Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    facet.materialart.
    facet.materialart.
    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  83. Jahresversammlung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Hals-Nasen-Ohren-Heilkunde, Kopf- und Hals-Chirurgie; 20120516-20120520; Mainz; DOC12hnod467 /20120404/
    Publication Date: 2012-04-05
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: conferenceObject
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    facet.materialart.
    facet.materialart.
    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  Mainz//2011; 56. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Medizinische Informatik, Biometrie und Epidemiologie (gmds), 6. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Epidemiologie (DGEpi); 20110926-20110929; Mainz; DOC11gmds547 /20110920/
    Publication Date: 2011-09-20
    Keywords: GTDS ; SOA ; Tumordokumentation ; Webservice ; ddc: 610
    Language: German
    Type: conferenceObject
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2012-10-19
    Description: Nuclear-architecture defects have been shown to correlate with the manifestation of a number of human diseases as well as ageing. It is therefore plausible that diseases whose manifestations correlate with ageing might be connected to the appearance of nuclear aberrations over time. We decided to evaluate nuclear organization in the context of ageing-associated disorders by focusing on a leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) dominant mutation (G2019S; glycine-to-serine substitution at amino acid 2019), which is associated with familial and sporadic Parkinson's disease as well as impairment of adult neurogenesis in mice. Here we report on the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from Parkinson's disease patients and the implications of LRRK2(G2019S) mutation in human neural-stem-cell (NSC) populations. Mutant NSCs showed increased susceptibility to proteasomal stress as well as passage-dependent deficiencies in nuclear-envelope organization, clonal expansion and neuronal differentiation. Disease phenotypes were rescued by targeted correction of the LRRK2(G2019S) mutation with its wild-type counterpart in Parkinson's disease iPSCs and were recapitulated after targeted knock-in of the LRRK2(G2019S) mutation in human embryonic stem cells. Analysis of human brain tissue showed nuclear-envelope impairment in clinically diagnosed Parkinson's disease patients. Together, our results identify the nucleus as a previously unknown cellular organelle in Parkinson's disease pathology and may help to open new avenues for Parkinson's disease diagnoses as well as for the potential development of therapeutics targeting this fundamental cell structure.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3504651/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3504651/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Liu, Guang-Hui -- Qu, Jing -- Suzuki, Keiichiro -- Nivet, Emmanuel -- Li, Mo -- Montserrat, Nuria -- Yi, Fei -- Xu, Xiuling -- Ruiz, Sergio -- Zhang, Weiqi -- Wagner, Ulrich -- Kim, Audrey -- Ren, Bing -- Li, Ying -- Goebl, April -- Kim, Jessica -- Soligalla, Rupa Devi -- Dubova, Ilir -- Thompson, James -- Yates, John 3rd -- Esteban, Concepcion Rodriguez -- Sancho-Martinez, Ignacio -- Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos -- ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- GTB07001/Telethon/Italy -- P41 RR011823/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- U01 ES017166/ES/NIEHS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Nov 22;491(7425):603-7. doi: 10.1038/nature11557. Epub 2012 Oct 17.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100101, China. ghliu@ibp.ac.cn〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23075850" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Apoptosis ; Cell Differentiation ; Cell Division ; Cell Line ; Clone Cells/metabolism/pathology ; Embryonic Stem Cells/metabolism/pathology ; Gene Knock-In Techniques ; Humans ; Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells/metabolism/pathology ; Mutant Proteins/genetics/*metabolism ; Mutation ; Neural Stem Cells/metabolism/*pathology ; Nuclear Envelope/genetics/pathology ; Parkinson Disease/*pathology ; Proteasome Endopeptidase Complex/metabolism ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/*genetics/*metabolism ; Stress, Physiological
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2012-11-16
