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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-08-17
    Description: Inactivation of tumour-suppressor genes by homozygous deletion is a prototypic event in the cancer genome, yet such deletions often encompass neighbouring genes. We propose that homozygous deletions in such passenger genes can expose cancer-specific therapeutic vulnerabilities when the collaterally deleted gene is a member of a functionally redundant family of genes carrying out an essential function. The glycolytic gene enolase 1 (ENO1) in the 1p36 locus is deleted in glioblastoma (GBM), which is tolerated by the expression of ENO2. Here we show that short-hairpin-RNA-mediated silencing of ENO2 selectively inhibits growth, survival and the tumorigenic potential of ENO1-deleted GBM cells, and that the enolase inhibitor phosphonoacetohydroxamate is selectively toxic to ENO1-deleted GBM cells relative to ENO1-intact GBM cells or normal astrocytes. The principle of collateral vulnerability should be applicable to other passenger-deleted genes encoding functionally redundant essential activities and provide an effective treatment strategy for cancers containing such genomic events.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3712624/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3712624/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Muller, Florian L -- Colla, Simona -- Aquilanti, Elisa -- Manzo, Veronica E -- Genovese, Giannicola -- Lee, Jaclyn -- Eisenson, Daniel -- Narurkar, Rujuta -- Deng, Pingna -- Nezi, Luigi -- Lee, Michelle A -- Hu, Baoli -- Hu, Jian -- Sahin, Ergun -- Ong, Derrick -- Fletcher-Sananikone, Eliot -- Ho, Dennis -- Kwong, Lawrence -- Brennan, Cameron -- Wang, Y Alan -- Chin, Lynda -- DePinho, Ronald A -- 3 P01 CA095616-08S1/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- 57006984/Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- P01 CA095616/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01CA95616/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32-CA009361/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Aug 16;488(7411):337-42. doi: 10.1038/nature11331.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Genomic Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22895339" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Biomarkers, Tumor/deficiency/genetics ; Brain Neoplasms/*drug therapy/*genetics/pathology ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Proliferation ; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 1/genetics ; DNA-Binding Proteins/deficiency/genetics ; Enzyme Inhibitors ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Genes, Essential/*genetics ; Genes, Tumor Suppressor ; Glioblastoma/*drug therapy/*genetics/pathology ; Homozygote ; Humans ; Hydroxamic Acids/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Mice ; Molecular Targeted Therapy/*methods ; Neoplasm Transplantation ; Phosphonoacetic Acid/analogs & derivatives/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Phosphopyruvate Hydratase/antagonists & inhibitors/deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; RNA, Small Interfering/genetics ; Sequence Deletion/*genetics ; Tumor Suppressor Proteins/deficiency/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2014-08-15
    Description: Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the deadliest cancers in western countries, with a median survival of 6 months and an extremely low percentage of long-term surviving patients. KRAS mutations are known to be a driver event of PDAC, but targeting mutant KRAS has proved challenging. Targeting oncogene-driven signalling pathways is a clinically validated approach for several devastating diseases. Still, despite marked tumour shrinkage, the frequency of relapse indicates that a fraction of tumour cells survives shut down of oncogenic signalling. Here we explore the role of mutant KRAS in PDAC maintenance using a recently developed inducible mouse model of mutated Kras (Kras(G12D), herein KRas) in a p53(LoxP/WT) background. We demonstrate that a subpopulation of dormant tumour cells surviving oncogene ablation (surviving cells) and responsible for tumour relapse has features of cancer stem cells and relies on oxidative phosphorylation for survival. Transcriptomic and metabolic analyses of surviving cells reveal prominent expression of genes governing mitochondrial function, autophagy and lysosome activity, as well as a strong reliance on mitochondrial respiration and a decreased dependence on glycolysis for cellular energetics. Accordingly, surviving cells show high sensitivity to oxidative phosphorylation inhibitors, which can inhibit tumour recurrence. Our integrated analyses illuminate a therapeutic strategy of combined targeting of the KRAS pathway and mitochondrial respiration to manage pancreatic cancer.