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  • Nature Publishing Group (NPG)  (6)
  • The American Society for Microbiology (ASM)
  • 2010-2014  (6)
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2013-09-13
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wallace, Helen -- England -- Nature. 2013 Sep 12;501(7466):167. doi: 10.1038/501167c.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24025831" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Access to Information ; Humans ; *Information Dissemination
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-08-11
    Description: Biological dinitrogen fixation provides the largest input of nitrogen to the oceans, therefore exerting important control on the ocean's nitrogen inventory and primary productivity. Nitrogen-isotope data from ocean sediments suggest that the marine-nitrogen inventory has been balanced for the past 3,000 years (ref. 4). Producing a balanced marine-nitrogen budget based on direct measurements has proved difficult, however, with nitrogen loss exceeding the gain from dinitrogen fixation by approximately 200 Tg N yr-1 (refs 5, 6). Here we present data from the Atlantic Ocean and show that the most widely used method of measuring oceanic N2-fixation rates underestimates the contribution of N2-fixing microorganisms (diazotrophs) relative to a newly developed method. Using molecular techniques to quantify the abundance of specific clades of diazotrophs in parallel with rates of 15N2 incorporation into particulate organic matter, we suggest that the difference between N2-fixation rates measured with the established method and those measured with the new method can be related to the composition of the diazotrophic community. Our data show that in areas dominated by Trichodesmium, the established method underestimates N2-fixation rates by an average of 62%. We also find that the newly developed method yields N2-fixation rates more than six times higher than those from the established method when unicellular, symbiotic cyanobacteria and gamma-proteobacteria dominate the diazotrophic community. On the basis of average areal rates measured over the Atlantic Ocean, we calculated basin-wide N2-fixation rates of 14 +/- 1 Tg N yr-1 and 24 +/-1 Tg N yr-1 for the established and new methods, respectively. If our findings can be extrapolated to other ocean basins, this suggests that the global marine N2-fixation rate derived from direct measurements may increase from 103 +/- 8 Tg N yr-1 to 177 +/- 8 Tg N yr-1, and that the contribution of N2 fixers other than Trichodesmium is much more significant than was previously thought.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Grosskopf, Tobias -- Mohr, Wiebke -- Baustian, Tina -- Schunck, Harald -- Gill, Diana -- Kuypers, Marcel M M -- Lavik, Gaute -- Schmitz, Ruth A -- Wallace, Douglas W R -- LaRoche, Julie -- England -- Nature. 2012 Aug 16;488(7411):361-4. doi: 10.1038/nature11338.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research Kiel, Kiel, Germany. tgrosskopf@geomar.de〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22878720" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aquatic Organisms/*metabolism ; Atlantic Ocean ; Cyanobacteria/genetics/metabolism ; Diatoms/metabolism ; Kinetics ; Nitrogen/*metabolism ; Nitrogen Fixation/*physiology ; Oxidoreductases/genetics ; Proteobacteria/genetics/metabolism ; Seawater/chemistry ; Taq Polymerase/metabolism ; Temperature ; Tropical Climate
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2013-05-28
    Description: Fusing left and right eye images into a single view is dependent on precise ocular alignment, which relies on coordinated eye movements. During movements of the head this alignment is maintained by numerous reflexes. Although rodents share with other mammals the key components of eye movement control, the coordination of eye movements in freely moving rodents is unknown. Here we show that movements of the two eyes in freely moving rats differ fundamentally from the precisely controlled eye movements used by other mammals to maintain continuous binocular fusion. The observed eye movements serve to keep the visual fields of the two eyes continuously overlapping above the animal during free movement, but not continuously aligned. Overhead visual stimuli presented to rats freely exploring an open arena evoke an immediate shelter-seeking behaviour, but are ineffective when presented beside the arena. We suggest that continuously overlapping visual fields overhead would be of evolutionary benefit for predator detection by minimizing blind spots.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wallace, Damian J -- Greenberg, David S -- Sawinski, Juergen -- Rulla, Stefanie -- Notaro, Giuseppe -- Kerr, Jason N D -- England -- Nature. 2013 Jun 6;498(7452):65-9. doi: 10.1038/nature12153. Epub 2013 May 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Network Imaging Group, Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics, Spemannstrasse 41, 72076 Tubingen, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23708965" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Escape Reaction/physiology ; Exploratory Behavior/physiology ; Eye Movements/physiology ; Head/physiology ; Models, Biological ; Movement/physiology ; Optic Disk/physiology ; Predatory Behavior ; Rats ; Retina/physiology ; Vision, Binocular/*physiology ; Visual Fields/*physiology
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2014-05-09
    Description: Rapid Arctic warming and sea-ice reduction in the Arctic Ocean are widely attributed to anthropogenic climate change. The Arctic warming exceeds the global average warming because of feedbacks that include sea-ice reduction and other dynamical and radiative feedbacks. We find that the most prominent annual mean surface and tropospheric warming in the Arctic since 1979 has occurred in northeastern Canada and Greenland. In this region, much of the year-to-year temperature variability is associated with the leading mode of large-scale circulation variability in the North Atlantic, namely, the North Atlantic Oscillation. Here we show that the recent warming in this region is strongly associated with a negative trend in the North Atlantic Oscillation, which is a response to anomalous Rossby wave-train activity originating in the tropical Pacific. Atmospheric model experiments forced by prescribed tropical sea surface temperatures simulate the observed circulation changes and associated tropospheric and surface warming over northeastern Canada and Greenland. Experiments from the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (ref. 16) models with prescribed anthropogenic forcing show no similar circulation changes related to the North Atlantic Oscillation or associated tropospheric warming. This suggests that a substantial portion of recent warming in the northeastern Canada and Greenland sector of the Arctic arises from unforced natural variability.