Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Language
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-07-06
    Description: Background: SNPs in the promoter region of miRNAs have been reported to be associated with cancer prognosis. Our previous study found that miR-146b had a strong correlation with the stage classification of gastric cancer and contributed to tumor progression. The current study was aimed at investigating whether an SNP located in the promoter region of miR-146b could affect the survival rate of gastric cancer. Methods: Using bioinformatics tools, we identified one SNP (rs1536309) that is located in the miR-146b promoter. We genotyped this SNP site to assess its association with gastric cancer prognosis in 940 cases. Results: We found that the dominant model of miR-146b rs1536309 was associated with a higher survival rate of gastric cancer. The association remained significant in the subgroup analysis by age (≤60), sex (male), tumor size (≤5 cm), histologic type (diffuse), lymph node metastasis (N0), distant metastasis (M0), and TNM stage (I/II). Conclusions: Our results suggested that the miR-146b rs1536309 polymorphism may be a potential biomarker for the prognosis of gastric cancer. Impact: This is the first evidence showing that patients carrying the miR-146b-5p rs1536309 CC/CT genotypes exhibited better survival than those carrying the TT genotype, suggesting the protective effect of the C allele in the prognosis of gastric cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 27(7); 822–8. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1055-9965
    Electronic ISSN: 1538-7755
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-12-14
    Keywords: Free Research Articles, BloodWork, Myeloid Neoplasia
    Print ISSN: 0006-4971
    Electronic ISSN: 1528-0020
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-10-11
    Description: Maternal-effect genes are especially critical for early embryonic development after fertilization and until massive activation of the embryonic genome occurs. By applying a tandem mass tag (TMT)-labeled quantitative proteomics combined with RNA sequencing approach, the proteome of the buffalo was quantitatively analyzed during parthenogenesis of mature oocytes and the two-cell stage embryo. Of 1908 quantified proteins, 123 differed significantly. The transcriptome was analyzed eight stages (GV, MII, 2-cell, 4-cell, 8-cell, 16-cell, morula, blastocyst) of Buffalo using the RNA sequencing approach, and a total of 3567 unique genes were identified to be differently expressed between all consecutive stages of pre-implantation development. Validation of proteomics results (TUBB3, CTNNA1, CDH3, MAP2K1), which are involved in tight junction and gap junction, revealing that the maternal expression of the proteins possibly plays a role in the formation of cellular junctions firstly after parthenogenetic activation. Correlation and hierarchical analyses of transcriptional profiles and the expression of NPM2 and NLRP5 mRNA of buffalo in vitro developed oocytes and parthenogenetic embryos indicated that the "maternal-to-zygotic transition" (MZT) process might exist in the model of parthenogenesis, which is similar to a normally fertilized embryo, and may occur between the 8-cell to 16-cell stage. These data provide a rich resource for further studies on maternal proteins and genes and are conducive to improving nuclear transfer technology.
    Print ISSN: 1535-9476
    Electronic ISSN: 1535-9484
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-05-15
    Description: Heng Wang, Zhiqian Qiu, Zehao Xu, Samuel John Chen, Jun Luo, Xiaobo Wang, and Jiong Chen Apical-basal polarity is a hallmark of epithelia and needs to be remodeled when epithelial cells undergo morphogenetic cell movements. Here, we analyze border cells in the Drosophila ovary to address how apical-basal polarity is remodeled and turned into front-back and inside-outside as well as apical-basal polarities, during collective migration. We find that the Crumbs (Crb) complex is required for the generation of the three distinct but interconnected cell polarities of border cells. Specifically, the Crb complex, together with the Par complex and the endocytic recycling machinery, ensures the strict distribution of two distinct populations of aPKC at the inside apical junction and near the outside lateral membrane. Interestingly, aPKC distributed near the outside lateral membrane interacts with Sif and promotes Rac-induced protrusions, whereas alteration of the aPKC distribution pattern changes the pattern of protrusion formation, leading to disruption of all three polarities. Therefore, we demonstrate that aPKC, spatially controlled by the Crb complex, is a key polarity molecule coordinating the generation of three distinct but interconnected cell polarities during collective migration.
