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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-08-16
    Description: The potential disrupting effects of Azo dye on wastewater nutrients removal deserved more analysis. In this study, 15 days exposure experiments were conducted with alizarin yellow R (AYR) as a model dye to determine whether the dye caused adverse effects on biological removal of both the dye and nutrients in acclimated anaerobic–aerobic–anoxic sequencing batch reactors. The results showed that the AYR removal efficiency was, respectively, 85.7% and 66.8% at AYR concentrations of 50 and 200 mg l –1 , while higher AYR inlet (400 mg l –1 ) might inactivate sludge. Lower removal of AYR at 200 mg l –1 of AYR was due to the insufficient support of electron donors in the anaerobic process. However, the decolorized by-products p -phenylenediamine and 5-aminosalicylic were completely decomposed in the following aerobic stage at both 50 and 200 mg l –1 of AYR concentrations. Compared with the absence of AYR, the presence of 200 mg l –1 of AYR decreased the total nitrogen removal efficiency from 82.4 to 41.1%, and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency initially decreased to 68.1% and then returned to around 83.4% in the long-term exposure time. It was also found that the inhibition of AYR, nitrogen and COD removal induced by a higher concentration of AYR was due to the increased intracellular reactive oxygen species production, which caused the rise of oxidation–reduction potential value and decreased ammonia monooxygenase and nitrite oxidoreductase activities.
    Keywords: environmental science
    Electronic ISSN: 2054-5703
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Published by Royal Society
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-02-10
    Description: Macrophages populate the healthy myocardium and, depending on their phenotype, may contribute to tissue homeostasis or disease. Their origin and role in diastolic dysfunction, a hallmark of cardiac aging and heart failure with preserved ejection fraction, remain unclear. Here we show that cardiac macrophages expand in humans and mice with diastolic dysfunction, which in mice was induced by either hypertension or advanced age. A higher murine myocardial macrophage density results from monocyte recruitment and increased hematopoiesis in bone marrow and spleen. In humans, we observed a parallel constellation of hematopoietic activation: circulating myeloid cells are more frequent, and splenic 18 F-FDG PET/CT imaging signal correlates with echocardiographic indices of diastolic dysfunction. While diastolic dysfunction develops, cardiac macrophages produce IL-10, activate fibroblasts, and stimulate collagen deposition, leading to impaired myocardial relaxation and increased myocardial stiffness. Deletion of IL-10 in macrophages improves diastolic function. These data imply expansion and phenotypic changes of cardiac macrophages as therapeutic targets for cardiac fibrosis leading to diastolic dysfunction.
    Keywords: Cardiovascular Biology, Innate Immunity and Inflammation, Hematopoiesis
    Print ISSN: 0022-1007
    Electronic ISSN: 1540-9538
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-04-03
    Description: Because the receptor tyrosine kinase c-Met plays a critical role in tumor growth, metastasis, tumor angiogenesis, and drug resistance, the c-Met axis represents an attractive therapeutic target. Herein, we report the first preclinical characterization of SCC244, a novel, potent, and highly selective inhibitor of c-Met kinase. SCC244 showed subnanomolar potency against c-Met kinase activity and high selectivity versus 312 other tested protein kinases, making it one of the most selective c-Met inhibitors described to date. Moreover, this inhibitor profoundly and specifically inhibits c-Met signal transduction and thereby suppresses the c-Met–dependent neoplastic phenotype of tumor and endothelial cells. In xenografts of human tumor cell lines or non–small cell lung cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma patient-derived tumor tissue driven by MET aberration, SCC244 administration exhibits robust antitumor activity at the well-tolerated doses. In addition, the in vivo antitumor activity of SCC244 involves the inhibition of c-Met downstream signaling via a mechanism of combined antiproliferation and antiangiogenic effects. The results of the current study provide a strong foundation for the clinical investigation of SCC244 in patients with tumors harboring c-Met pathway alterations. Mol Cancer Ther; 17(4); 751–62. ©2017 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1535-7163