    Description: For 10,000 years pigs and humans have shared a close and complex relationship. From domestication to modern breeding practices, humans have shaped the genomes of domestic pigs. Here we present the assembly and analysis of the genome sequence of a female domestic Duroc pig (Sus scrofa) and a comparison with the genomes of wild and domestic pigs from Europe and Asia. Wild pigs emerged in South East Asia and subsequently spread across Eurasia. Our results reveal a deep phylogenetic split between European and Asian wild boars approximately 1 million years ago, and a selective sweep analysis indicates selection on genes involved in RNA processing and regulation. Genes associated with immune response and olfaction exhibit fast evolution. Pigs have the largest repertoire of functional olfactory receptor genes, reflecting the importance of smell in this scavenging animal. The pig genome sequence provides an important resource for further improvements of this important livestock species, and our identification of many putative disease-causing variants extends the potential of the pig as a biomedical model.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3566564/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3566564/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Groenen, Martien A M -- Archibald, Alan L -- Uenishi, Hirohide -- Tuggle, Christopher K -- Takeuchi, Yasuhiro -- Rothschild, Max F -- Rogel-Gaillard, Claire -- Park, Chankyu -- Milan, Denis -- Megens, Hendrik-Jan -- Li, Shengting -- Larkin, Denis M -- Kim, Heebal -- Frantz, Laurent A F -- Caccamo, Mario -- Ahn, Hyeonju -- Aken, Bronwen L -- Anselmo, Anna -- Anthon, Christian -- Auvil, Loretta -- Badaoui, Bouabid -- Beattie, Craig W -- Bendixen, Christian -- Berman, Daniel -- Blecha, Frank -- Blomberg, Jonas -- Bolund, Lars -- Bosse, Mirte -- Botti, Sara -- Bujie, Zhan -- Bystrom, Megan -- Capitanu, Boris -- Carvalho-Silva, Denise -- Chardon, Patrick -- Chen, Celine -- Cheng, Ryan -- Choi, Sang-Haeng -- Chow, William -- Clark, Richard C -- Clee, Christopher -- Crooijmans, Richard P M A -- Dawson, Harry D -- Dehais, Patrice -- De Sapio, Fioravante -- Dibbits, Bert -- Drou, Nizar -- Du, Zhi-Qiang -- Eversole, Kellye -- Fadista, Joao -- Fairley, Susan -- Faraut, Thomas -- Faulkner, Geoffrey J -- Fowler, Katie E -- Fredholm, Merete -- Fritz, Eric -- Gilbert, James G R -- Giuffra, Elisabetta -- Gorodkin, Jan -- Griffin, Darren K -- Harrow, Jennifer L -- Hayward, Alexander -- Howe, Kerstin -- Hu, Zhi-Liang -- Humphray, Sean J -- Hunt, Toby -- Hornshoj, Henrik -- Jeon, Jin-Tae -- Jern, Patric -- Jones, Matthew -- Jurka, Jerzy -- Kanamori, Hiroyuki -- Kapetanovic, Ronan -- Kim, Jaebum -- Kim, Jae-Hwan -- Kim, Kyu-Won -- Kim, Tae-Hun -- Larson, Greger -- Lee, Kyooyeol -- Lee, Kyung-Tai -- Leggett, Richard -- Lewin, Harris A -- Li, Yingrui -- Liu, Wansheng -- Loveland, Jane E -- Lu, Yao -- Lunney, Joan K -- Ma, Jian -- Madsen, Ole -- Mann, Katherine -- Matthews, Lucy -- McLaren, Stuart -- Morozumi, Takeya -- Murtaugh, Michael P -- Narayan, Jitendra -- Nguyen, Dinh Truong -- Ni, Peixiang -- Oh, Song-Jung -- Onteru, Suneel -- Panitz, Frank -- Park, Eung-Woo -- Park, Hong-Seog -- Pascal, Geraldine -- Paudel, Yogesh -- Perez-Enciso, Miguel -- Ramirez-Gonzalez, Ricardo -- Reecy, James M -- Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra -- Rohrer, Gary A -- Rund, Lauretta -- Sang, Yongming -- Schachtschneider, Kyle -- Schraiber, Joshua G -- Schwartz, John -- Scobie, Linda -- Scott, Carol -- Searle, Stephen -- Servin, Bertrand -- Southey, Bruce R -- Sperber, Goran -- Stadler, Peter -- Sweedler, Jonathan V -- Tafer, Hakim -- Thomsen, Bo -- Wali, Rashmi -- Wang, Jian -- Wang, Jun -- White, Simon -- Xu, Xun -- Yerle, Martine -- Zhang, Guojie -- Zhang, Jianguo -- Zhang, Jie -- Zhao, Shuhong -- Rogers, Jane -- Churcher, Carol -- Schook, Lawrence B -- 095908/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 249894/European Research Council/International -- 5 P41 LM006252/LM/NLM NIH HHS/ -- 5 P41LM006252/LM/NLM NIH HHS/ -- BB/E010520/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/E010520/2/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/E010768/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/E011640/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/G004013/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/H005935/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/I025328/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- G0900950/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- P20-RR017686/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- P30 DA018310/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R13 RR020283A/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- R13 RR032267A/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- R21 DA027548/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R21 HG006464/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI083196/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Nov 15;491(7424):393-8. doi: 10.1038/nature11622.