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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-03-06
    Description: Peptide receptor radionuclide therapy (PRRT) may induce long-term toxicity to the bone marrow (BM). The aim of this study was to analyze persistent hematologic dysfunction (PHD) after PRRT with 177 Lu-DOTATATE in patients with gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP NETs). Methods: The incidence and course of PHD were analyzed in 274 GEP NET patients from a group of 367 patients with somatostatin receptor–positive tumors. PHD was defined as diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN), MDS/MPN, or otherwise unexplained cytopenia (for 〉6 mo). Using data from The Netherlands Cancer Registry, the expected number of hematopoietic neoplasms (MDS, AML, MPN, and MDS/MPN) was calculated and adjusted for sex, age, and follow-up period. The following risk factors were assessed: sex, age over 70 y, bone metastasis, prior chemotherapy, prior external-beam radiotherapy, uptake on the [ 111 In-DTPA 0 ]octreotide scan, tumor load, grade 3–4 hematologic toxicity during treatment, estimated absorbed BM dose, elevated plasma chromogranin A level, baseline blood counts, and renal function. Results: Eleven (4%) of the 274 patients had PHD after treatment with 177 Lu-DOTATATE: 8 patients (2.9%) developed a hematopoietic neoplasm (4 MDS, 1 AML, 1 MPN, and 2 MDS/MPN) and 3 patients (1.1%) developed BM failure characterized by cytopenia and BM aplasia. The median latency period at diagnosis (or first suspicion of a PHD) was 41 mo (range, 15–84 mo). The expected number of hematopoietic neoplasms based on The Netherlands Cancer Registry data was 3.0, resulting in a relative risk of 2.7 (95% confidence interval, 0.7–10.0). No risk factors for PHD could be identified for the GEP NET patients, not even bone metastasis or estimated BM dose. Seven patients with PHD developed anemia in combination with a rise in mean corpuscular volume. Conclusion: The prevalence of PHD after PRRT with 177 Lu-DOTATATE was 4% in our patient population. The median time at which PHD developed was 41 mo after the first PRRT cycle. The relative risk for developing a hematopoietic neoplasm was 2.7. No risk factors were found for the development of PHD in GEP NET patients.
    Print ISSN: 0022-3123
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-11-15
    Description: Oral administration of therapeutic peptides is hindered by poor absorption across the gastrointestinal barrier and extensive degradation by proteolytic enzymes. Here, we investigated the absorption of orally delivered semaglutide, a glucagon-like peptide-1 analog, coformulated with the absorption enhancer sodium N -[8-(2-hydroxybenzoyl) aminocaprylate] (SNAC) in a tablet. In contrast to intestinal absorption usually seen with small molecules, clinical and preclinical dog studies revealed that absorption of semaglutide takes place in the stomach, is confined to an area in close proximity to the tablet surface, and requires coformulation with SNAC. SNAC protects against enzymatic degradation via local buffering actions and only transiently enhances absorption. The mechanism of absorption is shown to be compound specific, transcellular, and without any evidence of effect on tight junctions. These data have implications for understanding how highly efficacious and specific therapeutic peptides could be transformed from injectable to tablet-based oral therapies.
    Print ISSN: 1946-6234
    Electronic ISSN: 1946-6242
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-12-04
    Description: The tendency of mitochondria to undergo or resist BCL2-controlled apoptosis (so-called mitochondrial priming) is a powerful predictor of response to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Fully exploiting this finding will require unraveling the molecular genetics underlying phenotypic variability in mitochondrial priming. Here, we report that mitochondrial apoptosis resistance in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is mediated by inactivation of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). In T-ALL clinical specimens, loss-of-function mutations of PRC2 core components ( EZH2 , EED , or SUZ12 ) were associated with mitochondrial apoptosis resistance. In T-ALL cells, PRC2 depletion induced resistance to apoptosis induction by multiple chemotherapeutics with distinct mechanisms of action. PRC2 loss induced apoptosis resistance via transcriptional up-regulation of the LIM domain transcription factor CRIP2 and downstream up-regulation of the mitochondrial chaperone TRAP1 . These findings demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial apoptotic priming as a prognostic factor in T-ALL and implicate mitochondrial chaperone function as a molecular determinant of chemotherapy response.
