Symptoms of chronic respiratory diseases, such as cough, sneezing and difficulty breathing, may seriously affect the productivity, sleep quality and physical and mental well-being of patients, and patients with acute respiratory diseases may have difficulty breathing, anoxia and even life-threatening respiratory failure. Respiratory diseases are generally heterogeneous, with multifaceted causes including smoking, ageing, air pollution, infection and gene mutations. Clinically, a single pulmonary disease can exhibit more than one phenotype or coexist with multiple organ disorders. To correct abnormal function or repair injured respiratory tissues, one of the most promising techniques is to correct mutated genes by gene editing, as some gene mutations have been clearly demonstrated to be associated with genetic or heterogeneous respiratory diseases. Zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) and clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) systems are three innovative gene editing technologies developed recently. In this short review, we have summarised the structure and operating principles of the ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 systems and their preclinical and clinical applications in respiratory diseases.
    Print ISSN: 0022-2593
    Electronic ISSN: 1468-6244
    Topics: Medicine
    Published by BMJ Publishing Group
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-02-10
    Description: The neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is involved in IgG metabolism and transport in placental mammals. However, whether FcRn is responsible for IgG transfer from maternal serum to colostrum/milk is controversial. Interestingly, large domestic animals, such as cows, pigs, sheep, and horses, in which passive IgG transfer is exclusively completed via colostrum/milk, all express an FcRn α-chain that is shorter in the cytoplasmic tail (CYT) than its counterparts in humans and rodents. To address whether the length variation has any functional significance, we performed in vitro experiments using the Transwell system with the MDCK cell line stably transfected with various FcRn constructs; these clearly suggested that truncation of the CYT tail caused a polar change in IgG transfer. However, we observed no evidence supporting functional changes in IgG in vivo using mice in which the FcRn CYT was precisely truncated. These data suggest that the length variation in FcRn is not functionally associated with passive IgG transfer routes in mammals.
    Print ISSN: 0022-1767
    Electronic ISSN: 1550-6606
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-05-24
    Description: The selective hydrogenation of isophorone (3,5,5-trimethyl-2- cyclohexen-1-one) to produce 3,3,5-trimethylcyclohexanone (TMCH), an important organic solvent and pharmaceutical intermediate, is of significance in industry. However, the over-hydrogenation to produce the by-product 3,3,5-trimethylcyclohexanol causes issues. Up to now, it is still a challenge to hydrogenate isophorone to TMCH with high selectivity. In this work, we found that Lewis acids could inhibit the hydrogenation of C=O bond on isophorone, thus greatly improving the selectivity towards TMCH. In addition, added solvents like supercritical CO 2 also had a positive impact on the selectivity. Both the conversion and selectivity could be increased to more than 99% when suitable Lewis acid and solvent were employed. Nevertheless, Lewis acid also exhibited some inhibition on the hydrogenation of the C=C bond of isophorone. Hence, a relatively weak Lewis acid, ZnCl 2 , is suitable for the selective hydrogenation.
    Keywords: chemical physics, green chemistry
    Electronic ISSN: 2054-5703
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Published by Royal Society
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-05-11
    Description: This phase 1 study evaluated frontline brentuximab vedotin in combination with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, and prednisone (BV+CHP; 6 cycles, then up to 10 cycles of brentuximab vedotin monotherapy) in 26 patients with CD30 + peripheral T-cell lymphoma, including 19 with systemic anaplastic large cell lymphoma. All patients (100%) achieved an objective response, with a complete remission (CR) rate of 92%; none received a consolidative stem cell transplant. After a median observation period of 59.6 months (range, 4.6-66.0) from first dose, neither the median progression-free survival (PFS) nor the median overall survival (OS) was reached. No progression or death was observed beyond 35 months. The estimated 5-year PFS and OS rates were 52% and 80%, respectively. Eighteen of 19 patients (95%) with treatment-emergent peripheral neuropathy (PN) reported resolution or improvement of symptoms. Thirteen patients (50%) remained in remission at the end of the study, with PFS ranging from 37.8+ to 66.0+ months. Eight of these 13 patients received the maximum 16 cycles of study treatment. These final results demonstrate durable remissions in 50% of patients treated with frontline BV+CHP, suggesting a potentially curative treatment option for some patients. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT01309789.
