Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-10-02
    Description: Background: Kita-Kyushu lung cancer antigen-1 (KK-LC-1) is a cancer/testis antigen and predominant target for cancer immunotherapy. Its detection is only established based on gene expression. In this study, we established a monoclonal antibody against KK-LC-1 to detect its protein expression in formalin-fixed samples. Materials and Methods: The monoclonal antibody against KK-LC-1 was evaluated and the detection of KK-LC-1 between gene expression and protein expression was compared in patients with breast cancer. The monoclonal antibody clone 34B3, which we established, stained testicular germ cells positively. Results: The rates of detection of KK-LC-1 gene and protein expression were 11.8% and 52.9%, respectively. Protein expression was detected in all triple-negative breast cancer cases studied (n=8). Furthermore, KK-LC-1 was detected in all tumours without oestrogen receptor expression. Conclusion: This study indicated that KK-LC-1 expression was detected in breast cancer, especially in oestrogen receptor-negative subtypes.
    Print ISSN: 0250-7005
    Electronic ISSN: 1791-7530
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: EXPRESSION ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION ; COLONY-STIMULATING FACTOR ; CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE ; ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK ; GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION ; LYMPHOCYTE ; CHARGE CONSORTIUM ; DIFFERENTIAL LEUKOCYTE COUNT ; GENETIC-VARIANTS ; PROSTATE-CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY
    Abstract: White blood cell (WBC) count is a common clinical measure from complete blood count assays, and it varies widely among healthy individuals. Total WBC count and its constituent subtypes have been shown to be moderately heritable, with the heritability estimates varying across cell types. We studied 19,509 subjects from seven cohorts in a discovery analysis, and 11,823 subjects from ten cohorts for replication analyses, to determine genetic factors influencing variability within the normal hematological range for total WBC count and five WBC subtype measures. Cohort specific data was supplied by the CHARGE, HeamGen, and INGI consortia, as well as independent collaborative studies. We identified and replicated ten associations with total WBC count and five WBC subtypes at seven different genomic loci (total WBC count-6p21 in the HLA region, 17q21 near ORMDL3, and CSF3; neutrophil count-17q21; basophil count- 3p21 near RPN1 and C3orf27; lymphocyte count-6p21, 19p13 at EPS15L1; monocyte count-2q31 at ITGA4, 3q21, 8q24 an intergenic region, 9q31 near EDG2), including three previously reported associations and seven novel associations. To investigate functional relationships among variants contributing to variability in the six WBC traits, we utilized gene expression- and pathways-based analyses. We implemented gene-clustering algorithms to evaluate functional connectivity among implicated loci and showed functional relationships across cell types. Gene expression data from whole blood was utilized to show that significant biological consequences can be extracted from our genome-wide analyses, with effect estimates for significant loci from the meta-analyses being highly corellated with the proximal gene expression. In addition, collaborative efforts between the groups contributing to this study and related studies conducted by the COGENT and RIKEN groups allowed for the examination of effect homogeneity for genome-wide significant associations across populations of diverse ancestral backgrounds.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21738480
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-07-02
    Description: Lipidomics, the mass spectrometry-based comprehensive analysis of lipids, has attracted attention as an analytical approach to provide novel insight into lipid metabolism and to search for biomarkers. However, an ideal method for both comprehensive and quantitative analysis of lipids has not been fully developed. Here, we have proposed a practical methodology for widely targeted quantitative lipidome analysis using supercritical fluid chromatography fast-scanning triple-quadrupole mass spectrometry (SFC/QqQMS) and theoretically calculated a comprehensive lipid multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) library. Lipid classes can be separated by SFC with a normal-phase diethylamine-bonded silica column with high resolution, high throughput, and good repeatability. Structural isomers of phospholipids can be monitored by mass spectrometric separation with fatty acyl-based MRM transitions. SFC/QqQMS analysis with an internal standard-dilution method offers quantitative information for both lipid class and individual lipid molecular species in the same lipid class. Additionally, data acquired using this method has advantages, including reduction of misidentification and acceleration of data analysis. Using the SFC/QqQMS system, alteration of plasma lipid levels in myocardial infarction-prone rabbits to the supplementation of EPA was first observed. Our developed SFC/QqQMS method represents a potentially useful tool for in-depth studies focused on complex lipid metabolism and biomarker discovery.—Takeda, H., Y. Izumi, M. Takahashi, T. Paxton, S. Tamura, T. Koike, Y. Yu, N. Kato, K. Nagase, M. Shiomi, and T. Bamba.
