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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; RISKS ; AGE ; WOMEN ; OBESITY ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; TOBACCO ; GLUCOSE ; BODY ; DIABETES-MELLITUS ; nutrition ; pancreatic cancer ; RELATIVE RISK ; physical activity ; MASS INDEX ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; HEIGHT ; WAIST ; INTERVAL ; pancreatic ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; PARTICIPANTS ; anthropometry ; prospective ; RISK-FACTOR ; BODY-FAT DISTRIBUTION ; hip ; MALE SMOKERS
    Abstract: Tobacco smoking is the only established risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Results from several epidemiologic studies have suggested that increased body mass index and/or lack of physical activity may be associated with an increased risk of this disease. We examined the relationship between anthropometry and physical activity recorded at baseline and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (n = 438,405 males and females age 19-84 years and followed for a total of 2,826,070 person-years). Relative risks (RR) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models stratified by age, sex, and country and adjusted for smoking and self-reported diabetes and, where appropriate, height. In total, there were 324 incident cases of pancreatic cancer diagnosed in the cohort over an average of 6 years of follow-up. There was evidence that the RR of pancreatic cancer was associated with increased height [RR, 1.74; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.20-2.52] for highest quartile compared with lowest quartile (P-trend = 0.001). However, this trend was primarily due to a low risk in the lowest quartile, as when this group was excluded, the trend was no longer statistically significant (P = 0.27). A larger waist-to-hip ratio and waist circumference were both associated with an increased risk of developing the disease (RR per 0.1, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.04-1.48; P-trend = 0.02 and RR per 10 cm, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.01-1.26; P-trend = 0.03, respectively). There was a nonsignificant increased risk of pancreatic cancer with increasing body mass index (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.95-1.24 per 5 kg/m(2)), and a nonsignificant decreased risk with total physical activity (RR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.50-1.35 for most active versus inactive). Future studies should consider including measurements of waist and hip circumference, to further investigate the relationship between central adiposity and the risk of pancreatic cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16702364
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; HISTORY ; RISK ; TIME ; ASSOCIATION ; HEALTH ; CIGARETTE-SMOKING ; smoking ; cancer risk ; ethanol ; NETHERLANDS ; ALCOHOL ; PROJECT ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; pancreatic cancer ; LIFE-STYLE FACTORS ; pancreas ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; WEIGHT ; DIETARY-INTAKE MEASUREMENTS ; BEER ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; MALE SMOKERS ; BEVERAGE CONSUMPTION ; COFFEE CONSUMPTION
    Abstract: To examine the association of baseline and lifetime ethanol intake with cancer of the pancreas in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Included in this analysis were 478,400 subjects, of whom detailed information on the intake of alcoholic beverages at baseline and over lifetime was collected between 1992 and 2000. During a median follow-up time of 8.9 years, 555 non-endocrine pancreatic cancer cases were observed. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association of ethanol intake at recruitment and average lifetime ethanol intake and pancreatic cancer adjusting for smoking, height, weight, and history of diabetes. Overall, neither ethanol intake at recruitment (relative risk (RR) = 0.94, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69-1.27 comparing 30+ g/d vs. 0.1-4.9 g/d) nor average lifetime ethanol intake (RR = 0.95, 95% CI 0.65-1.39) was associated with pancreatic cancer risk. High lifetime ethanol intake from spirits/liquor at recruitment tended to be associated with a higher risk (RR = 1.40, 95% CI 0.93-2.10 comparing 10+ g/d vs. 0.1-4.9 g/d), but no associations were observed for wine and beer consumption. These results suggest no association of alcohol consumption with the risk of pancreatic cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19145468
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  • 3
    Keywords: SURVIVAL ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; HEALTH ; POPULATIONS ; INEQUALITIES ; DETERMINANTS ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; METAANALYSIS ; socioeconomic status ; SOCIOECONOMIC-STATUS ; Educational level ; Pancreatic cancer incidence