    Electronic ISSN: 1538-8514
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-11-02
    Description: Purpose: The prognosis for patients with refractory soft-tissue sarcoma (STS) is dismal. Anlotinib has previously shown antitumor activity on STS in preclinical and phase I studies. Patients and Methods: Patients 18 years and older, progressing after anthracycline-based chemotherapy, naïve from angiogenesis inhibitors, with at least one measurable lesion according to RECIST 1.1, were enrolled. The main subtypes eligible were undifferentiated pleomorphic sarcoma (UPS), liposarcoma (LPS), leiomyosarcoma (LMS), synovial sarcoma (SS), fibrosarcoma (FS), alveolar soft-part sarcoma (ASPS), and clear cell sarcoma (CCS). Participants were treated with anlotinib. The primary endpoint was progression-free rate at 12 weeks (PFR 12 weeks ). Results: A total of 166 patients were included in the final analysis. Overall, the PFR 12 weeks was 68%, and objective response rate was 13% (95% confidence interval, 7.6%–18%). The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 5.6 and 12 months, respectively. The PFR 12 weeks , median PFS and OS were: 58%, 4.1 and 11 months for UPS ( n = 19); 63%, 5.6 and 13 months for LPS ( n = 13); 75%, 11 and 15 months for LMS ( n = 26); 75%, 7.7 and 12 months for SS ( n = 47); 81%, 5.6 and 12 months for FS ( n = 18); 77%, 21 and not reached for ASPS ( n = 13); 54%, 11 and 16 months for CCS ( n = 7); and 44%, 2.8 and 8.8 months for other sarcoma ( n = 23), respectively. The most common clinically significant grade 3 or higher adverse events were hypertension (4.8%), triglyceride elevation (3.6%), and pneumothorax (2.4%). No treatment-related death occurred. Conclusions: Anlotinib showed antitumor activity in several STS entities. The toxicity was manageable. Clin Cancer Res; 24(21); 5233–8. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1078-0432
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3265
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 5
    ISSN: 1432-0916
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Mathematics , Physics
    Notes: Abstract Assuming the existence of a real torus acting through holomorphic isometries on a Kähler manifold, we construct an ansatz for Kähler-Einstein metrics and an ansatz for Kähler metrics with constant scalar curvature. Using this Hamiltonian approach we solve the differential equations in special cases and find, in particular, a family of constant scalar curvature Kähler metrics describing a non-linear superposition of the Bergman metric, the Calabi metric and a higher dimensional generalization of the LeBrun Kähler metric. The superposition contains Kähler-Einstein metrics and all the geometries are complete on the open disk bundle of some line bundle over the complex projective spaceP n. We also build such Kähler geometries on Kähler quotients of higher cohomogeneity.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 6
    ISSN: 0021-9673
    Source: Elsevier Journal Backfiles on ScienceDirect 1907 - 2002
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 7
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Springer
    Mathematische Annalen 282 (1988), S. 621-627 
    ISSN: 1432-1807
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Mathematics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2015-08-27
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tong, Yi-Gang -- Shi, Wei-Feng -- Liu, Di -- Qian, Jun -- Liang, Long -- Bo, Xiao-Chen -- Liu, Jun -- Ren, Hong-Guang -- Fan, Hang -- Ni, Ming -- Sun, Yang -- Jin, Yuan -- Teng, Yue -- Li, Zhen -- Kargbo, David -- Dafae, Foday -- Kanu, Alex -- Chen, Cheng-Chao -- Lan, Zhi-Heng -- Jiang, Hui -- Luo, Yang -- Lu, Hui-Jun -- Zhang, Xiao-Guang -- Yang, Fan -- Hu, Yi -- Cao, Yu-Xi -- Deng, Yong-Qiang -- Su, Hao-Xiang -- Sun, Yu -- Liu, Wen-Sen -- Wang, Zhuang -- Wang, Cheng-Yu -- Bu, Zhao-Yang -- Guo, Zhen-Dong -- Zhang, Liu-Bo -- Nie, Wei-Min -- Bai, Chang-Qing -- Sun, Chun-Hua -- An, Xiao-Ping -- Xu, Pei-Song -- Zhang, Xiang-Li-Lan -- Huang, Yong -- Mi, Zhi-Qiang -- Yu, Dong -- Yao, Hong-Wu -- Feng, Yong -- Xia, Zhi-Ping -- Zheng, Xue-Xing -- Yang, Song-Tao -- Lu, Bing -- Jiang, Jia-Fu -- Kargbo, Brima -- He, Fu-Chu -- Gao, George F -- Cao, Wu-Chun -- China Mobile Laboratory Testing Team in Sierra Leone -- England -- Nature. 2015 Oct 22;526(7574):595. doi: 10.1038/nature15255. Epub 2015 Aug 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26308898" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2015-05-15