    Print ISSN: 0950-1991
    Electronic ISSN: 1477-9129
    Topics: Biology
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2016-03-17
    Description: Mutations disabling the TP53 tumour suppressor gene represent the most frequent events in human cancer and typically occur through a two-hit mechanism involving a missense mutation in one allele and a 'loss of heterozygosity' deletion encompassing the other. While TP53 missense mutations can also contribute gain-of-function activities that impact tumour progression, it remains unclear whether the deletion event, which frequently includes many genes, impacts tumorigenesis beyond TP53 loss alone. Here we show that somatic heterozygous deletion of mouse chromosome 11B3, a 4-megabase region syntenic to human 17p13.1, produces a greater effect on lymphoma and leukaemia development than Trp53 deletion. Mechanistically, the effect of 11B3 loss on tumorigenesis involves co-deleted genes such as Eif5a and Alox15b (also known as Alox8), the suppression of which cooperates with Trp53 loss to produce more aggressive disease. Our results imply that the selective advantage produced by human chromosome 17p deletion reflects the combined impact of TP53 loss and the reduced dosage of linked tumour suppressor genes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4836395/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4836395/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Liu, Yu -- Chen, Chong -- Xu, Zhengmin -- Scuoppo, Claudio -- Rillahan, Cory D -- Gao, Jianjiong -- Spitzer, Barbara -- Bosbach, Benedikt -- Kastenhuber, Edward R -- Baslan, Timour -- Ackermann, Sarah -- Cheng, Lihua -- Wang, Qingguo -- Niu, Ting -- Schultz, Nikolaus -- Levine, Ross L -- Mills, Alea A -- Lowe, Scott W -- P30 CA008748/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016042/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA190261/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Mar 24;531(7595):471-5. doi: 10.1038/nature17157. Epub 2016 Mar 16.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Hematology and Department of Liver Surgery, State Key Laboratory of Biotherapy and Cancer Center, West China Hospital, Sichuan University and National Collaborative Innovation Center, Chengdu 610041, China. ; Department of Cancer Biology and Genetics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Institute for Cancer Genetics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York 10032, USA. ; Kravis Center for Molecular Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Department of Pediatrics, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Human Oncology &Pathogenesis Program and Leukemia Service, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Department of Hematology &Research Laboratory of Hematology, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610041, China. ; Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute, New York, New York 10065, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26982726" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alleles ; Animals ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17/genetics ; Chromosomes, Mammalian/genetics ; Disease Models, Animal ; Disease Progression ; Female ; Genes, p53/*genetics ; Heterozygote ; Humans ; Leukemia, Myeloid, Acute/genetics/pathology ; Lymphoma/genetics/pathology ; Male ; Mice ; Neoplasms/*genetics/*pathology ; Peptide Initiation Factors/genetics/metabolism ; RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Sequence Deletion/*genetics ; Synteny/genetics ; Tumor Suppressor Protein p53/*deficiency
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2013-12-21
    Description: Besides superconductivity, copper-oxide high-temperature superconductors are susceptible to other types of ordering. We used scanning tunneling microscopy and resonant elastic x-ray scattering measurements to establish the formation of charge ordering in the high-temperature superconductor Bi2Sr2CaCu2O(8+x). Depending on the hole concentration, the charge ordering in this system occurs with the same period as those found in Y-based or La-based cuprates and displays the analogous competition with superconductivity. These results indicate the similarity of charge organization competing with superconductivity across different families of cuprates. We observed this charge ordering to leave a distinct electron-hole asymmetric signature (and a broad resonance centered at +20 milli-electron volts) in spectroscopic measurements, indicating that it is likely related to the organization of holes in a doped Mott insulator.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉da Silva Neto, Eduardo H -- Aynajian, Pegor -- Frano, Alex -- Comin, Riccardo -- Schierle, Enrico -- Weschke, Eugen -- Gyenis, Andras -- Wen, Jinsheng -- Schneeloch, John -- Xu, Zhijun -- Ono, Shimpei -- Gu, Genda -- Le Tacon, Mathieu -- Yazdani, Ali -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Jan 24;343(6169):393-6. doi: 10.1126/science.1243479. Epub 2013 Dec 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Joseph Henry Laboratories and Department of Physics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24356110" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-06-27