    Abstract: Introduction: Until now, studies examining the relationship between socioeconomic status and pancreatic cancer incidence have been inconclusive. Aim: To prospectively investigate to what extent pancreatic cancer incidence varies according to educational level within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Methods: In the EPIC study, socioeconomic status at baseline was measured using the highest level of education attained. Hazard ratios by educational level and a summary index, the relative indices of inequality (Rh), were estimated using Cox regression models stratified by age, gender, and center and adjusted for known risk factors. In addition, we conducted separate analyses by age, gender and geographical region. Results: Within the source population of 407, 944 individuals at baseline, 490 first incident primary pancreatic adenocarcinoma cases were identified in 9 European countries. The crude difference in risk of pancreatic cancer according to level of education was small and not statistically significant (RII = 1.14, 95% CI 0.80-1.62). Adjustment for known risk factors reduced the inequality estimates to only a small extent. In addition, no statistically significant associations were observed for age groups (adjusted RII 〈= (60) (years) = 0.85, 95% CI 0.44-1.64, adjusted RII〉 60 years = 1.18, 95% CI 0.73-1.90), gender (adjusted RIImale = 1.20, 95% CI 0.68-2.10, adjusted RIIfemale = 0.96, 95% CI 0.56-1.62) or geographical region (adjusted RIINorthern Europe = 1.14, 95% CI 0.81-1.61, adjusted RIIMiddle (Europe) = 1.72, 95% CI 0.93-3.19, adjusted RIISouthern Europe = 0.75, 95% CI 0.32-1.80). Conclusion: Despite large educational inequalities in many risk factors within the EPIC study, we found no evidence for an association between educational level and the risk of developing pancreatic cancer in this European cohort.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20829145
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  • 4
    Keywords: tumor ; BLOOD ; carcinoma ; RISK ; RISKS ; GENE ; GENES ; TUMORS ; DNA ; MECHANISM ; MARKER ; mechanisms ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; VARIANTS ; AGE ; DNA-REPAIR ; REPAIR ; BLADDER-CANCER ; SWEDEN ; GENOTYPES ; SQUAMOUS-CELL CARCINOMA ; adenocarcinoma ; case-control studies ; squamous cell carcinoma ; BODY ; CARDIA ; DNA repair ; DNA-REPAIR GENES ; RELATIVE RISK ; case-control study ; population-based case-control study ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; VARIANT ; XRCC1 POLYMORPHISMS ; LYS751GLN POLYMORPHISM ; XPD ; case control studies ; LUNG-CANCER RISK ; INCREASED RISK ; odds ratio ; population-based ; GASTRIC CARDIA ; CHINESE POPULATION ; VARIANT ALLELES ; GASTROESOPHAGEAL-REFLUX
    Abstract: Mechanisms behind the strong associations of esophageal adenocarcinoma risk with gastroesophageal reflux (GOR) and body mass remain to be defined. In a nationwide population-based case-control study, we examined associations of polymorphisms in the DNA repair genes XPD, XPC, XRCC1 and XRCC3 with risk of esophageal adenocarcinoma, squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC) and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, and paid special attention to possible interactions with symptomatic reflux or body mass. We collected blood samples from 96, 81 and 126 interviewed incident cases of esophageal adenocarcinoma, esophageal SCC and gastric cardia adenocarcinoma, respectively, and 472 randomly selected controls, frequency-matched with regard to age and sex. DNA was extracted and polymorphisms in XPD codon 751 (Lys -〉 Gln), codon 312 (Asp -〉 Asn), C insertion in intron 10 of XPD, XPC codon 939 (Lys -〉 Gln), XRCC1 codon 399 (Arg -〉 Gln) and XRCC3 codon 241 (Thr -〉 Met) were examined using PCR-RFLP. Odds ratios (ORs) derived from multivariate logistic regression with adjustments for potential confounding factors estimated relative risks. XPD codon 751 Lys/Gln and Gln/Gln genotypes, compared with Lys/Lys genotype, were both associated with a more than doubled risk for esophageal adenocarcinoma (OR = 2.4; 95% CI = 1.4-4.4; OR = 2.7, 95% CI = 1.3-5.9). The combined effects of these genotypes and symptomatic GOR or body mass showed borderline significant deviation from additivity. Excess risks for esophageal SCC were also noted for XPD 751Gln variant genotypes. Other studied variants were not found to be related to the three tumors. Our study suggests that XPD 751Gln allele is a potential genetic marker for susceptibility to esophageal adenocarcinoma
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16571649