    Description: A novel Ebola virus (EBOV) first identified in March 2014 has infected more than 25,000 people in West Africa, resulting in more than 10,000 deaths. Preliminary analyses of genome sequences of 81 EBOV collected from March to June 2014 from Guinea and Sierra Leone suggest that the 2014 EBOV originated from an independent transmission event from its natural reservoir followed by sustained human-to-human infections. It has been reported that the EBOV genome variation might have an effect on the efficacy of sequence-based virus detection and candidate therapeutics. However, only limited viral information has been available since July 2014, when the outbreak entered a rapid growth phase. Here we describe 175 full-length EBOV genome sequences from five severely stricken districts in Sierra Leone from 28 September to 11 November 2014. We found that the 2014 EBOV has become more phylogenetically and genetically diverse from July to November 2014, characterized by the emergence of multiple novel lineages. The substitution rate for the 2014 EBOV was estimated to be 1.23 x 10(-3) substitutions per site per year (95% highest posterior density interval, 1.04 x 10(-3) to 1.41 x 10(-3) substitutions per site per year), approximating to that observed between previous EBOV outbreaks. The sharp increase in genetic diversity of the 2014 EBOV warrants extensive EBOV surveillance in Sierra Leone, Guinea and Liberia to better understand the viral evolution and transmission dynamics of the ongoing outbreak. These data will facilitate the international efforts to develop vaccines and therapeutics.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tong, Yi-Gang -- Shi, Wei-Feng -- Liu, Di -- Qian, Jun -- Liang, Long -- Bo, Xiao-Chen -- Liu, Jun -- Ren, Hong-Guang -- Fan, Hang -- Ni, Ming -- Sun, Yang -- Jin, Yuan -- Teng, Yue -- Li, Zhen -- Kargbo, David -- Dafae, Foday -- Kanu, Alex -- Chen, Cheng-Chao -- Lan, Zhi-Heng -- Jiang, Hui -- Luo, Yang -- Lu, Hui-Jun -- Zhang, Xiao-Guang -- Yang, Fan -- Hu, Yi -- Cao, Yu-Xi -- Deng, Yong-Qiang -- Su, Hao-Xiang -- Sun, Yu -- Liu, Wen-Sen -- Wang, Zhuang -- Wang, Cheng-Yu -- Bu, Zhao-Yang -- Guo, Zhen-Dong -- Zhang, Liu-Bo -- Nie, Wei-Min -- Bai, Chang-Qing -- Sun, Chun-Hua -- An, Xiao-Ping -- Xu, Pei-Song -- Zhang, Xiang-Li-Lan -- Huang, Yong -- Mi, Zhi-Qiang -- Yu, Dong -- Yao, Hong-Wu -- Feng, Yong -- Xia, Zhi-Ping -- Zheng, Xue-Xing -- Yang, Song-Tao -- Lu, Bing -- Jiang, Jia-Fu -- Kargbo, Brima -- He, Fu-Chu -- Gao, George F -- Cao, Wu-Chun -- China Mobile Laboratory Testing Team in Sierra Leone -- England -- Nature. 2015 Aug 6;524(7563):93-6. doi: 10.1038/nature14490. Epub 2015 May 13.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉State Key Laboratory of Pathogen and Biosecurity, Beijing 100071, China. ; Institute of Pathogen Biology, Taishan Medical College, Taian 271000, China. ; Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China. ; Key Laboratory of Jilin Province for Zoonosis Prevention and Control, Changchun 130122, China. ; Beijing Key Laboratory of New Molecular Diagnostics Technology, Beijing 100850, China. ; Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206, China. ; Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation, Freetown, Sierra Leone. ; Sierra Leone-China Friendship Hospital, Freetown, Sierra Leone. ; BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China. ; Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, Cambridge CB10 1SA, UK. ; Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences &Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100730, China. ; Institute of Environmental Health and Related Product Safety, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 100021, China. ; The No. 302 Hospital, Beijing 100039, China. ; The No. 307 Hospital, Beijing 100071, China. ; Department of international cooperation, National Health and Family Planning Commission, Beijing 100044, China. ; State Key Laboratory of Proteomics, Beijing 102206, China. ; 1] Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China [2] Institute for Viral Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206, China [3] Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25970247" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2015-10-28