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Animal Breeding and Genomics Centre, Wageningen University, De Elst 1, 6708 WD, Wageningen, The Netherlands. martien.groenen@wur.nl〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23151582" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Demography ; Genome/*genetics ; Models, Animal ; Molecular Sequence Data ; *Phylogeny ; Population Dynamics ; Sus scrofa/*classification/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2012-04-13
    Description: The spatial organization of the genome is intimately linked to its biological function, yet our understanding of higher order genomic structure is coarse, fragmented and incomplete. In the nucleus of eukaryotic cells, interphase chromosomes occupy distinct chromosome territories, and numerous models have been proposed for how chromosomes fold within chromosome territories. These models, however, provide only few mechanistic details about the relationship between higher order chromatin structure and genome function. Recent advances in genomic technologies have led to rapid advances in the study of three-dimensional genome organization. In particular, Hi-C has been introduced as a method for identifying higher order chromatin interactions genome wide. Here we investigate the three-dimensional organization of the human and mouse genomes in embryonic stem cells and terminally differentiated cell types at unprecedented resolution. We identify large, megabase-sized local chromatin interaction domains, which we term 'topological domains', as a pervasive structural feature of the genome organization. These domains correlate with regions of the genome that constrain the spread of heterochromatin. The domains are stable across different cell types and highly conserved across species, indicating that topological domains are an inherent property of mammalian genomes. Finally, we find that the boundaries of topological domains are enriched for the insulator binding protein CTCF, housekeeping genes, transfer RNAs and short interspersed element (SINE) retrotransposons, indicating that these factors may have a role in establishing the topological domain structure of the genome.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356448/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356448/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Dixon, Jesse R -- Selvaraj, Siddarth -- Yue, Feng -- Kim, Audrey -- Li, Yan -- Shen, Yin -- Hu, Ming -- Liu, Jun S -- Ren, Bing -- R01 HG003991/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG003991-03/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG003991-03S1/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01GH003991/GH/CGH CDC HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Apr 11;485(7398):376-80. doi: 10.1038/nature11082.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Ludwig Institute for Cancer Research, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22495300" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Binding Sites ; Cell Differentiation ; Chromatin/chemistry/*genetics/*metabolism ; Chromosomes/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Embryonic Stem Cells/metabolism ; Evolution, Molecular ; Female ; Genes, Essential/genetics ; *Genome ; Heterochromatin/chemistry/genetics/metabolism ; Humans ; Male ; Mammals/genetics ; Mice ; RNA, Transfer/genetics ; Repressor Proteins/metabolism ; Short Interspersed Nucleotide Elements/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2012-10-02
    Description: Assessment and characterization of gut microbiota has become a major research area in human disease, including type 2 diabetes, the most prevalent endocrine disease worldwide. To carry out analysis on gut microbial content in patients with type 2 diabetes, we developed a protocol for a metagenome-wide association study (MGWAS) and undertook a two-stage MGWAS based on deep shotgun sequencing of the gut microbial DNA from 345 Chinese individuals. We identified and validated approximately 60,000 type-2-diabetes-associated markers and established the concept of a metagenomic linkage group, enabling taxonomic species-level analyses. MGWAS analysis showed that patients with type 2 diabetes were characterized by a moderate degree of gut microbial dysbiosis, a decrease in the abundance of some universal butyrate-producing bacteria and an increase in various opportunistic pathogens, as well as an enrichment of other microbial functions conferring sulphate reduction and oxidative stress resistance. An analysis of 23 additional individuals demonstrated that these gut microbial markers might be useful for classifying type 2 diabetes.