    Keywords: Lymphoid Neoplasia, Brief Reports, Clinical Trials and Observations
    Print ISSN: 0006-4971
    Electronic ISSN: 1528-0020
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2014-03-05
    Description: Recognition of modified histones by 'reader' proteins plays a critical role in the regulation of chromatin. H3K36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) is deposited onto the nucleosomes in the transcribed regions after RNA polymerase II elongation. In yeast, this mark in turn recruits epigenetic regulators to reset the chromatin to a relatively repressive state, thus suppressing cryptic transcription. However, much less is known about the role of H3K36me3 in transcription regulation in mammals. This is further complicated by the transcription-coupled incorporation of the histone variant H3.3 in gene bodies. Here we show that the candidate tumour suppressor ZMYND11 specifically recognizes H3K36me3 on H3.3 (H3.3K36me3) and regulates RNA polymerase II elongation. Structural studies show that in addition to the trimethyl-lysine binding by an aromatic cage within the PWWP domain, the H3.3-dependent recognition is mediated by the encapsulation of the H3.3-specific 'Ser 31' residue in a composite pocket formed by the tandem bromo-PWWP domains of ZMYND11. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing shows a genome-wide co-localization of ZMYND11 with H3K36me3 and H3.3 in gene bodies, and its occupancy requires the pre-deposition of H3.3K36me3. Although ZMYND11 is associated with highly expressed genes, it functions as an unconventional transcription co-repressor by modulating RNA polymerase II at the elongation stage. ZMYND11 is critical for the repression of a transcriptional program that is essential for tumour cell growth; low expression levels of ZMYND11 in breast cancer patients correlate with worse prognosis. Consistently, overexpression of ZMYND11 suppresses cancer cell growth in vitro and tumour formation in mice. Together, this study identifies ZMYND11 as an H3.3-specific reader of H3K36me3 that links the histone-variant-mediated transcription elongation control to tumour suppression.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wen, Hong -- Li, Yuanyuan -- Xi, Yuanxin -- Jiang, Shiming -- Stratton, Sabrina -- Peng, Danni -- Tanaka, Kaori -- Ren, Yongfeng -- Xia, Zheng -- Wu, Jun -- Li, Bing -- Barton, Michelle C -- Li, Wei -- Li, Haitao -- Shi, Xiaobing -- CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Apr 10;508(7495):263-8. doi: 10.1038/nature13045. Epub 2014 Mar 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3]. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [3]. ; 1] Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2]. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3] Genes and Development Graduate Program, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Teaxs 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24590075" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Breast Neoplasms/*genetics/metabolism/*pathology ; Carrier Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Chromatin/genetics/metabolism ; Co-Repressor Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disease-Free Survival ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Histones/chemistry/*metabolism ; Humans ; Lysine/*metabolism ; Methylation ; Mice ; Mice, Nude ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Oncogenes/genetics ; Prognosis ; Protein Binding ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; RNA Polymerase II/*metabolism ; Substrate Specificity ; *Transcription Elongation, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2016-01-14
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhou, Feng -- Lin, Qibing -- Zhu, Lihong -- Ren, Yulong -- Zhou, Kunneng -- Shabek, Nitzan -- Wu, Fuqing -- Mao, Haibin -- Dong, Wei -- Gan, Lu -- Ma, Weiwei -- Gao, He -- Chen, Jun -- Yang, Chao -- Wang, Dan -- Tan, Junjie -- Zhang, Xin -- Guo, Xiuping -- Wang, Jiulin -- Jiang, Ling -- Liu, Xi -- Chen, Weiqi -- Chu, Jinfang -- Yan, Cunyu -- Ueno, Kotomi -- Ito, Shinsaku -- Asami, Tadao -- Cheng, Zhijun -- Wang, Jie -- Lei, Cailin -- Zhai, Huqu -- Wu, Chuanyin -- Wang, Haiyang -- Zheng, Ning -- Wan, Jianmin -- England -- Nature. 2016 Apr 21;532(7599):402. doi: 10.1038/nature16537. Epub 2016 Jan 13.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26760207" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2016-03-31
    Description: Transected axons fail to regrow in the mature central nervous system. Astrocytic scars are widely regarded as causal in this failure. Here, using three genetically targeted loss-of-function manipulations in adult mice, we show that preventing astrocyte scar formation, attenuating scar-forming astrocytes, or ablating chronic astrocytic scars all failed to result in spontaneous regrowth of transected corticospinal, sensory or serotonergic axons through severe spinal cord injury (SCI) lesions. By contrast, sustained local delivery via hydrogel depots of required axon-specific growth factors not present in SCI lesions, plus growth-activating priming injuries, stimulated robust, laminin-dependent sensory axon regrowth past scar-forming astrocytes and inhibitory molecules in SCI lesions. Preventing astrocytic scar formation significantly reduced this stimulated axon regrowth. RNA sequencing revealed that astrocytes and non-astrocyte cells in SCI lesions express multiple axon-growth-supporting molecules. Our findings show that contrary to the prevailing dogma, astrocyte scar formation aids rather than prevents central nervous system axon regeneration.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Anderson, Mark A -- Burda, Joshua E -- Ren, Yilong -- Ao, Yan -- O'Shea, Timothy M -- Kawaguchi, Riki -- Coppola, Giovanni -- Khakh, Baljit S -- Deming, Timothy J -- Sofroniew, Michael V -- MH099559A/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- MH104069/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- NS057624/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- NS060677/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- NS084030/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- P30 NS062691/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Apr 14;532(7598):195-200. doi: 10.1038/nature17623. Epub 2016 Mar 30.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Neurobiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1763, USA. ; Departments of Psychiatry and Neurology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1761, USA. ; Department of Physiology, David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095-1751, USA. ; Departments of Bioengineering, Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90095-1600, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27027288" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Astrocytes/*pathology ; Axons/*physiology ; Central Nervous System/cytology/*pathology/*physiology ; Chondroitin Sulfate Proteoglycans/biosynthesis ; Cicatrix/*pathology/prevention & control ; Female ; Genomics ; Mice ; *Models, Biological ; *Nerve Regeneration ; Reproducibility of Results ; Spinal Cord Injuries/genetics/pathology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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