Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
Collection
Years
  • 1
    ISSN: 1440-1681
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: 1. Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is an independent cardiovascular risk factor. Angiotensin AT1 receptor antagonism has been considered as a specific approach to block the renin–angiotensin system and been demonstrated to be able to prevent or regress LVH by interfering with the remodelling process of the heart.2. Angiotensin AT1 receptor blockade induces a marked increase in angiotensin (Ang) II, which may stimulate the AT2 receptors. Gene expression of AT1 and AT2 receptors increases in a time-dependent manner in cardiac remodelling following myocardial infarction.3. Considerable efforts have been made to clarify the role of AT2 receptors in cardiac hypertrophy and remodelling since the mid-1990s, resulting in controversial reports: the AT2 receptor mediates actions either opposite to or in coordination with those of the AT1 receptor. Moreover, there are many reports of no significant effects mediated by AT2 receptors.4. Based on the studies reviewed in the present article, we assume that the predominant effect of AngII in cardiac hypertrophy and cardiac remodelling is growth promoting and that this effect is mediated mainly via AT1 receptors. The AT2 receptors may affect the hypertrophic process by interacting with other cardiac membrane proteins, enzymes and autacoids. Before coming to a conclusion as to whether AT2 receptor stimulation or antagonism is beneficial to the heart, more studies should be performed in different LVH models, especially long-term treatment protocols in vivo.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    350 Main Street , Malden , MA 02148 , USA. , and 9600 Garsington Road , Oxford OX4 2DQ , England . : Blackwell Science Inc
    Journal of cardiac surgery 17 (2002), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1540-8191
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Myocardial infarction (MI) remains the leading cause of death from cardiovascular diseases over the past decades. Apoptosis is ‘programmed’ cell death which leads to clearance of ‘unwanted’ cells without disruption of tissue structure or function. Recently, we reported that angiotensin receptor subtype AT1 and AT2 mRNA levels were time dependently regulated after MI. AT1 and AT2 receptor mRNA levels markedly increased at 30 min and peaked 24 h post-MI. The time-dependent increase of AT1 and AT2 receptor mRNA is associated with the early remodeling process of the non-infarcted myocardium post MI. There is a further question raised whether the up-regulation of AT2 receptor is linked to apoptosis. Therefore, we investigated the apoptotic development and apoptotic related gene expression after MI at different time points in the current study. MI was induced in Wistar rats by ligation of the left anterior descending coronary artery. Bax gene expression was found to be increased at 12 h after MI and peaked at 24 h (4.3-fold). It declined at 72 h after MI. Fas gene started to over-express at 12 h after MI as well but it reached maximum at 72 h (4.7-fold). Protein levels of Bax and Fas expression were detected in the necrotic area and area at risk (surrounding area) at different time points after MI. Apoptosis was detected in the infarcted areas. No apoptosis was detected in the sham operated rats. In the MI groups, strongest staining of apoptosis was detected in rats 3 days post operation. Weak staining was found 1 day, 7 day post MI. Very fewer apoptotic cells were detected in the rats 2 weeks after MI. Our results demonstrate that apoptotic development after MI is time dependent in the ischemic area and there could be some linkage with the over expression of AT2 receptor post MI.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...