    Print ISSN: 0022-2275
    Electronic ISSN: 1539-7262
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-07-03
    Description: Adjuvant chemotherapy is used for human breast cancer patients, even after curative surgery of primary tumor, to prevent tumor recurrence primarily as a form of metastasis. However, anticancer drugs can accelerate metastasis in several mouse metastasis models. Hence, we examined the effects of postsurgical administration with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide, on lung metastasis process, which developed after the resection of the primary tumor arising from the orthotopic injection of a mouse triple-negative breast cancer cell line, 4T1. Only 5-FU markedly increased the numbers and sizes of lung metastasis foci, with enhanced tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis as evidenced by increases in Ki67-positive cell numbers and CD31-positive areas, respectively. 5-FU–mediated augmented lung metastasis was associated with increases in intrapulmonary neutrophil numbers and expression of neutrophilic chemokines, Cxcl1 and Cxcl2 in tumor cells, with few effects on intrapulmonary T-cell or macrophage numbers. 5-FU enhanced Cxcl1 and Cxcl2 expression in 4T1 cells in a NFB-dependent manner. Moreover, the administration of a neutrophil-depleting antibody or a Cxcr2 antagonist, SB225002, significantly attenuated 5-FU–mediated enhanced lung metastasis with depressed neutrophil infiltration. Furthermore, infiltrating neutrophils and 4T1 cells abundantly expressed prokineticin-2 ( Prok2 ) and its receptor, Prokr1 , respectively. Finally, the administration of 5-FU after the resection of the primary tumor failed to augment lung metastasis in the mice receiving Prokr1 -deleted 4T1 cells. Collectively, 5-FU can enhance lung metastasis by inducing tumor cells to produce Cxcl1 and Cxcl2, which induced the migration of neutrophils expressing Prok2 with a capacity to enhance 4T1 cell proliferation. Mol Cancer Ther; 17(7); 1515–25. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1535-7163
    Electronic ISSN: 1538-8514
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2015-05-07
    Description: Pluripotency, the ability to generate any cell type of the body, is an evanescent attribute of embryonic cells. Transitory pluripotent cells can be captured at different time points during embryogenesis and maintained as embryonic stem cells or epiblast stem cells in culture. Since ontogenesis is a dynamic process in both space and time, it seems counterintuitive that these two temporal states represent the full spectrum of organismal pluripotency. Here we show that by modulating culture parameters, a stem-cell type with unique spatial characteristics and distinct molecular and functional features, designated as region-selective pluripotent stem cells (rsPSCs), can be efficiently obtained from mouse embryos and primate pluripotent stem cells, including humans. The ease of culturing and editing the genome of human rsPSCs offers advantages for regenerative medicine applications. The unique ability of human rsPSCs to generate post-implantation interspecies chimaeric embryos may facilitate our understanding of early human development and evolution.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wu, Jun -- Okamura, Daiji -- Li, Mo -- Suzuki, Keiichiro -- Luo, Chongyuan -- Ma, Li -- He, Yupeng -- Li, Zhongwei -- Benner, Chris -- Tamura, Isao -- Krause, Marie N -- Nery, Joseph R -- Du, Tingting -- Zhang, Zhuzhu -- Hishida, Tomoaki -- Takahashi, Yuta -- Aizawa, Emi -- Kim, Na Young -- Lajara, Jeronimo -- Guillen, Pedro -- Campistol, Josep M -- Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez -- Ross, Pablo J -- Saghatelian, Alan -- Ren, Bing -- Ecker, Joseph R -- Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 May 21;521(7552):316-21. doi: 10.1038/nature14413. Epub 2015 May 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Gene Expression Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Genomic Analysis Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Genomic Analysis Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Integrated Genomics, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0653, USA. ; 1] The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Gene Expression Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] Life Science Center, Tsukuba Advanced Research Alliance, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennoudai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577, Japan. ; Grado en Medicina, Universidad Catolica, San Antonio de Murcia, Campus de los Jeronimos, 135, Guadalupe 30107, Spain. ; 1] Grado en Medicina, Universidad Catolica, San Antonio de Murcia, Campus de los Jeronimos, 135, Guadalupe 30107, Spain [2] Fundacion Pedro Guillen, Clinica Cemtro, Avenida Ventisquero de la Condesa, 42, 28035 Madrid, Spain. ; Hospital Clinic of Barcelona, Carrer Villarroel, 170, 08036 Barcelona, Spain. ; University of California, Davis, Davis, California 95616, USA. ; The Salk Institute for Biological Studies, Peptide Biology Laboratory, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25945737" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Culture Techniques/methods ; Cell Line ; *Chimera ; Embryonic Stem Cells/cytology ; Female ; Germ Layers/cytology ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/cytology ; Male ; Mice ; Pan troglodytes ; Pluripotent Stem Cells/*cytology/metabolism ; Regenerative Medicine ; Species Specificity
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2011-06-11
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Takahashi, Yoshiko -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jun 10;332(6035):1241. doi: 10.1126/science.1209050.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21659571" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Biomedical Research/economics/*trends ; Career Choice ; Culture ; Japan ; Research Support as Topic
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2012-06-23