    Description: Carbon nanotubes have many material properties that make them attractive for applications. In the context of nanoelectronics, interest has focused on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) because slight changes in tube diameter and wrapping angle, defined by the chirality indices (n, m), will shift their electrical conductivity from one characteristic of a metallic state to one characteristic of a semiconducting state, and will also change the bandgap. However, this structure-function relationship can be fully exploited only with structurally pure SWNTs. Solution-based separation methods yield tubes within a narrow structure range, but the ultimate goal of producing just one type of SWNT by controlling its structure during growth has proved to be a considerable challenge over the last two decades. Such efforts aim to optimize the composition or shape of the catalyst particles that are used in the chemical vapour deposition synthesis process to decompose the carbon feedstock and influence SWNT nucleation and growth. This approach resulted in the highest reported proportion, 55 per cent, of single-chirality SWNTs in an as-grown sample. Here we show that SWNTs of a single chirality, (12, 6), can be produced directly with an abundance higher than 92 per cent when using tungsten-based bimetallic alloy nanocrystals as catalysts. These, unlike other catalysts used so far, have such high melting points that they maintain their crystalline structure during the chemical vapour deposition process. This feature seems crucial because experiment and simulation both suggest that the highly selective growth of (12, 6) SWNTs is the result of a good structural match between the carbon atom arrangement around the nanotube circumference and the arrangement of the catalytically active atoms in one of the planes of the nanocrystal catalyst. We anticipate that using high-melting-point alloy nanocrystals with optimized structures as catalysts paves the way for total chirality control in SWNT growth and will thus promote the development of SWNT applications.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yang, Feng -- Wang, Xiao -- Zhang, Daqi -- Yang, Juan -- Luo, Da -- Xu, Ziwei -- Wei, Jiake -- Wang, Jian-Qiang -- Xu, Zhi -- Peng, Fei -- Li, Xuemei -- Li, Ruoming -- Li, Yilun -- Li, Meihui -- Bai, Xuedong -- Ding, Feng -- Li, Yan -- England -- Nature. 2014 Jun 26;510(7506):522-4. doi: 10.1038/nature13434.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Science, Key Laboratory for the Physics and Chemistry of Nanodevices, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China. ; Institute of Textiles and Clothing, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China. ; Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190, China. ; Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201204, China. ; Electron Microscopy Laboratory, Peking University, Beijing 100871, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24965654" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2012-09-21
    Description: The Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas belongs to one of the most species-rich but genomically poorly explored phyla, the Mollusca. Here we report the sequencing and assembly of the oyster genome using short reads and a fosmid-pooling strategy, along with transcriptomes of development and stress response and the proteome of the shell. The oyster genome is highly polymorphic and rich in repetitive sequences, with some transposable elements still actively shaping variation. Transcriptome studies reveal an extensive set of genes responding to environmental stress. The expansion of genes coding for heat shock protein 70 and inhibitors of apoptosis is probably central to the oyster's adaptation to sessile life in the highly stressful intertidal zone. Our analyses also show that shell formation in molluscs is more complex than currently understood and involves extensive participation of cells and their exosomes. The oyster genome sequence fills a void in our understanding of the Lophotrochozoa.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zhang, Guofan -- Fang, Xiaodong -- Guo, Ximing -- Li, Li -- Luo, Ruibang -- Xu, Fei -- Yang, Pengcheng -- Zhang, Linlin -- Wang, Xiaotong -- Qi, Haigang -- Xiong, Zhiqiang -- Que, Huayong -- Xie, Yinlong -- Holland, Peter W H -- Paps, Jordi -- Zhu, Yabing -- Wu, Fucun -- Chen, Yuanxin -- Wang, Jiafeng -- Peng, Chunfang -- Meng, Jie -- Yang, Lan -- Liu, Jun -- Wen, Bo -- Zhang, Na -- Huang, Zhiyong -- Zhu, Qihui -- Feng, Yue -- Mount, Andrew -- Hedgecock, Dennis -- Xu, Zhe -- Liu, Yunjie -- Domazet-Loso, Tomislav -- Du, Yishuai -- Sun, Xiaoqing -- Zhang, Shoudu -- Liu, Binghang -- Cheng, Peizhou -- Jiang, Xuanting -- Li, Juan -- Fan, Dingding -- Wang, Wei -- Fu, Wenjing -- Wang, Tong -- Wang, Bo -- Zhang, Jibiao -- Peng, Zhiyu -- Li, Yingxiang -- Li, Na -- Wang, Jinpeng -- Chen, Maoshan -- He, Yan -- Tan, Fengji -- Song, Xiaorui -- Zheng, Qiumei -- Huang, Ronglian -- Yang, Hailong -- Du, Xuedi -- Chen, Li -- Yang, Mei -- Gaffney, Patrick M -- Wang, Shan -- Luo, Longhai -- She, Zhicai -- Ming, Yao -- Huang, Wen -- Zhang, Shu -- Huang, Baoyu -- Zhang, Yong -- Qu, Tao -- Ni, Peixiang -- Miao, Guoying -- Wang, Junyi -- Wang, Qiang -- Steinberg, Christian E W -- Wang, Haiyan -- Li, Ning -- Qian, Lumin -- Zhang, Guojie -- Li, Yingrui -- Yang, Huanming -- Liu, Xiao -- Wang, Jian -- Yin, Ye -- Wang, Jun -- 268513/European Research Council/International -- England -- Nature. 2012 Oct 4;490(7418):49-54. doi: 10.1038/nature11413. Epub 2012 Sep 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute of Oceanology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Qingdao 266071, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22992520" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptation, Physiological/*genetics ; Animal Shells/chemistry/*growth & development ; Animals ; Apoptosis Regulatory Proteins/genetics ; Crassostrea/*genetics ; DNA Transposable Elements/genetics ; Evolution, Molecular ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental/genetics ; Genes, Homeobox/genetics ; Genome/*genetics ; Genomics ; HSP70 Heat-Shock Proteins/genetics ; Humans ; Larva/genetics/growth & development ; Mass Spectrometry ; Molecular Sequence Annotation ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Polymorphism, Genetic/genetics ; Repetitive Sequences, Nucleic Acid/genetics ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Stress, Physiological/genetics/*physiology ; Transcriptome/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2014-03-29