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Qin, Junjie -- Li, Yingrui -- Cai, Zhiming -- Li, Shenghui -- Zhu, Jianfeng -- Zhang, Fan -- Liang, Suisha -- Zhang, Wenwei -- Guan, Yuanlin -- Shen, Dongqian -- Peng, Yangqing -- Zhang, Dongya -- Jie, Zhuye -- Wu, Wenxian -- Qin, Youwen -- Xue, Wenbin -- Li, Junhua -- Han, Lingchuan -- Lu, Donghui -- Wu, Peixian -- Dai, Yali -- Sun, Xiaojuan -- Li, Zesong -- Tang, Aifa -- Zhong, Shilong -- Li, Xiaoping -- Chen, Weineng -- Xu, Ran -- Wang, Mingbang -- Feng, Qiang -- Gong, Meihua -- Yu, Jing -- Zhang, Yanyan -- Zhang, Ming -- Hansen, Torben -- Sanchez, Gaston -- Raes, Jeroen -- Falony, Gwen -- Okuda, Shujiro -- Almeida, Mathieu -- LeChatelier, Emmanuelle -- Renault, Pierre -- Pons, Nicolas -- Batto, Jean-Michel -- Zhang, Zhaoxi -- Chen, Hua -- Yang, Ruifu -- Zheng, Weimou -- Li, Songgang -- Yang, Huanming -- Wang, Jian -- Ehrlich, S Dusko -- Nielsen, Rasmus -- Pedersen, Oluf -- Kristiansen, Karsten -- Wang, Jun -- England -- Nature. 2012 Oct 4;490(7418):55-60. doi: 10.1038/nature11450. Epub 2012 Sep 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉BGI-Shenzhen, Shenzhen 518083, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23023125" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Asian Continental Ancestry Group ; Butyrates/metabolism ; China/ethnology ; Cohort Studies ; Diabetes Mellitus, Type ; 2/classification/complications/*microbiology/physiopathology ; Feces/microbiology ; Genetic Linkage/genetics ; Genetic Markers ; Genome-Wide Association Study/*methods ; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing ; Humans ; Intestines/*microbiology ; Metabolic Networks and Pathways/genetics ; Metagenome/*genetics ; Metagenomics/*methods ; Opportunistic Infections/complications/microbiology ; Reference Standards ; Sulfates/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-11-11
    Description: Lysosomal degradation of cytoplasmic components by autophagy is essential for cellular survival and homeostasis under nutrient-deprived conditions. Acute regulation of autophagy by nutrient-sensing kinases is well defined, but longer-term transcriptional regulation is relatively unknown. Here we show that the fed-state sensing nuclear receptor farnesoid X receptor (FXR) and the fasting transcriptional activator cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) coordinately regulate the hepatic autophagy gene network. Pharmacological activation of FXR repressed many autophagy genes and inhibited autophagy even in fasted mice, and feeding-mediated inhibition of macroautophagy was attenuated in FXR-knockout mice. From mouse liver chromatin immunoprecipitation and high-throughput sequencing data, FXR and CREB binding peaks were detected at 178 and 112 genes, respectively, out of 230 autophagy-related genes, and 78 genes showed shared binding, mostly in their promoter regions. CREB promoted autophagic degradation of lipids, or lipophagy, under nutrient-deprived conditions, and FXR inhibited this response. Mechanistically, CREB upregulated autophagy genes, including Atg7, Ulk1 and Tfeb, by recruiting the coactivator CRTC2. After feeding or pharmacological activation, FXR trans-repressed these genes by disrupting the functional CREB-CRTC2 complex. This study identifies the new FXR-CREB axis as a key physiological switch regulating autophagy, resulting in sustained nutrient regulation of autophagy during feeding/fasting cycles.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4257899/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4257899/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Seok, Sunmi -- Fu, Ting -- Choi, Sung-E -- Li, Yang -- Zhu, Rong -- Kumar, Subodh -- Sun, Xiaoxiao -- Yoon, Gyesoon -- Kang, Yup -- Zhong, Wenxuan -- Ma, Jian -- Kemper, Byron -- Kemper, Jongsook Kim -- DK62777/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK95842/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK062777/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK095842/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Dec 4;516(7529):108-11. doi: 10.1038/nature13949. Epub 2014 Nov 12.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA. ; 1] Department of Molecular and Integrative Physiology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA [2] Institute for Medical Science, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 442-749, Korea. ; Department of Bioengineering and the Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801, USA. ; Department of Statistics, University of Georgia, Athens, Gerogia 30602, USA. ; Institute for Medical Science, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon 442-749, Korea.