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ding, Qinghua -- Wallace, John M -- Battisti, David S -- Steig, Eric J -- Gallant, Ailie J E -- Kim, Hyung-Jin -- Geng, Lei -- England -- Nature. 2014 May 8;509(7499):209-12. doi: 10.1038/nature13260.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Earth and Space Sciences and Quaternary Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; Department of Atmospheric Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; School of Geography and Environmental Science, Monash University, Victoria 3800, Australia. ; Climate Research Department, APEC Climate Center, 12 Centum 7-ro, Haeundae-gu, Busan 612-020, South Korea.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24805345" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Air ; Arctic Regions ; Canada ; *Feedback ; Global Warming/*statistics & numerical data ; Greenland ; Hot Temperature ; Human Activities ; Ice Cover ; Models, Theoretical ; Pacific Ocean ; Seawater ; *Tropical Climate
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2012-07-17
    Description: Alterations in intestinal microbiota composition are associated with several chronic conditions, including obesity and inflammatory diseases. The microbiota of older people displays greater inter-individual variation than that of younger adults. Here we show that the faecal microbiota composition from 178 elderly subjects formed groups, correlating with residence location in the community, day-hospital, rehabilitation or in long-term residential care. However, clustering of subjects by diet separated them by the same residence location and microbiota groupings. The separation of microbiota composition significantly correlated with measures of frailty, co-morbidity, nutritional status, markers of inflammation and with metabolites in faecal water. The individual microbiota of people in long-stay care was significantly less diverse than that of community dwellers. Loss of community-associated microbiota correlated with increased frailty. Collectively, the data support a relationship between diet, microbiota and health status, and indicate a role for diet-driven microbiota alterations in varying rates of health decline upon ageing.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Claesson, Marcus J -- Jeffery, Ian B -- Conde, Susana -- Power, Susan E -- O'Connor, Eibhlis M -- Cusack, Siobhan -- Harris, Hugh M B -- Coakley, Mairead -- Lakshminarayanan, Bhuvaneswari -- O'Sullivan, Orla -- Fitzgerald, Gerald F -- Deane, Jennifer -- O'Connor, Michael -- Harnedy, Norma -- O'Connor, Kieran -- O'Mahony, Denis -- van Sinderen, Douwe -- Wallace, Martina -- Brennan, Lorraine -- Stanton, Catherine -- Marchesi, Julian R -- Fitzgerald, Anthony P -- Shanahan, Fergus -- Hill, Colin -- Ross, R Paul -- O'Toole, Paul W -- England -- Nature. 2012 Aug 9;488(7410):178-84. doi: 10.1038/nature11319.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Microbiology, University College Cork, Ireland.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22797518" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Aged ; Aged, 80 and over ; Aging/*physiology ; Cohort Studies ; Diet/*statistics & numerical data ; Diet Surveys ; Feces/*microbiology ; Fruit ; Geriatric Assessment ; Health ; *Health Status ; Health Surveys ; Homes for the Aged ; Hospitals, Community ; Humans ; Intestines/*microbiology ; Meat ; Metagenome/*physiology ; Rehabilitation Centers ; Surveys and Questionnaires ; Vegetables
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    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2013-04-12
    Description: Obtaining high-resolution information from a complex system, while maintaining the global perspective needed to understand system function, represents a key challenge in biology. Here we address this challenge with a method (termed CLARITY) for the transformation of intact tissue into a nanoporous hydrogel-hybridized form (crosslinked to a three-dimensional network of hydrophilic polymers) that is fully assembled but optically transparent and macromolecule-permeable. Using mouse brains, we show intact-tissue imaging of long-range projections, local circuit wiring, cellular relationships, subcellular structures, protein complexes, nucleic acids and neurotransmitters. CLARITY also enables intact-tissue in situ hybridization, immunohistochemistry with multiple rounds of staining and de-staining in non-sectioned tissue, and antibody labelling throughout the intact adult mouse brain. Finally, we show that CLARITY enables fine structural analysis of clinical samples, including non-sectioned human tissue from a neuropsychiatric-disease setting, establishing a path for the transmutation of human tissue into a stable, intact and accessible form suitable for probing structural and molecular underpinnings of physiological function and disease.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4092167/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4092167/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Chung, Kwanghun -- Wallace, Jenelle -- Kim, Sung-Yon -- Kalyanasundaram, Sandhiya -- Andalman, Aaron S -- Davidson, Thomas J -- Mirzabekov, Julie J -- Zalocusky, Kelly A -- Mattis, Joanna -- Denisin, Aleksandra K -- Pak, Sally -- Bernstein, Hannah -- Ramakrishnan, Charu -- Grosenick, Logan -- Gradinaru, Viviana -- Deisseroth, Karl -- DP1 OD000616/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA020794/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH099647/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2013 May 16;497(7449):332-7. doi: 10.1038/nature12107. Epub 2013 Apr 10.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Bioengineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23575631" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Brain/*anatomy & histology ; Cross-Linking Reagents/chemistry ; Formaldehyde/chemistry ; Humans ; Hydrogel/chemistry ; Imaging, Three-Dimensional/*methods ; In Situ Hybridization/methods ; Lipids/isolation & purification ; Mice ; Molecular Imaging/*methods ; Permeability ; Phenotype ; Scattering, Radiation
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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