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4376130/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4376130/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Viale, Andrea -- Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio -- Lyssiotis, Costas A -- Ying, Haoqiang -- Sanchez, Nora -- Marchesini, Matteo -- Carugo, Alessandro -- Green, Tessa -- Seth, Sahil -- Giuliani, Virginia -- Kost-Alimova, Maria -- Muller, Florian -- Colla, Simona -- Nezi, Luigi -- Genovese, Giannicola -- Deem, Angela K -- Kapoor, Avnish -- Yao, Wantong -- Brunetto, Emanuela -- Kang, Ya'an -- Yuan, Min -- Asara, John M -- Wang, Y Alan -- Heffernan, Timothy P -- Kimmelman, Alec C -- Wang, Huamin -- Fleming, Jason B -- Cantley, Lewis C -- DePinho, Ronald A -- Draetta, Giulio F -- CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA16672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA117969/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA120964/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01CA117969/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01CA120964/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30CA16672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA127003/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Oct 30;514(7524):628-32. doi: 10.1038/nature13611. Epub 2014 Aug 10.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Genomic Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3]. ; Department of Medicine, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Department of Genomic Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] Department of Genomic Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] Department of Genomic Medicine, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Department of Molecular and Cellular Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3] Department of Experimental Oncology, European Institute of Oncology, Milan 20139, Italy. ; Institute for Applied Cancer Science, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Pathology Unit, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan 20132, Italy. ; Department of Surgical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Medicine, Division of Signal Transduction, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA. ; Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. ; Department of Pathology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25119024" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Autophagy ; Carcinoma, Pancreatic Ductal/drug therapy/genetics/*metabolism/*pathology ; Cell Respiration/drug effects ; Cell Survival/drug effects ; Disease Models, Animal ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Genes, p53/genetics ; Glycolysis ; Lysosomes/metabolism ; Mice ; Mitochondria/drug effects/*metabolism ; Mutation/genetics ; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local/prevention & control ; Neoplastic Stem Cells/drug effects/metabolism/pathology ; Oxidative Phosphorylation/drug effects ; Pancreatic Neoplasms/drug therapy/genetics/*metabolism/*pathology ; Proto-Oncogene Proteins p21(ras)/*genetics/metabolism ; Recurrence ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-01-20
    Description: The involvement of whole-chromosome aneuploidy in tumorigenesis is the subject of debate, in large part because of the lack of insight into underlying mechanisms. Here we identify a mechanism by which errors in mitotic chromosome segregation generate DNA breaks via the formation of structures called micronuclei. Whole-chromosome-containing micronuclei form when mitotic errors produce lagging chromosomes. We tracked the fate of newly generated micronuclei and found that they undergo defective and asynchronous DNA replication, resulting in DNA damage and often extensive fragmentation of the chromosome in the micronucleus. Micronuclei can persist in cells over several generations but the chromosome in the micronucleus can also be distributed to daughter nuclei. Thus, chromosome segregation errors potentially lead to mutations and chromosome rearrangements that can integrate into the genome. Pulverization of chromosomes in micronuclei may also be one explanation for 'chromothripsis' in cancer and developmental disorders, where isolated chromosomes or chromosome arms undergo massive local DNA breakage and rearrangement.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3271137/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3271137/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Crasta, Karen -- Ganem, Neil J -- Dagher, Regina -- Lantermann, Alexandra B -- Ivanova, Elena V -- Pan, Yunfeng -- Nezi, Luigi -- Protopopov, Alexei -- Chowdhury, Dipanjan -- Pellman, David -- 1R01CA142698-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- GM083299/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R00 CA154531/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA142698/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM083299/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM083299-14/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Jan 18;482(7383):53-8. doi: 10.1038/nature10802.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, 450 Brookline Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22258507" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Aneuploidy ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/genetics/pathology ; *Chromosome Breakage ; Chromosome Segregation ; Comet Assay ; DNA Fragmentation ; DNA Replication ; Humans ; *Micronuclei, Chromosome-Defective ; *Mitosis/genetics ; Neoplasms/etiology/genetics/pathology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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