Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
Filter
  • 2015-2019  (104)
  • 2010-2014  (12)
Collection
Language
Years
Year
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-06-02
    Description: Breast cancers detected after a negative breast screening examination and prior to the next screening are referred to as interval cancers. These cancers generally have poor clinical characteristics compared with screen-detected cancers, but associations between interval cancer and genomic cancer characteristics are not well understood. Mammographically screened women diagnosed with primary invasive breast cancer from 1993 to 2013 ( n = 370) were identified by linking the Carolina Breast Cancer Study and the Carolina Mammography Registry. Among women with a registry-identified screening mammogram 0 to 24 months before diagnosis, cancers were classified as screen-detected ( N = 165) or interval-detected ( N = 205). Using logistic regression, we examined the association of mode of detection with cancer characteristics (clinical, IHC, and genomic), overall, and in analyses stratified on mammographic density and race. Interval cancer was associated with large tumors [〉2 cm; OR, 2.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.5–3.7], positive nodal status (OR, 1.8; 95% CI, 1.1–2.8), and triple-negative subtype (OR, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.1–5.5). Interval cancers were more likely to have non-Luminal A subtype (OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.5–5.7), whereas screen-detected cancers tended to be more indolent (96% had low risk of recurrence genomic scores; 71% were PAM50 Luminal A). When stratifying by mammographic density and race, associations between interval detection and poor prognostic features were similar by race and density status. Strong associations between interval cancers and poor-prognosis genomic features (non-Luminal A subtype and high risk of recurrence score) suggest that aggressive tumor biology is an important contributor to interval cancer rates. Cancer Prev Res; 11(6); 327–36. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1940-6207
    Electronic ISSN: 1940-6215
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-07-04
    Description: Membrane receptors regulate numerous intracellular functions. However, the molecular underpinnings remain poorly understood because most receptors initiate multiple signaling pathways through distinct interaction interfaces that are structurally uncharacterized. We present an integrated computational and experimental approach to model and rationally engineer membrane receptor-intracellular protein systems signaling with novel pathway selectivity....
    Print ISSN: 0027-8424
    Electronic ISSN: 1091-6490
    Topics: Biology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-04-14
    Description: Purpose: Because of the uneven geographic distribution and small number of randomized trials available, the value of additional induction chemotherapy (IC) to concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) remains controversial. This study performed an individual patient data (IPD) pooled analysis to better assess the precise role of IC + CCRT in locoregionally advanced NPC. Experimental Design: Four randomized trials in endemic areas were identified, representing 1,193 patients; updated IPD were obtained. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were the primary and secondary endpoints, respectively. Results: Median follow-up was 5.0 years. The HR for PFS was 0.70 [95% confidence interval (CI), 0.56–0.86; P = 0.0009; 9.3% absolute benefit at 5 years] in favor of IC + CCRT versus CCRT alone. IC + CCRT also improved OS (HR = 0.75; 95% CI, 0.57–0.99; P = 0.04) and reduced distant failure (HR = 0.68; 95% CI, 0.51–0.90; P = 0.008). IC + CCRT had a tendency to improve locoregional control compared with CCRT alone (HR = 0.70; 95% CI, 0.48–1.01; P = 0.06). There was no heterogeneity between trials in any analysis. No interactions between patient characteristics and treatment effects on PFS or OS were found. After adding two supplementary trials to provide a more comprehensive overview, the conclusions remained valid and were strengthened. In a supplementary Bayesian network analysis, no statistically significant differences in survival between different IC regimens were detected. Conclusions: This IPD pooled analysis demonstrates the superiority of additional IC over CCRT alone in locoregionally advanced NPC, with the survival benefit mainly associated with improved distant control. Clin Cancer Res; 24(8); 1824–33. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1078-0432
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3265
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    facet.materialart.
