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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-06-15
    Description: We read with interest the recent article by Hoy et al highlighting the risk of accelerated silicosis in workers installing kitchen and bathroom worktops. 1 The Australian paper noted that artificial stone had been available in Australia since the early 2000s, and identified seven cases of silicosis diagnosed between 2011 and 2016. We were particularly interested by this, as the same type of artificial stone worktops have also been commercially available in the UK for approximately the same time period, yet there have been no published cases of accelerated silicosis from our country. To investigate further, we interrogated the Surveillance of Work-related Occupational Respiratory Disease (SWORD) national reporting scheme database and reviewed the 161 reported cases of silicosis between 2000 and 2017. 2 Interestingly, two-thirds of these cases were diagnosed in working age individuals. A review of each individual suspected cause confirmed that there have not been...
    Print ISSN: 1351-0711
    Electronic ISSN: 1470-7926
    Topics: Medicine
    Published by BMJ Publishing Group
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  • 2
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Occupational exposure to extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF) is a suspected risk factor for brain tumors, however the literature is inconsistent. Few studies have assessed whether ELF in different time windows of exposure may be associated with specific histologic types of brain tumors. This study examines the association between ELF and brain tumors in the large-scale INTEROCC study. METHODS: Cases of adult primary glioma and meningioma were recruited in seven countries (Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Israel, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom) between 2000 and 2004. Estimates of mean workday ELF exposure based on a job exposure matrix were assigned. Estimates of cumulative exposure, average exposure, maximum exposure, and exposure duration were calculated for the lifetime, and 1 to 4, 5 to 9, and 10+ years before the diagnosis/reference date. RESULTS: There were 3,761 included brain tumor cases (1,939 glioma and 1,822 meningioma) and 5,404 population controls. There was no association between lifetime cumulative ELF exposure and glioma or meningioma risk. However, there were positive associations between cumulative ELF 1 to 4 years before the diagnosis/reference date and glioma [odds ratio (OR) 〉/= 90th percentile vs. 〈 25th percentile, 1.67; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.36-2.07; PLinear trend 〈 0.0001], and, somewhat weaker associations with meningioma (OR 〉/= 90th percentile vs. 〈 25th percentile, 1.23; 95% CI, 0.97-1.57; PLinear trend = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Results showed positive associations between ELF in the recent past and glioma. IMPACT: Occupational ELF exposure may play a role in the later stages (promotion and progression) of brain tumorigenesis.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24935666
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  • 3
    Keywords: neoplasms ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; ASSOCIATION ; NON-HODGKINS-LYMPHOMA ; MATRIX ; REPRODUCTIVE FACTORS ; SUBTYPES ; CHEMICALS ; EPILYMPH ; PESTICIDES
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Incidence rates of lymphoma are usually higher in men than in women, and oestrogens may protect against lymphoma. METHODS: We evaluated occupational exposure to endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) among 2457 controls and 2178 incident lymphoma cases and subtypes from the European Epilymph study. RESULTS: Over 30 years of exposure to EDCs compared to no exposure was associated with a 24% increased risk of mature B-cell neoplasms (P-trend=0.02). Associations were observed among men, but not women. CONCLUSIONS: Prolonged occupational exposure to endocrine disruptors seems to be moderately associated with some lymphoma subtypes.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25742473
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; COMMON ; INFORMATION ; EXPOSURE ; HISTORY ; POPULATION ; RISK ; RISKS ; meningioma ; TISSUE ; IMPACT ; RISK-FACTORS ; TISSUES ; tumour ; FREQUENCY ; FIELD ; FREQUENCIES ; HEALTH ; DESIGN ; NUMBER ; risk factors ; COUNTRIES ; SWEDEN ; FRANCE ; NETHERLANDS ; case-control studies ; study design ; AUSTRALIA ; FINLAND ; case control study ; case-control study ; RE ; BRAIN-TUMORS ; INCREASE ; GLIOMA ; RECALL ; GLAND ; case control studies ; methods ; CELLULAR-TELEPHONE USE ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCER-RISK ; E ; carcinogenic ; INCREASES ; case control ; acoustic neuroma ; brain tumours ; mobile phone ; MOBILE PHONE USE ; SETUP ; acoustic neurinoma ; benign tumours ; case-control ; CORDLESS TELEPHONES ; FIELDS ; mobile phones ; parotid gland tumours ; SELECTION BIAS