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25383523" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Autophagy/*genetics ; Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein/*metabolism ; Fasting/physiology ; *Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects ; Isoxazoles/pharmacology ; Liver/cytology/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Protein Binding ; Receptors, Cytoplasmic and Nuclear/agonists/*metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2014-03-05
    Description: Recognition of modified histones by 'reader' proteins plays a critical role in the regulation of chromatin. H3K36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) is deposited onto the nucleosomes in the transcribed regions after RNA polymerase II elongation. In yeast, this mark in turn recruits epigenetic regulators to reset the chromatin to a relatively repressive state, thus suppressing cryptic transcription. However, much less is known about the role of H3K36me3 in transcription regulation in mammals. This is further complicated by the transcription-coupled incorporation of the histone variant H3.3 in gene bodies. Here we show that the candidate tumour suppressor ZMYND11 specifically recognizes H3K36me3 on H3.3 (H3.3K36me3) and regulates RNA polymerase II elongation. Structural studies show that in addition to the trimethyl-lysine binding by an aromatic cage within the PWWP domain, the H3.3-dependent recognition is mediated by the encapsulation of the H3.3-specific 'Ser 31' residue in a composite pocket formed by the tandem bromo-PWWP domains of ZMYND11. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing shows a genome-wide co-localization of ZMYND11 with H3K36me3 and H3.3 in gene bodies, and its occupancy requires the pre-deposition of H3.3K36me3. Although ZMYND11 is associated with highly expressed genes, it functions as an unconventional transcription co-repressor by modulating RNA polymerase II at the elongation stage. ZMYND11 is critical for the repression of a transcriptional program that is essential for tumour cell growth; low expression levels of ZMYND11 in breast cancer patients correlate with worse prognosis. Consistently, overexpression of ZMYND11 suppresses cancer cell growth in vitro and tumour formation in mice. Together, this study identifies ZMYND11 as an H3.3-specific reader of H3K36me3 that links the histone-variant-mediated transcription elongation control to tumour suppression.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4142212/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wen, Hong -- Li, Yuanyuan -- Xi, Yuanxin -- Jiang, Shiming -- Stratton, Sabrina -- Peng, Danni -- Tanaka, Kaori -- Ren, Yongfeng -- Xia, Zheng -- Wu, Jun -- Li, Bing -- Barton, Michelle C -- Li, Wei -- Li, Haitao -- Shi, Xiaobing -- CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P30 CA016672/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01GM090077/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01HG007538/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Apr 10;508(7495):263-8. doi: 10.1038/nature13045. Epub 2014 Mar 2.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3]. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [3]. ; 1] Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2]. ; Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; 1] MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Sciences, Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China [2] Department of Basic Medical Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; Dan L. Duncan Cancer Center, Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, Texas 77030, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [2] Center for Cancer Epigenetics, Center for Genetics and Genomics, and Center for Stem Cell and Developmental Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030, USA [3] Genes and Development Graduate Program, The University of Texas Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Houston, Teaxs 77030, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24590075" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Sequence ; Animals ; Breast Neoplasms/*genetics/metabolism/*pathology ; Carrier Proteins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Chromatin/genetics/metabolism ; Co-Repressor Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Disease-Free Survival ; Female ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic/genetics ; Histones/chemistry/*metabolism ; Humans ; Lysine/*metabolism ; Methylation ; Mice ; Mice, Nude ; Models, Molecular ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Oncogenes/genetics ; Prognosis ; Protein Binding ; Protein Conformation ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; RNA Polymerase II/*metabolism ; Substrate Specificity ; *Transcription Elongation, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2014-02-21