    Keywords: Leukemia & Lymphoma
    Print ISSN: 0022-1007
    Electronic ISSN: 1540-9538
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2012-11-16
    Description: For 10,000 years pigs and humans have shared a close and complex relationship. From domestication to modern breeding practices, humans have shaped the genomes of domestic pigs. Here we present the assembly and analysis of the genome sequence of a female domestic Duroc pig (Sus scrofa) and a comparison with the genomes of wild and domestic pigs from Europe and Asia. Wild pigs emerged in South East Asia and subsequently spread across Eurasia. Our results reveal a deep phylogenetic split between European and Asian wild boars approximately 1 million years ago, and a selective sweep analysis indicates selection on genes involved in RNA processing and regulation. Genes associated with immune response and olfaction exhibit fast evolution. Pigs have the largest repertoire of functional olfactory receptor genes, reflecting the importance of smell in this scavenging animal. The pig genome sequence provides an important resource for further improvements of this important livestock species, and our identification of many putative disease-causing variants extends the potential of the pig as a biomedical model.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3566564/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3566564/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Groenen, Martien A M -- Archibald, Alan L -- Uenishi, Hirohide -- Tuggle, Christopher K -- Takeuchi, Yasuhiro -- Rothschild, Max F -- Rogel-Gaillard, Claire -- Park, Chankyu -- Milan, Denis -- Megens, Hendrik-Jan -- Li, Shengting -- Larkin, Denis M -- Kim, Heebal -- Frantz, Laurent A F -- Caccamo, Mario -- Ahn, Hyeonju -- Aken, Bronwen L -- Anselmo, Anna -- Anthon, Christian -- Auvil, Loretta -- Badaoui, Bouabid -- Beattie, Craig W -- Bendixen, Christian -- Berman, Daniel -- Blecha, Frank -- Blomberg, Jonas -- Bolund, Lars -- Bosse, Mirte -- Botti, Sara -- Bujie, Zhan -- Bystrom, Megan -- Capitanu, Boris -- Carvalho-Silva, Denise -- Chardon, Patrick -- Chen, Celine -- Cheng, Ryan -- Choi, Sang-Haeng -- Chow, William -- Clark, Richard C -- Clee, Christopher -- Crooijmans, Richard P M A -- Dawson, Harry D -- Dehais, Patrice -- De Sapio, Fioravante -- Dibbits, Bert -- Drou, Nizar -- Du, Zhi-Qiang -- Eversole, Kellye -- Fadista, Joao -- Fairley, Susan -- Faraut, Thomas -- Faulkner, Geoffrey J -- Fowler, Katie E -- Fredholm, Merete -- Fritz, Eric -- Gilbert, James G R -- Giuffra, Elisabetta -- Gorodkin, Jan -- Griffin, Darren K -- Harrow, Jennifer L -- Hayward, Alexander -- Howe, Kerstin -- Hu, Zhi-Liang -- Humphray, Sean J -- Hunt, Toby -- Hornshoj, Henrik -- Jeon, Jin-Tae -- Jern, Patric -- Jones, Matthew -- Jurka, Jerzy -- Kanamori, Hiroyuki -- Kapetanovic, Ronan -- Kim, Jaebum -- Kim, Jae-Hwan -- Kim, Kyu-Won -- Kim, Tae-Hun -- Larson, Greger -- Lee, Kyooyeol -- Lee, Kyung-Tai -- Leggett, Richard -- Lewin, Harris A -- Li, Yingrui -- Liu, Wansheng -- Loveland, Jane E -- Lu, Yao -- Lunney, Joan K -- Ma, Jian -- Madsen, Ole -- Mann, Katherine -- Matthews, Lucy -- McLaren, Stuart -- Morozumi, Takeya -- Murtaugh, Michael P -- Narayan, Jitendra -- Nguyen, Dinh Truong -- Ni, Peixiang -- Oh, Song-Jung -- Onteru, Suneel -- Panitz, Frank -- Park, Eung-Woo -- Park, Hong-Seog -- Pascal, Geraldine -- Paudel, Yogesh -- Perez-Enciso, Miguel -- Ramirez-Gonzalez, Ricardo -- Reecy, James M -- Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra -- Rohrer, Gary A -- Rund, Lauretta -- Sang, Yongming -- Schachtschneider, Kyle -- Schraiber, Joshua G -- Schwartz, John -- Scobie, Linda -- Scott, Carol -- Searle, Stephen -- Servin, Bertrand -- Southey, Bruce R -- Sperber, Goran -- Stadler, Peter -- Sweedler, Jonathan V -- Tafer, Hakim -- Thomsen, Bo -- Wali, Rashmi -- Wang, Jian -- Wang, Jun -- White, Simon -- Xu, Xun -- Yerle, Martine -- Zhang, Guojie -- Zhang, Jianguo -- Zhang, Jie -- Zhao, Shuhong -- Rogers, Jane -- Churcher, Carol -- Schook, Lawrence B -- 095908/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 249894/European Research Council/International -- 5 P41 LM006252/LM/NLM NIH HHS/ -- 5 P41LM006252/LM/NLM NIH HHS/ -- BB/E010520/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/E010520/2/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/E010768/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/E011640/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/G004013/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/H005935/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/I025328/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- G0900950/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- P20-RR017686/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- P30 DA018310/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R13 RR020283A/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- R13 RR032267A/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- R21 DA027548/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R21 HG006464/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI083196/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Nov 15;491(7424):393-8. doi: 10.1038/nature11622.