    Description: We experience the visual world through a series of saccadic eye movements, each one shifting our gaze to bring objects of interest to the fovea for further processing. Although such movements lead to frequent and substantial displacements of the retinal image, these displacements go unnoticed. It is widely assumed that a primary mechanism underlying this apparent stability is an anticipatory shifting of visual receptive fields (RFs) from their presaccadic to their postsaccadic locations before movement onset. Evidence of this predictive 'remapping' of RFs has been particularly apparent within brain structures involved in gaze control. However, critically absent among that evidence are detailed measurements of visual RFs before movement onset. Here we show that during saccade preparation, rather than remap, RFs of neurons in a prefrontal gaze control area massively converge towards the saccadic target. We mapped the visual RFs of prefrontal neurons during stable fixation and immediately before the onset of eye movements, using multi-electrode recordings in monkeys. Following movements from an initial fixation point to a target, RFs remained stationary in retinocentric space. However, in the period immediately before movement onset, RFs shifted by as much as 18 degrees of visual angle, and converged towards the target location. This convergence resulted in a threefold increase in the proportion of RFs responding to stimuli near the target region. In addition, like in human observers, the population of prefrontal neurons grossly mislocalized presaccadic stimuli as being closer to the target. Our results show that RF shifts do not predict the retinal displacements due to saccades, but instead reflect the overriding perception of target space during eye movements.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4064801/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4064801/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Zirnsak, Marc -- Steinmetz, Nicholas A -- Noudoost, Behrad -- Xu, Kitty Z -- Moore, Tirin -- EY014924/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY014924/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- T32 MH020016/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Mar 27;507(7493):504-7. doi: 10.1038/nature13149.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA. ; Department of Neurobiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24670771" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Electrodes ; Fixation, Ocular/physiology ; Humans ; Macaca mulatta ; Male ; Models, Neurological ; Neurons/physiology ; Prefrontal Cortex/cytology/*physiology ; Retina/physiology ; Saccades/*physiology ; Visual Acuity/physiology ; Visual Fields/physiology ; Visual Perception/*physiology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2012-09-29
    Description: Eukaryotic genomes are extensively transcribed, forming both messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs). ncRNAs made by RNA polymerase II often initiate from bidirectional promoters (nucleosome-depleted chromatin) that synthesize mRNA and ncRNA in opposite directions. We demonstrate that, by adopting a gene-loop conformation, actively transcribed mRNA encoding genes restrict divergent transcription of ncRNAs. Because gene-loop formation depends on a protein factor (Ssu72) that coassociates with both the promoter and the terminator, the inactivation of Ssu72 leads to increased synthesis of promoter-associated divergent ncRNAs, referred to as Ssu72-restricted transcripts (SRTs). Similarly, inactivation of individual gene loops by gene mutation enhances SRT synthesis. We demonstrate that gene-loop conformation enforces transcriptional directionality on otherwise bidirectional promoters.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3563069/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3563069/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Tan-Wong, Sue Mei -- Zaugg, Judith B -- Camblong, Jurgi -- Xu, Zhenyu -- Zhang, David W -- Mischo, Hannah E -- Ansari, Aseem Z -- Luscombe, Nicholas M -- Steinmetz, Lars M -- Proudfoot, Nick J -- 091805/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Nov 2;338(6107):671-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1224350. Epub 2012 Sep 27.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Sir William Dunn School of Pathology, University of Oxford, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3RE, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23019609" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Exosome Multienzyme Ribonuclease Complex/metabolism ; *Genes, Fungal ; Genome, Fungal ; Mutation ; Nucleic Acid Conformation ; Phosphoprotein Phosphatases/metabolism ; Promoter Regions, Genetic ; RNA Polymerase II/metabolism ; RNA Stability ; RNA, Fungal/genetics/metabolism ; RNA, Messenger/*genetics/metabolism ; RNA, Untranslated/*genetics/metabolism ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae/*genetics/metabolism ; Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/metabolism ; *Transcription, Genetic ; mRNA Cleavage and Polyadenylation Factors/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...