    Unknown
    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2018-06-09
    Description: Topological superconductors are an interesting and frontier topic in condensed matter physics. In the superconducting state, an order parameter will be established with the basic or subsidiary symmetry of the crystalline lattice. In doped Bi 2 Se 3 or Bi 2 Te 3 with a basic threefold symmetry, it was predicted, however, that bulk superconductivity with order parameters of twofold symmetry may exist because of the presence of odd parity. We report the proximity effect–induced superconductivity in the Bi 2 Te 3 thin film on top of the iron-based superconductor FeTe 0.55 Se 0.45 . By using the quasiparticle interference technique, we demonstrate clear evidence of twofold symmetry of the superconducting gap. The gap minimum is along one of the main crystalline axes following the so-called 4 y notation. This is also accompanied by the elongated vortex shape mapped out by the density of states within the superconducting gap. Our results provide an easily accessible platform for investigating possible topological superconductivity in Bi 2 Te 3 /FeTe 0.55 Se 0.45 heterostructures.
    Electronic ISSN: 2375-2548
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-08-31
    Description: Quiescence maintenance is an important property of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), whereas the regulatory factors and underlying mechanisms involved in HSC quiescence maintenance are not fully uncovered. Here, we show that steroid receptor coactivator 3 (SRC-3) is highly expressed in HSCs, and SRC-3–deficient HSCs are less quiescent and more proliferative, resulting in increased sensitivity to chemotherapy and irradiation. Moreover, the long-term reconstituting ability of HSCs is markedly impaired in the absence of SRC-3, and SRC-3 knockout (SRC-3 –/– ) mice exhibit a significant disruption of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell homeostasis. Further investigations show that SRC-3 deficiency leads to enhanced mitochondrial metabolism, accompanied by overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in HSCs. Notably, the downstream target genes of peroxisome proliferator–activated receptor-coactivators 1α (PGC-1α) involved in the regulation of mitochondrial metabolism are significantly upregulated in SRC-3–deficient HSCs. Meanwhile, a significant decrease in the expression of histone acetyltransferase GCN5 accompanied by downregulation of PGC-1α acetylation is observed in SRC-3–null HSCs. Conversely, overexpression of GCN5 can inhibit SRC-3 deficiency-induced mitochondrial metabolism enhancement and ROS overproduction, thereby evidently rescuing the impairment of HSCs in SRC-3 –/– mice. Collectively, our findings demonstrate that SRC-3 plays an important role in HSC quiescence maintenance by regulating mitochondrial metabolism.
    Keywords: Hematopoiesis and Stem Cells
    Print ISSN: 0006-4971
    Electronic ISSN: 1528-0020
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-04-25
    Description: Pediatric low-grade gliomas (LGGs) frequently do not engraft in immunocompromised mice, limiting their use as an experimental platform. In contrast, murine Neurofibromatosis-1 ( Nf1 ) optic LGG stem cells (o-GSCs) form glioma-like lesions in wild-type, but not athymic, mice following transplantation. Here, we show that the inability of athymic mice to support o-GSC engraftment results from impaired microglia/macrophage function, including reduced expression of Ccr2 and Ccl5, both of which are required for o-GSC engraftment and Nf1 optic glioma growth. Impaired Ccr2 and Ccl5 expression in athymic microglia/macrophages was restored by T-cell exposure, establishing T-cell–microglia/macrophage interactions as critical stromal determinants that support NF1 LGG growth.