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Animal Breeding and Genomics Centre, Wageningen University, De Elst 1, 6708 WD, Wageningen, The Netherlands. martien.groenen@wur.nl〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23151582" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Demography ; Genome/*genetics ; Models, Animal ; Molecular Sequence Data ; *Phylogeny ; Population Dynamics ; Sus scrofa/*classification/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2012-10-06
    Description: Some planetary systems harbour debris disks containing planetesimals such as asteroids and comets. Collisions between such bodies produce small dust particles, the spectral features of which reveal their composition and, hence, that of their parent bodies. A measurement of the composition of olivine crystals (Mg(2-2x)Fe(2x)SiO(4)) has been done for the protoplanetary disk HD 100546 (refs 3, 4) and for olivine crystals in the warm inner parts of planetary systems. The latter compares well with the iron-rich olivine in asteroids (x approximately 0.29). In the cold outskirts of the beta Pictoris system, an analogue to the young Solar System, olivine crystals were detected but their composition remained undetermined, leaving unknown how the composition of the bulk of Solar System cometary olivine grains compares with that of extrasolar comets. Here we report the detection of the 69-micrometre-wavelength band of olivine crystals in the spectrum of beta Pictoris. Because the disk is optically thin, we can associate the crystals with an extrasolar proto-Kuiper belt a distance of 15-45 astronomical units from the star (one astronomical unit is the Sun-Earth distance), determine their magnesium-rich composition (x = 0.01 +/- 0.001) and show that they make up 3.6 +/- 1.0 per cent of the total dust mass. These values are strikingly similar to those for the dust emitted by the most primitive comets in the Solar System, even though beta Pictoris is more massive and more luminous and has a different planetary system architecture.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉de Vries, B L -- Acke, B -- Blommaert, J A D L -- Waelkens, C -- Waters, L B F M -- Vandenbussche, B -- Min, M -- Olofsson, G -- Dominik, C -- Decin, L -- Barlow, M J -- Brandeker, A -- Di Francesco, J -- Glauser, A M -- Greaves, J -- Harvey, P M -- Holland, W S -- Ivison, R J -- Liseau, R -- Pantin, E E -- Pilbratt, G L -- Royer, P -- Sibthorpe, B -- England -- Nature. 2012 Oct 4;490(7418):74-6. doi: 10.1038/nature11469.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Leuven, Belgium. bldevries.science@gmail.com〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23038467" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-06-29
    Description: The ultrafast laser excitation of matters leads to nonequilibrium states with complex solid-liquid phase-transition dynamics. We used electron diffraction at mega–electron volt energies to visualize the ultrafast melting of gold on the atomic scale length. For energy densities approaching the irreversible melting regime, we first observed heterogeneous melting on time scales of 100 to 1000 picoseconds, transitioning to homogeneous melting that occurs catastrophically within 10 to 20 picoseconds at higher energy densities. We showed evidence for the heterogeneous coexistence of solid and liquid. We determined the ion and electron temperature evolution and found superheated conditions. Our results constrain the electron-ion coupling rate, determine the Debye temperature, and reveal the melting sensitivity to nucleation seeds.
    Keywords: Physics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Unknown
    London : Academic Press
    Call number: 09-MA:473
    Keywords: Stochastic processes ; Mathematical Statistics ; Prozess / stochastisch
    Notes: Includes index.
    Pages: xiv, 435 p. : ill.
