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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-01-09
    Description: Three-component fermions with surface Fermi arcs in tungsten carbide Three-component fermions with surface Fermi arcs in tungsten carbide, Published online: 08 January 2018; doi:10.1038/s41567-017-0021-8 Triply degenerate electronic structure—three-component fermions—protected by crystal symmetries is observed in tungsten carbide. The observed Fermi arcs associated with the surface states provide evidence of the non-trivial topology of the states.
    Print ISSN: 1745-2473
    Electronic ISSN: 1745-2481
    Topics: Physics
    Published by Springer Nature
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-11-16
    Description: RNA interference (RNAi) is a conserved mechanism in which small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) guide the degradation of cognate RNAs, but also promote heterochromatin assembly at repetitive DNA elements such as centromeric repeats. However, the full extent of RNAi functions and its endogenous targets have not been explored. Here we show that, in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, RNAi and heterochromatin factors cooperate to silence diverse loci, including sexual differentiation genes, genes encoding transmembrane proteins, and retrotransposons that are also targeted by the exosome RNA degradation machinery. In the absence of the exosome, transcripts are processed preferentially by the RNAi machinery, revealing siRNA clusters and a corresponding increase in heterochromatin modifications across large domains containing genes and retrotransposons. We show that the generation of siRNAs and heterochromatin assembly by RNAi is triggered by a mechanism involving the canonical poly(A) polymerase Pla1 and an associated RNA surveillance factor Red1, which also activate the exosome. Notably, siRNA production and heterochromatin modifications at these target loci are regulated by environmental growth conditions, and by developmental signals that induce gene expression during sexual differentiation. Our analyses uncover an interaction between RNAi and the exosome that is conserved in Drosophila, and show that differentiation signals modulate RNAi silencing to regulate developmental genes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3554839/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3554839/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yamanaka, Soichiro -- Mehta, Sameet -- Reyes-Turcu, Francisca E -- Zhuang, Fanglei -- Fuchs, Ryan T -- Rong, Yikang -- Robb, Gregory B -- Grewal, Shiv I S -- Z01 BC010523-04/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- Z01 BC010523-05/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- ZIA BC010523-07/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- ZIA BC010523-09/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- ZIA BC010523-10/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- ZIA BC011208-01/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- ZIA BC011208-02/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- ZIA BC011208-03/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- ZIA BC011208-04/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jan 24;493(7433):557-60. doi: 10.1038/nature11716. Epub 2012 Nov 14.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23151475" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Drosophila melanogaster/genetics ; Exome/genetics ; Gene Expression Regulation, Fungal/*genetics ; Genes, Fungal/*genetics ; Heterochromatin/genetics ; Multigene Family/genetics ; Polynucleotide Adenylyltransferase/genetics ; *RNA Interference ; RNA Stability/genetics ; RNA, Fungal/genetics ; RNA, Small Interfering/genetics ; Retroelements/*genetics ; Schizosaccharomyces/cytology/enzymology/*genetics/*growth & development ; Schizosaccharomyces pombe Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Sex Differentiation/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-07-19
    Description: We fabricated a perovskite solar cell that uses a double layer of mesoporous TiO2 and ZrO2 as a scaffold infiltrated with perovskite and does not require a hole-conducting layer. The perovskite was produced by drop-casting a solution of PbI2, methylammonium (MA) iodide, and 5-ammoniumvaleric acid (5-AVA) iodide through a porous carbon film. The 5-AVA templating created mixed-cation perovskite (5-AVA)x(MA)1- xPbI3 crystals with lower defect concentration and better pore filling as well as more complete contact with the TiO2 scaffold, resulting in a longer exciton lifetime and a higher quantum yield for photoinduced charge separation as compared to MAPbI3. The cell achieved a certified power conversion efficiency of 12.8% and was stable for 〉1000 hours in ambient air under full sunlight.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Mei, Anyi -- Li, Xiong -- Liu, Linfeng -- Ku, Zhiliang -- Liu, Tongfa -- Rong, Yaoguang -- Xu, Mi -- Hu, Min -- Chen, Jiangzhao -- Yang, Ying -- Gratzel, Michael -- Han, Hongwei -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Jul 18;345(6194):295-8. doi: 10.1126/science.1254763.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Michael Gratzel Center for Mesoscopic Solar Cells, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, Hubei, People's Republic of China. ; Laboratory for Photonics and Interfaces, Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015 Lausanne, Switzerland. ; Michael Gratzel Center for Mesoscopic Solar Cells, Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics, School of Optical and Electronic Information, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074, Hubei, People's Republic of China. hongwei.han@mail.hust.edu.cn.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25035487" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2015-02-18