    Description: Crohn's disease is a debilitating inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) that can involve the entire digestive tract. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) encoding a missense variant in the autophagy gene ATG16L1 (rs2241880, Thr300Ala) is strongly associated with the incidence of Crohn's disease. Numerous studies have demonstrated the effect of ATG16L1 deletion or deficiency; however, the molecular consequences of the Thr300Ala (T300A) variant remains unknown. Here we show that amino acids 296-299 constitute a caspase cleavage motif in ATG16L1 and that the T300A variant (T316A in mice) significantly increases ATG16L1 sensitization to caspase-3-mediated processing. We observed that death-receptor activation or starvation-induced metabolic stress in human and murine macrophages increased degradation of the T300A or T316A variants of ATG16L1, respectively, resulting in diminished autophagy. Knock-in mice harbouring the T316A variant showed defective clearance of the ileal pathogen Yersinia enterocolitica and an elevated inflammatory cytokine response. In turn, deletion of the caspase-3-encoding gene, Casp3, or elimination of the caspase cleavage site by site-directed mutagenesis rescued starvation-induced autophagy and pathogen clearance, respectively. These findings demonstrate that caspase 3 activation in the presence of a common risk allele leads to accelerated degradation of ATG16L1, placing cellular stress, apoptotic stimuli and impaired autophagy in a unified pathway that predisposes to Crohn's disease.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Murthy, Aditya -- Li, Yun -- Peng, Ivan -- Reichelt, Mike -- Katakam, Anand Kumar -- Noubade, Rajkumar -- Roose-Girma, Merone -- DeVoss, Jason -- Diehl, Lauri -- Graham, Robert R -- van Lookeren Campagne, Menno -- England -- Nature. 2014 Feb 27;506(7489):456-62. doi: 10.1038/nature13044. Epub 2014 Feb 19.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Immunology, Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; Department of Pathology, Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; Department of Molecular Biology, Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA. ; ITGR Human Genetics, Genentech, Inc., 1 DNA Way, South San Francisco, California 94080, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24553140" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Motifs ; Animals ; Autophagy/genetics ; Carrier Proteins/chemistry/*genetics/*metabolism ; Caspase 3/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Cell Line ; Cells, Cultured ; Crohn Disease/*genetics/pathology ; Cytokines/immunology ; Enzyme Activation ; Female ; Food Deprivation ; Humans ; Macrophages/immunology/metabolism ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mutagenesis, Site-Directed ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide/*genetics ; *Proteolysis ; Stress, Physiological ; Yersinia enterocolitica/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2014-02-07
    Description: Vaccines prevent infectious disease largely by inducing protective neutralizing antibodies against vulnerable epitopes. Several major pathogens have resisted traditional vaccine development, although vulnerable epitopes targeted by neutralizing antibodies have been identified for several such cases. Hence, new vaccine design methods to induce epitope-specific neutralizing antibodies are needed. Here we show, with a neutralization epitope from respiratory syncytial virus, that computational protein design can generate small, thermally and conformationally stable protein scaffolds that accurately mimic the viral epitope structure and induce potent neutralizing antibodies. These scaffolds represent promising leads for the research and development of a human respiratory syncytial virus vaccine needed to protect infants, young children and the elderly. More generally, the results provide proof of principle for epitope-focused and scaffold-based vaccine design, and encourage the evaluation and further development of these strategies for a variety of other vaccine targets, including antigenically highly variable pathogens such as human immunodeficiency virus and influenza.