    Print ISSN: 0890-9369
    Topics: Biology
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2016-05-27
    Description: Quiescent galaxies with little or no ongoing star formation dominate the population of galaxies with masses above 2 x 10(10) times that of the Sun; the number of quiescent galaxies has increased by a factor of about 25 over the past ten billion years (refs 1-4). Once star formation has been shut down, perhaps during the quasar phase of rapid accretion onto a supermassive black hole, an unknown mechanism must remove or heat the gas that is subsequently accreted from either stellar mass loss or mergers and that would otherwise cool to form stars. Energy output from a black hole accreting at a low rate has been proposed, but observational evidence for this in the form of expanding hot gas shells is indirect and limited to radio galaxies at the centres of clusters, which are too rare to explain the vast majority of the quiescent population. Here we report bisymmetric emission features co-aligned with strong ionized-gas velocity gradients from which we infer the presence of centrally driven winds in typical quiescent galaxies that host low-luminosity active nuclei. These galaxies are surprisingly common, accounting for as much as ten per cent of the quiescent population with masses around 2 x 10(10) times that of the Sun. In a prototypical example, we calculate that the energy input from the galaxy's low-level active supermassive black hole is capable of driving the observed wind, which contains sufficient mechanical energy to heat ambient, cooler gas (also detected) and thereby suppress star formation.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Cheung, Edmond -- Bundy, Kevin -- Cappellari, Michele -- Peirani, Sebastien -- Rujopakarn, Wiphu -- Westfall, Kyle -- Yan, Renbin -- Bershady, Matthew -- Greene, Jenny E -- Heckman, Timothy M -- Drory, Niv -- Law, David R -- Masters, Karen L -- Thomas, Daniel -- Wake, David A -- Weijmans, Anne-Marie -- Rubin, Kate -- Belfiore, Francesco -- Vulcani, Benedetta -- Chen, Yan-mei -- Zhang, Kai -- Gelfand, Joseph D -- Bizyaev, Dmitry -- Roman-Lopes, A -- Schneider, Donald P -- England -- Nature. 2016 May 25;533(7604):504-8. doi: 10.1038/nature18006.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (World Premier International Research Center Initiative), The University of Tokyo Institutes for Advanced Study, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583, Japan. ; Sub-department of Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH, UK. ; Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris (UMR 7095, CNRS and UPMC), 98 bis Boulevard Arago, F-75014 Paris, France. ; Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Chulalongkorn University, 254 Phayathai Road, Pathumwan, Bangkok 10330, Thailand. ; Institute for Cosmology and Gravitation, University of Portsmouth, Dennis Sciama Building, Burnaby Road, Portsmouth PO1 3FX, UK. ; Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Kentucky, 505 Rose Street, Lexington, Kentucky 40506-0055, USA. ; Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, Wisconsin 53706, USA. ; Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey 08544, USA. ; Center for Astrophysical Sciences, Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA. ; McDonald Observatory, Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station, Austin, Texas 78712-0259, USA. ; Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, Maryland 21218, USA. ; Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA, UK. ; School of Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS, UK. ; Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA. ; Cavendish Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 19 J. J. Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0HE, UK. ; Kavli Institute for Cosmology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0HE, UK. ; Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093, China. ; New York University Abu Dhabi, PO Box 129188, Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates. ; Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, New York University, Meyer Hall of Physics, 4 Washington Place, New York, New York 10003, USA. ; Apache Point Observatory and New Mexico State University, PO Box 59, Sunspot, New Mexico 88349-0059, USA. ; Sternberg Astronomical Institute, Moscow State University, Moscow, Russia. ; Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de La Serena, Cisternas 1200, La Serena, Chile. ; Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA. ; Institute for Gravitation and the Cosmos, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27225122" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2014-05-03