    Description: The autonomic nervous system, which includes the sympathetic neurons and adrenal medulla, originates from the neural crest. Combining avian blood vessel-specific gene manipulation and mouse genetics, we addressed a long-standing question of how neural crest cells (NCCs) generate sympathetic and medullary lineages during embryogenesis. We found that the dorsal aorta acts as a morphogenetic signaling center that coordinates NCC migration and cell lineage segregation. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) produced by the dorsal aorta are critical for the production of the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF -1) and Neuregulin 1 in the para-aortic region, which act as chemoattractants for early migration. Later, BMP signaling is directly involved in the sympatho-medullary segregation. This study provides insights into the complex developmental signaling cascade that instructs one of the earliest events of neurovascular interactions guiding embryonic development.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Saito, Daisuke -- Takase, Yuta -- Murai, Hidetaka -- Takahashi, Yoshiko -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Jun 22;336(6088):1578-81. doi: 10.1126/science.1222369.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, Ikoma, Nara, Japan.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22723422" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adrenal Cortex/embryology/metabolism ; Adrenal Medulla/*cytology/embryology ; Animals ; Aorta/*embryology/*metabolism ; Avian Proteins/metabolism ; Bone Morphogenetic Proteins/*metabolism ; Cell Line ; Cell Lineage ; Cell Movement ; Chemokine CXCL12/metabolism ; Chemotactic Factors/metabolism ; Chick Embryo ; Coculture Techniques ; Embryonic Development ; Ganglia, Sympathetic/*cytology ; Mice ; Mice, Knockout ; Morphogenesis ; Neural Crest/*cytology/physiology ; Neuregulin-1/metabolism ; Signal Transduction ; Stem Cells/cytology/physiology
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-07-05
    Description: Correction: eEF-2 kinase is a critical regulator of Warbrug effect through controlling PP2A-A synthesis Correction: eEF-2 kinase is a critical regulator of Warbrug effect through controlling PP2A-A synthesis, Published online: 04 July 2018; doi:10.1038/s41388-018-0322-0 Correction: eEF-2 kinase is a critical regulator of Warbrug effect through controlling PP2A-A synthesis
    Print ISSN: 0950-9232
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2015-08-15
    Description: Human vocal development occurs through two parallel interactive processes that transform infant cries into more mature vocalizations, such as cooing sounds and babbling. First, natural categories of sounds change as the vocal apparatus matures. Second, parental vocal feedback sensitizes infants to certain features of those sounds, and the sounds are modified accordingly. Paradoxically, our closest living ancestors, nonhuman primates, are thought to undergo few or no production-related acoustic changes during development, and any such changes are thought to be impervious to social feedback. Using early and dense sampling, quantitative tracking of acoustic changes, and biomechanical modeling, we showed that vocalizations in infant marmoset monkeys undergo dramatic changes that cannot be solely attributed to simple consequences of growth. Using parental interaction experiments, we found that contingent parental feedback influences the rate of vocal development. These findings overturn decades-old ideas about primate vocalizations and show that marmoset monkeys are a compelling model system for early vocal development in humans.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Takahashi, D Y -- Fenley, A R -- Teramoto, Y -- Narayanan, D Z -- Borjon, J I -- Holmes, P -- Ghazanfar, A A -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Aug 14;349(6249):734-8. doi: 10.1126/science.aab1058.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA. Department of Psychology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA. ; Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA. ; Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA. Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Program in Applied and Computational Mathematics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA. ; Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA. Department of Psychology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA. Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26273055" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Acoustics ; Animals ; Biomechanical Phenomena ; Callithrix/*growth & development/physiology/psychology ; Female ; Male ; Models, Biological ; Muscle Tonus ; Vocal Cords/growth & development/physiology ; *Vocalization, Animal
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2018-12-04
    Description: Purpose: Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant disorder caused by inactivating mutations of the TSC1 or TSC2 gene, characterized by neurocognitive impairment and benign tumors of the brain, skin, heart, and kidneys. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a diffuse proliferation of α-smooth muscle actin–positive cells associated with cystic destruction of the lung. LAM occurs almost exclusively in women, as a TSC manifestation or a sporadic disorder ( TSC1/TSC2 somatic mutations). Biomarkers of whole-body tumor burden/activity and response to rapalogs or other therapies remain needed in TSC/LAM. Experimental Design: These preclinical studies aimed to assess feasibility of [ 18 F]fluorocholine (FCH) and [ 18 F]fluoroacetate (FACE) as TSC/LAM metabolic imaging biomarkers. Results: We previously reported that TSC2-deficient cells enhance phosphatidylcholine synthesis via the Kennedy pathway. Here, we show that TSC2-deficient cells exhibit rapid uptake of [ 18 F]FCH in vivo and can be visualized by PET imaging in preclinical models of TSC/LAM, including subcutaneous tumors and pulmonary nodules. Treatment with rapamycin (72 hours) suppressed [ 18 F]FCH standardized uptake value (SUV) by 〉50% in tumors. Interestingly, [ 18 F]FCH-PET imaging of TSC2-deficient xenografts in ovariectomized mice also showed a significant decrease in tumor SUV. Finally, we found rapamycin-insensitive uptake of FACE by TSC2-deficient cells in vitro and in vivo , reflecting its mitochondrial accumulation via inhibition of aconitase, a TCA cycle enzyme. Conclusions: Preclinical models of TSC2 deficiency represent informative platforms to identify tracers of potential clinical interest. Our findings provide mechanistic evidence for testing the potential of [ 18 F]FCH and [ 18 F]FACE as metabolic imaging biomarkers for TSC and LAM proliferative lesions, and novel insights into the metabolic reprogramming of TSC tumors.
    Print ISSN: 1078-0432
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3265
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...