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; NEW-YORK ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISKS ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; PATTERNS ; DESIGN ; WOMEN ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; POPULATIONS ; MULTIVARIATE ; DIETARY ; FAILURE ; EPIC ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; SMOKERS ; pancreatic cancer ; FOOD ; RELATIVE RISK ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; REGRESSION ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; PATTERN ; CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE ; dietary patterns ; USA ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; MULTIETHNIC COHORT ; WINE ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; LOS-ANGELES
    Abstract: Background: In the Multiethnic Cohort (MEC) study, we showed inverse associations between flavonols and pancreatic cancer risk. Objective: We aimed to define a food pattern associated with intakes of quercetin, kaempferol, and myricetin; to examine the association of that pattern with pancreatic cancer risk; and to investigate the associations in an independent study. Design: Reduced rank regression was applied to dietary data for 183 513 participants in the MEC. A food group pattern was extracted and simplified and applied to dietary data of 424 978 participants in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study. Dietary intake in both studies was assessed by using specially developed questionnaires. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative risks for pancreatic cancer in the MEC (610 cases) and the EPIC (517 cases) studies. Results: The food group pattern consisted mainly of tea, fruit, cabbage, and wine. In the MEC, inverse associations with pancreatic cancer in smokers were observed for the food group pattern [relative risk: 0.59 (95% CI: 0.31, 1.12) when extreme quintiles were compared; P for trend = 0.03]. In the EPIC study, the simplified pattern was not associated with pancreatic cancer risk (P for trend = 0.78). Conclusions: A food pattern associated with the intake of quercetin, kaempferol, and myricetin was associated with lower pancreatic cancer risk in smokers in a US-based population. However, failure to replicate the associations in an independent study weakens the conclusions and raises questions about the utility of food patterns for flavonols across populations. Am J Clin Nutr 2008; 88: 1653-62
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19064528
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; LUNG-CANCER ; COHORT ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; CARCINOGENESIS ; ASSOCIATION ; TRIAL ; prevention ; PATTERNS ; HEALTH ; CIGARETTE-SMOKING ; MEN ; smoking ; RISK FACTOR ; case-control studies ; pancreatic cancer ; NESTED CASE-CONTROL ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; pancreas ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; intensity ; METAANALYSIS ; pooled analysis ; USA ; smoking cessation ; RISK-FACTOR ; pancreatic neoplasms ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; CONSORTIUM ; CONFIDENCE ; MODELING TOTAL EXPOSURE ; SHANGHAI ; tobacco use cessation
    Abstract: Smoking is an established risk factor for pancreatic cancer; however, detailed examination of the association of smoking intensity, smoking duration, and cumulative smoking dose with pancreatic cancer is limited. The authors analyzed pooled data from the international Pancreatic Cancer Cohort Consortium nested case-control study (1,481 cases, 1,539 controls). Odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated by using unconditional logistic regression. Smoking intensity effects were examined with an excess odds ratio model that was linear in pack-years and exponential in cigarettes smoked per day and its square. When compared with never smokers, current smokers had a significantly elevated risk (odds ratio (OR) = 1.77, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.38, 2.26). Risk increased significantly with greater intensity (〉= 30 cigarettes/day: OR = 1.75, 95% CI: 1.27, 2.42), duration (〉= 50 years: OR = 2.13, 95% CI: 1.25, 3.62), and cumulative smoking dose (〉= 40 pack-years: OR = 1.78, 95% CI: 1.35, 2.34). Risk more than 15 years after smoking cessation was similar to that for never smokers. Estimates of excess odds ratio per pack-year declined with increasing intensity, suggesting greater risk for total exposure delivered at lower intensity for longer duration than for higher intensity for shorter duration. This finding and the decline in risk after smoking cessation suggest that smoking has a late-stage effect on pancreatic carcinogenesis
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19561064
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