    Abstract: The very rapid worldwide increase in mobile phone use in the last decade has generated considerable interest in the possible health effects of exposure to radio frequency (RF) fields. A multinational case-control study, INTERPHONE, was set-up to investigate whether mobile phone use increases the risk of cancer and, more specifically, whether the RF fields emitted by mobile phones are carcinogenic. The study focused on tumours arising in the tissues most exposed to RF fields from mobile phones: glioma, meningioma, acoustic neurinoma and parotid gland tumours. In addition to a detailed history of mobile phone use, information was collected on a number of known and potential risk factors for these tumours. The study was conducted in 13 countries. Australia, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Israel, Italy, Japan, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, and the UK using a common core protocol. This paper describes the study design and methods and the main characteristics of the study population. INTERPHONE is the largest case-control study to date investigating risks related to mobile phone use and to other potential risk factors for the tumours of interest and includes 2,765 glioma, 2,425 meningioma, 1,121 acoustic neurinoma, 109 malignant parotid gland tumour cases and 7,658 controls. Particular attention was paid to estimating the amount and direction of potential recall and participation biases and their impact on the study results
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17636416
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; CARCINOGENS ; CENTRAL-NERVOUS-SYSTEM ; GLIOMAS ; MATRIX ; CHILDHOOD ; FARMERS ; CHEMICALS ; ADULT BRAIN-TUMORS
    Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To examine associations between occupational exposure to selected organic solvents and meningioma. METHODOLOGY: A multicentre case-control study conducted in seven countries, including 1906 cases and 5565 controls. Occupational exposure to selected classes of organic solvents (aliphatic and alicyclic hydrocarbons, aromatic hydrocarbons, chlorinated hydrocarbons and 'other' organic solvents) or seven specific solvents (benzene, toluene, trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethylene, methylene chloride and gasoline) was assessed using lifetime occupational histories and a modified version of the FINJEM job-exposure matrix (INTEROCC-JEM). Study participants were classified as 'exposed' when they had worked in an occupation for at least 1 year, with a 5-year lag, in which the estimated prevalence of exposure was 25% or greater in the INTEROCC-JEM. Associations between meningioma and each of the solvent exposures were estimated using conditional logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. RESULTS: A total of 6.5% of study participants were ever exposed to 'any' solvent, with a somewhat greater proportion of controls (7%) ever exposed compared with cases (5%), but only one case was ever exposed to any chlorinated hydrocarbon (1,1,1-trichloroethane). No association was observed between any of the organic solvents and meningioma, in either men or women, and no dose-response relationships were observed in internal analyses using either exposure duration or cumulative exposure. DISCUSSION: We found no evidence that occupational exposure to these organic solvents is associated with meningioma.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24474387
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-03-28
    Description: Background Colorectal cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in the world and is twice as common in developed countries when compared with low-income and middle-income countries. Few occupational risk factors for colorectal cancer have been identified. This case–control study aimed to assess the association between colorectal cancer and occupational exposure to selected solvents, combustion products, metals, dusts and other agents. Methods Cases (n=918) were enrolled from the Western Australian Cancer Registry from June 2005 to August 2007. Controls (n=1021) were randomly selected from the Western Australian electoral roll. We collected lifetime occupational history from cases and controls, in addition to their demographic and lifestyle characteristics. We applied the INTEROCC job exposure matrix to convert the occupational history to occupational exposure for 18 selected agents. Three exposure indices were developed: (1) exposed versus non-exposed; (2) lifetime cumulative exposure; and (3) total duration of exposure. The associations between colorectal cancer and the selected agents were estimated using logistic regression models adjusting for sex and age. Results None of the 18 selected agents showed an association with colorectal cancer. No dose–response relationships with lifetime cumulative exposure or duration of exposure were observed. Conclusion There was no evidence to suggest that occupational exposure to 18 selected agents increased the risk of colorectal cancer.
    Print ISSN: 1351-0711
    Electronic ISSN: 1470-7926
    Topics: Medicine
    Published by BMJ Publishing Group
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