    ISBN: 0120802503
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  • 8
    ISSN: 1573-8485
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Mathematics
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2018-06-08
    Description: A high concentration of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Although LDL-C levels vary among humans and are heritable, the genetic factors affecting LDL-C are not fully characterized. We identified a rare frameshift variant in the LIMA1 (also known as EPLIN or SREBP3 ) gene from a Chinese family of Kazakh ethnicity with inherited low LDL-C and reduced cholesterol absorption. In a mouse model, LIMA1 was mainly expressed in the small intestine and localized on the brush border membrane. LIMA1 bridged NPC1L1, an essential protein for cholesterol absorption, to a transportation complex containing myosin Vb and facilitated cholesterol uptake. Similar to the human phenotype, Lima1 -deficient mice displayed reduced cholesterol absorption and were resistant to diet-induced hypercholesterolemia. Through our study of both mice and humans, we identify LIMA1 as a key protein regulating intestinal cholesterol absorption.
    Keywords: Genetics, Medicine, Diseases
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2016-03-17
    Description: CD8(+) T cells have a central role in antitumour immunity, but their activity is suppressed in the tumour microenvironment. Reactivating the cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells is of great clinical interest in cancer immunotherapy. Here we report a new mechanism by which the antitumour response of mouse CD8(+) T cells can be potentiated by modulating cholesterol metabolism. Inhibiting cholesterol esterification in T cells by genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of ACAT1, a key cholesterol esterification enzyme, led to potentiated effector function and enhanced proliferation of CD8(+) but not CD4(+) T cells. This is due to the increase in the plasma membrane cholesterol level of CD8(+) T cells, which causes enhanced T-cell receptor clustering and signalling as well as more efficient formation of the immunological synapse. ACAT1-deficient CD8(+) T cells were better than wild-type CD8(+) T cells at controlling melanoma growth and metastasis in mice. We used the ACAT inhibitor avasimibe, which was previously tested in clinical trials for treating atherosclerosis and showed a good human safety profile, to treat melanoma in mice and observed a good antitumour effect. A combined therapy of avasimibe plus an anti-PD-1 antibody showed better efficacy than monotherapies in controlling tumour progression. ACAT1, an established target for atherosclerosis, is therefore also a potential target for cancer immunotherapy.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4851431/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4851431/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yang, Wei -- Bai, Yibing -- Xiong, Ying -- Zhang, Jin -- Chen, Shuokai -- Zheng, Xiaojun -- Meng, Xiangbo -- Li, Lunyi -- Wang, Jing -- Xu, Chenguang -- Yan, Chengsong -- Wang, Lijuan -- Chang, Catharine C Y -- Chang, Ta-Yuan -- Zhang, Ti -- Zhou, Penghui -- Song, Bao-Liang -- Liu, Wanli -- Sun, Shao-cong -- Liu, Xiaolong -- Li, Bo-liang -- Xu, Chenqi -- HL 60306./HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL060306/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Mar 31;531(7596):651-5. doi: 10.1038/nature17412. Epub 2016 Mar 16.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉State Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology, National Center for Protein Science Shanghai, Shanghai Science Research Center, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China. ; State Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology, CAS Center for Excellence in Molecular Cell Science, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China. ; Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China. ; MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Science, School of Life Sciences, Collaborative Innovation Center for Infectious Diseases, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; Department of Biochemistry, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Haven 03755, USA. ; Rheumatology and Immunology Department of ChangZheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China. ; Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060, China. ; College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430072, China. ; Department of Immunology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77054, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, CAS Center for Excellence in Molecular Cell Science, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China. ; School of Life Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, 100 Haike Road, Shanghai 201210, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26982734" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Acetates/*pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Acetyl-CoA C-Acetyltransferase/antagonists & ; inhibitors/deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; Animals ; Atherosclerosis/drug therapy ; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/*drug effects/*immunology/metabolism ; Cell Membrane/drug effects/metabolism ; Cholesterol/*metabolism ; Esterification/drug effects ; Female ; Immunological Synapses/drug effects/immunology/metabolism ; Immunotherapy/*methods ; Male ; Melanoma/*drug therapy/*immunology/metabolism/pathology ; Mice ; Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/antagonists & inhibitors/immunology ; Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/immunology/metabolism ; Signal Transduction/drug effects ; Sulfonic Acids/*pharmacology/therapeutic use
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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