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  • 2000-2004  (3)
  • 2002  (3)
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  • 2000-2004  (3)
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  • 1
    ISSN: 1551-2916
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Production Engineering, Mining and Metallurgy, Traffic Engineering, Precision Mechanics , Physics
    Notes: Densification behavior of precursor-derived Si-C-N ceramics by hot isostatic pressing (HIP) has been investigated to obtain dense ceramics derived from polymer precursor. An as-pyrolyzed ceramic monolith, which had a porosity of about 17%, could be deformed up to a strain of 8% in preliminary uniaxial compression tests. The flow stress of the material was much higher than 200 MPa at 1600°C; thus high stress was necessary for densification by HIP. The density of the monolith increased from 1.9 to 2.4 g/cm3 by HIP at 1600°C and 980 MPa. Although the number of pores decreased, large pores were formed in the hot isostatically pressed monolith. On the other hand, denser ceramics, in which pores were not observed by optical microscopy, were obtained by hot isostatically pressing the pyrolyzed powder compact.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1551-2916
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Production Engineering, Mining and Metallurgy, Traffic Engineering, Precision Mechanics , Physics
    Notes: Amorphous Si-B-C-N ceramic powder samples obtained by thermolysis of boron-modified polysilazane, {B[C2H4Si(H)NH]3}n, were isothermally annealed at different temperatures (1400–1800°C) and hold times (3, 10, 30, and 100 h). A qualitative and semiquantitative analysis of the crystallization behavior of the materials was performed using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The phase evolution was additionally followed by 11B and 29Si MAS NMR as well as by FT-IR spectroscopy in transmission and diffuse reflection (DRIFTS) modes. Bulk chemical analyses of selected samples were performed to determine changes in the chemistry/phase composition of the materials. It was observed that silicon carbide is the first phase to nucleate around 1400–1500°C, whereas silicon nitride nucleates at and above 1700°C. Crystallization accelerates with increasing annealing temperature and proceeds with increasing annealing time. Furthermore, the surface area of the powders strongly influences the thermal stability of silicon nitride and thus controls overall chemical and phase composition of the materials on thermal treatment.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1551-2916
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Mechanical Engineering, Materials Science, Production Engineering, Mining and Metallurgy, Traffic Engineering, Precision Mechanics , Physics
    Notes: The chemical stability of an amorphous silicon carbonitride ceramic, having the composition 0.57SiC·0.43Si3N4·0.49C is studied as a function of nitrogen overpressure at 1873 K. The ceramic suffers a weight loss at pN2 〈 3.5 bar (1 bar = 100 kPa), does not show a weight change from 3.5 to 11 bar, and gains weight above 11 bar. The structure of the ceramic changes with pressure: it is crystalline from 1 to 6 bar, amorphous at ∼10 bar, and is crystalline above ∼10 bar. The weight-loss transition, at 3.5 bar, is in excellent agreement with the prediction from thermodynamic analysis when the activities of carbon, SiC, and Si3N4 are set equal to those of the crystalline forms; this implies that the material crystallizes before decomposition. The amorphous to crystalline transition that occurs at ∼10 bar, and which is accompanied by weight gain, is likely to have taken place by a different mechanism. A nucleation and growth reaction with the atmospheric nitrogen is proposed as the likely mechanism. The supersaturation required to nucleate α-Si3N4 crystals is calculated to be 30 kJ/mol.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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