    Description: Epigenetic silencing including histone modifications and DNA methylation is an important tumorigenic mechanism. However, its role in cancer immunopathology and immunotherapy is poorly understood. Using human ovarian cancers as our model, here we show that enhancer of zeste homologue 2 (EZH2)-mediated histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3) and DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1)-mediated DNA methylation repress the tumour production of T helper 1 (TH1)-type chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10, and subsequently determine effector T-cell trafficking to the tumour microenvironment. Treatment with epigenetic modulators removes the repression and increases effector T-cell tumour infiltration, slows down tumour progression, and improves the therapeutic efficacy of programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1; also known as B7-H1) checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell transfusion in tumour-bearing mice. Moreover, tumour EZH2 and DNMT1 are negatively associated with tumour-infiltrating CD8(+) T cells and patient outcome. Thus, epigenetic silencing of TH1-type chemokines is a novel immune-evasion mechanism of tumours. Selective epigenetic reprogramming alters the T-cell landscape in cancer and may enhance the clinical efficacy of cancer therapy.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4779053/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4779053/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Peng, Dongjun -- Kryczek, Ilona -- Nagarsheth, Nisha -- Zhao, Lili -- Wei, Shuang -- Wang, Weimin -- Sun, Yuqing -- Zhao, Ende -- Vatan, Linda -- Szeliga, Wojciech -- Kotarski, Jan -- Tarkowski, Rafal -- Dou, Yali -- Cho, Kathleen -- Hensley-Alford, Sharon -- Munkarah, Adnan -- Liu, Rebecca -- Zou, Weiping -- 5P30CA46592/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA099985/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA123088/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA152470/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA156685/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA171306/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA190176/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA193136/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA099985/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA123088/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA152470/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA156685/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA171306/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA190176/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA193136/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Nov 12;527(7577):249-53. doi: 10.1038/nature15520. Epub 2015 Oct 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Surgery, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. ; Graduate Program in Immunology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. ; Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. ; Department of Pathology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. ; The First Department of Gynecologic Oncology and Gynecology, Medical University in Lublin, Lublin 20-081, Poland. ; The University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. ; Department of Women's Health Services, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202, USA. ; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan School of Medicine, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA. ; Graduate Program in Tumor Biology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26503055" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antigens, CD274/metabolism ; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/cytology/immunology ; Chemokine CXCL10/biosynthesis/genetics/immunology ; Chemokine CXCL9/biosynthesis/genetics/immunology ; Chemokines/biosynthesis/*genetics/immunology ; DNA (Cytosine-5-)-Methyltransferase/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism ; DNA Methylation/drug effects ; *Epigenesis, Genetic/drug effects ; Female ; *Gene Silencing ; Histones/chemistry/metabolism ; Humans ; *Immunotherapy/methods ; Lymphocytes, Tumor-Infiltrating/immunology ; Lysine/metabolism ; Mice ; Ovarian Neoplasms/enzymology/*immunology/pathology/*therapy ; Polycomb Repressive Complex 2/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism ; Prognosis ; Th1 Cells/immunology/*metabolism ; Tumor Cells, Cultured ; Tumor Escape/immunology ; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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