    Description: Hybrid metal nanoparticles can allow separate reaction steps to occur in close proximity at different metal sites and accelerate catalysis. We synthesized iron-nickel hydroxide-platinum (transition metal-OH-Pt) nanoparticles with diameters below 5 nanometers and showed that they are highly efficient for carbon monoxide (CO) oxidation catalysis at room temperature. We characterized the composition and structure of the transition metal-OH-Pt interface and showed that Ni(2+) plays a key role in stabilizing the interface against dehydration. Density functional theory and isotope-labeling experiments revealed that the OH groups at the Fe(3+)-OH-Pt interfaces readily react with CO adsorbed nearby to directly yield carbon dioxide (CO2) and simultaneously produce coordinatively unsaturated Fe sites for O2 activation. The oxide-supported PtFeNi nanocatalyst rapidly and fully removed CO from humid air without decay in activity for 1 month.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Chen, Guangxu -- Zhao, Yun -- Fu, Gang -- Duchesne, Paul N -- Gu, Lin -- Zheng, Yanping -- Weng, Xuefei -- Chen, Mingshu -- Zhang, Peng -- Pao, Chih-Wen -- Lee, Jyh-Fu -- Zheng, Nanfeng -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 May 2;344(6183):495-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1252553.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉State Key Laboratory for Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, National Engineering Laboratory for Green Chemical Productions of Alcohols, Ethers, and Esters, and Department of Chemistry, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24786074" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2018-11-02
    Description: Purpose: To develop a synergistic combination therapy for advanced pancreatic cancer, using local phototherapy and immunotherapy, and to determine the efficacy and mechanism of the novel combination therapy using a highly metastatic pancreatic tumor model in mice. Experimental Design: Mice bearing Panc02-H7 pancreatic tumors (both subcutaneous and orthotopic) were treated with noninvasive or interventional photothermal therapy, followed by local application of an immunoadjuvant. Tumor growth and animal survival were assessed. Immune cell populations within spleen and tumors were evaluated by FACS and IHC, and cytokine levels were determined by ELISA. Results: Up to 75% of mice bearing subcutaneous tumors treated with combination therapy had complete tumor regression. Local photothermal therapy exposed/released damage-associated molecular patterns, which initiated an immunogenic tumor cell death, resulting in infiltration of antigen-presenting cells and Th1 immunity. Concomitant application of immunoadjuvant amplified Th1 immunity, especially the tumor-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte response, with increased quantity and quality of T cells. Combination therapy also induced tumor-specific immune memory, as demonstrated by resistance to tumor rechallenge and production of memory T cells. For the treatment of orthotopic tumor, the combination therapy significantly reduced the primary tumors and metastases, and prolonged the animal survival time. Conclusions: This study indicated that combination of local phototherapy and immunotherapy induced a systemic immunity against established tumors and metastases in an aggressive, preclinical pancreatic tumor model, leading to a potential clinical method for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Clin Cancer Res; 24(21); 5335–46. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1078-0432
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3265
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2018-11-02
    Description: Oncogenic tyrosine kinase fusions involving the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) are detected in numerous tumor types. Although more than 30 distinct 5' fusion partner genes have been reported, treatment of ALK -rearranged cancers is decided without regard to which 5' partner is present. There is little data addressing how the 5' partner affects the biology of the fusion or responsiveness to ALK tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI). On the basis of the hypothesis that the 5' partner influences the intrinsic properties of the fusion protein, cellular functions that impact oncogenic potential, and sensitivity to ALK TKIs, clonal 3T3 cell lines stably expressing seven different ALK fusion variants were generated. Biochemical and cellular assays were used to assess the efficacy of various ALK TKIs in clinical use, transformative phenotypes, and biochemical properties of each fusion. All seven ALK fusions induced focus formation and colonies in soft agar, albeit to varying degrees. IC 50 s were calculated for different ALK TKIs (crizotinib, ensartinib, alectinib, lorlatinib) and consistent differences (5–10 fold) in drug sensitivity were noted across the seven ALK fusions tested. Finally, biochemical analyses revealed negative correlations between kinase activity and protein stability. These results demonstrate that the 5' fusion partner plays an important biological role that affects sensitivity to ALK TKIs. Implications: This study shows that the 5' ALK fusion partner influences ALK TKI drug sensitivity. As many other kinase fusions are found in numerous cancers, often with overlapping fusion partners, these studies have ramifications for other kinase-driven malignancies. Mol Cancer Res; 16(11); 1724–36. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1541-7786
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3125
    Topics: Medicine
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...