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4260937/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4260937/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Correia, Bruno E -- Bates, John T -- Loomis, Rebecca J -- Baneyx, Gretchen -- Carrico, Chris -- Jardine, Joseph G -- Rupert, Peter -- Correnti, Colin -- Kalyuzhniy, Oleksandr -- Vittal, Vinayak -- Connell, Mary J -- Stevens, Eric -- Schroeter, Alexandria -- Chen, Man -- Macpherson, Skye -- Serra, Andreia M -- Adachi, Yumiko -- Holmes, Margaret A -- Li, Yuxing -- Klevit, Rachel E -- Graham, Barney S -- Wyatt, Richard T -- Baker, David -- Strong, Roland K -- Crowe, James E Jr -- Johnson, Philip R -- Schief, William R -- 1R01AI102766-01A1/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 1UM1AI100663/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- 2T32GM007270/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- 5R21AI088554/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P01 AI094419/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P01AI094419/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P30 AI036214/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P30 AI045008/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- P30AI36214/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R01 AI102766/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R21 AI088554/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- T32 CA080416/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- T32 GM007270/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- T32CA080416/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- U54 AI 005714/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- U54 AI057141/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- UM1 AI100663/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Mar 13;507(7491):201-6. doi: 10.1038/nature12966. Epub 2014 Feb 5.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉1] Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [2] PhD Program in Computational Biology, Instituto Gulbenkian Ciencia and Instituto de Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras 2780-157, Portugal [3] Department of Chemical Physiology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; The Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA. ; The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Research Institute, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104, USA. ; Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA. ; Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington 98109-1024, USA. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [2] Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [3] IAVI Neutralizing Antibody Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [4] Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] Department of Biochemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195, USA [2] IAVI Neutralizing Antibody Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [3] Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; Vaccine Research Center, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA. ; 1] Division of Basic Sciences, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, Washington 98109-1024, USA [2]. ; 1] Department of Immunology and Microbial Science, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [2] IAVI Neutralizing Antibody Center, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA [3] Center for HIV/AIDS Vaccine Immunology and Immunogen Discovery, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA. ; 1] The Vanderbilt Vaccine Center, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA [2] Department of Pathology, Microbiology and Immunology, Vanderbilt Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA [3] Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee 37232, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24499818" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Motifs ; Animals ; Antibodies, Monoclonal/analysis/immunology ; Antibodies, Neutralizing/analysis/immunology ; Antibodies, Viral/analysis/immunology ; Antigens, Viral/chemistry/immunology ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; *Drug Design ; Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay ; Epitopes/*chemistry/*immunology ; Macaca mulatta/immunology ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred BALB C ; Models, Molecular ; Neutralization Tests ; Protein Conformation ; *Protein Stability ; Respiratory Syncytial Virus Vaccines/*chemistry/*immunology ; Respiratory Syncytial Viruses/chemistry/immunology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...