    Description: Autophagy, an important catabolic pathway implicated in a broad spectrum of human diseases, begins by forming double membrane autophagosomes that engulf cytosolic cargo and ends by fusing autophagosomes with lysosomes for degradation. Membrane fusion activity is required for early biogenesis of autophagosomes and late degradation in lysosomes. However, the key regulatory mechanisms of autophagic membrane tethering and fusion remain largely unknown. Here we report that ATG14 (also known as beclin-1-associated autophagy-related key regulator (Barkor) or ATG14L), an essential autophagy-specific regulator of the class III phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase complex, promotes membrane tethering of protein-free liposomes, and enhances hemifusion and full fusion of proteoliposomes reconstituted with the target (t)-SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) syntaxin 17 (STX17) and SNAP29, and the vesicle (v)-SNARE VAMP8 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 8). ATG14 binds to the SNARE core domain of STX17 through its coiled-coil domain, and stabilizes the STX17-SNAP29 binary t-SNARE complex on autophagosomes. The STX17 binding, membrane tethering and fusion-enhancing activities of ATG14 require its homo-oligomerization by cysteine repeats. In ATG14 homo-oligomerization-defective cells, autophagosomes still efficiently form but their fusion with endolysosomes is blocked. Recombinant ATG14 homo-oligomerization mutants also completely lose their ability to promote membrane tethering and to enhance SNARE-mediated fusion in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest an autophagy-specific membrane fusion mechanism in which oligomeric ATG14 directly binds to STX17-SNAP29 binary t-SNARE complex on autophagosomes and primes it for VAMP8 interaction to promote autophagosome-endolysosome fusion.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4442024/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4442024/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Diao, Jiajie -- Liu, Rong -- Rong, Yueguang -- Zhao, Minglei -- Zhang, Jing -- Lai, Ying -- Zhou, Qiangjun -- Wilz, Livia M -- Li, Jianxu -- Vivona, Sandro -- Pfuetzner, Richard A -- Brunger, Axel T -- Zhong, Qing -- 5P30CA142543/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P41 GM103403/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA133228/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 R37-MH63105/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R37 MH063105/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007232/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Apr 23;520(7548):563-6. doi: 10.1038/nature14147. Epub 2015 Feb 9.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA [2] Department of Structural Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA [3] Department of Photon Science, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA [4] Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA [5] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; 1] Center for Autophagy Research, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA [2] Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA [3] College of Food Science &Nutritional Engineering, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100083, China. ; 1] Center for Autophagy Research, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA [2] Department of Biochemistry, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; Division of Biochemistry, Biophysics and Structural Biology, Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25686604" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptor Proteins, Vesicular Transport/*chemistry/*metabolism ; *Autophagy ; Endosomes/*metabolism ; HEK293 Cells ; HeLa Cells ; Humans ; Lysosomes/*metabolism ; *Membrane Fusion ; Phagosomes/chemistry/*metabolism ; Protein Binding ; Protein Multimerization ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Qa-SNARE Proteins/metabolism ; Qb-SNARE Proteins/metabolism ; Qc-SNARE Proteins/metabolism ; R-SNARE Proteins/metabolism ; SNARE Proteins/chemistry/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    ISSN: 1750-3841
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: : This study was to evaluate the effectiveness of steam or steam in combination with an antimicrobial agent to control Listeria monocytogenes on ready-to-eat (RTE) franks. The franks were surface-inoculated to contain 6 or 3 log10(colony-forming units [CFU])/cm2 of L. monocytogenes and treated with steam or steam in combination with an antimicrobial agent, immediately followed by vacuum-sealing the top films of frank packages (6 franks per package in a single layer). Three log (CFU) /cm2 of reductions were achieved at the both inoculation levels for L. monocytogenes on franks. At an inoculation level of 3 logs, no outgrowth of L. monocytogenes was obtained on the treated franks after storing at 4.4°C or 16°C for a combined 47 d. This study provided an alternative approach for controlling L. monocytogenes in packaged franks.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    Cryobiology 24 (1987), S. 585 
    ISSN: 0011-2240
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    ISSN: 0040-6031
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Amsterdam : Elsevier
    Talanta 40 (1993), S. 1883-1889 
    ISSN: 0039-9140
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    ISSN: 0006-291X
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Physics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2018-09-21
    Description: Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have witnessed rapidly rising power conversion efficiencies, together with advances in stability and upscaling. Despite these advances, their limited stability and need to prove upscaling remain crucial hurdles on the path to commercialization. We summarize recent advances toward commercially viable PSCs and discuss challenges that remain. We expound the development of standardized protocols to distinguish intrinsic and extrinsic degradation factors in perovskites. We review accelerated aging tests in both cells and modules and discuss the prediction of lifetimes on the basis of degradation kinetics. Mature photovoltaic solutions, which have demonstrated excellent long-term stability in field applications, offer the perovskite community valuable insights into clearing the hurdles to commercialization.
    Keywords: Physics, Applied, Chemistry, Online Only
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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