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  • 1
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  18th Symposium on Infections in the Immunocompromised Host; 20140615-20140617; Berlin; DOC14ichs27 /20140603/
    Publication Date: 2014-06-04
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 2
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  18th Symposium on Infections in the Immunocompromised Host; 20140615-20140617; Berlin; DOC14ichs26 /20140603/
    Publication Date: 2014-06-04
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 3
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    German Medical Science GMS Publishing House; Düsseldorf
    In:  Deutscher Kongress für Orthopädie und Unfallchirurgie (DKOU 2014); 20141028-20141031; Berlin; DOCWI40-977 /20141013/
    Publication Date: 2014-10-14
    Keywords: ddc: 610
    Language: English
    Type: conferenceObject
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-12-21
    Description: The inbred mouse C57BL/6J is the reference strain for genome sequence and for most behavioral and physiological phenotypes. However, the International Knockout Mouse Consortium uses an embryonic stem cell line derived from a related C57BL/6N substrain. We found that C57BL/6N has a lower acute and sensitized response to cocaine and methamphetamine. We mapped a single causative locus and identified a nonsynonymous mutation of serine to phenylalanine (S968F) in Cytoplasmic FMRP interacting protein 2 (Cyfip2) as the causative variant. The S968F mutation destabilizes CYFIP2, and deletion of the C57BL/6N mutant allele leads to acute and sensitized cocaine-response phenotypes. We propose that CYFIP2 is a key regulator of cocaine response in mammals and present a framework to use mouse substrains to identify previously unknown genes and alleles regulating behavior.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4500108/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4500108/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kumar, Vivek -- Kim, Kyungin -- Joseph, Chryshanthi -- Kourrich, Said -- Yoo, Seung-Hee -- Huang, Hung Chung -- Vitaterna, Martha H -- de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel -- Churchill, Gary -- Bonci, Antonello -- Takahashi, Joseph S -- F32 DA024556/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- F32DA024556/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- U01 MH061915/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U01MH61915/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Dec 20;342(6165):1508-12. doi: 10.1126/science.1245503.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Neuroscience, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9111, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24357318" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Amino Acid Substitution ; Animals ; Central Nervous System Stimulants/administration & dosage ; Cocaine/*administration & dosage ; Cocaine-Related Disorders/*genetics/*psychology ; *Drug-Seeking Behavior ; Methamphetamine/administration & dosage ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mice, Knockout ; Motor Activity/drug effects ; Mutation ; Nerve Tissue Proteins/genetics/*physiology ; Phenylalanine/genetics ; Polymorphism, Single Nucleotide ; Psychomotor Performance/drug effects ; Quantitative Trait Loci ; Serine/genetics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2014-11-29
    Description: DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) are highly toxic lesions associated with cancer and degenerative diseases. ICLs can be repaired by the Fanconi anemia (FA) pathway and through FA-independent processes involving the FAN1 nuclease. In this work, FAN1-DNA crystal structures and biochemical data reveal that human FAN1 cleaves DNA successively at every third nucleotide. In vitro, this exonuclease mechanism allows FAN1 to excise an ICL from one strand through flanking incisions. DNA access requires a 5'-terminal phosphate anchor at a nick or a 1- or 2-nucleotide flap and is augmented by a 3' flap, suggesting that FAN1 action is coupled to DNA synthesis or recombination. FAN1's mechanism of ICL excision is well suited for processing other localized DNA adducts as well.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4285437/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4285437/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Wang, Renjing -- Persky, Nicole S -- Yoo, Barney -- Ouerfelli, Ouathek -- Smogorzewska, Agata -- Elledge, Stephen J -- Pavletich, Nikola P -- P30 CA008748/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL120922/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01HL120922/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Nov 28;346(6213):1127-30. doi: 10.1126/science.1258973.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Structural Biology Program and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA. ; Molecular Pharmacology and Chemistry Program, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA. ; Laboratory of Genome Maintenance, The Rockefeller University, New York, NY 10065, USA. ; Department of Genetics and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115, USA. Division of Genetics, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115, USA. ; Structural Biology Program and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY 10065, USA. pavletin@mskcc.org.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25430771" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: DNA/biosynthesis/*chemistry/genetics ; DNA Adducts/*chemistry/genetics ; *DNA Repair ; DNA Replication ; Exodeoxyribonucleases/*chemistry/genetics ; Humans ; Nucleic Acid Conformation ; Protein Conformation ; Recombination, Genetic
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2012-09-01
    Description: The mammalian circadian clock involves a transcriptional feed back loop in which CLOCK and BMAL1 activate the Period and Cryptochrome genes, which then feedback and repress their own transcription. We have interrogated the transcriptional architecture of the circadian transcriptional regulatory loop on a genome scale in mouse liver and find a stereotyped, time-dependent pattern of transcription factor binding, RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) recruitment, RNA expression, and chromatin states. We find that the circadian transcriptional cycle of the clock consists of three distinct phases: a poised state, a coordinated de novo transcriptional activation state, and a repressed state. Only 22% of messenger RNA (mRNA) cycling genes are driven by de novo transcription, suggesting that both transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms underlie the mammalian circadian clock. We also find that circadian modulation of RNAPII recruitment and chromatin remodeling occurs on a genome-wide scale far greater than that seen previously by gene expression profiling.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3694775/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3694775/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Koike, Nobuya -- Yoo, Seung-Hee -- Huang, Hung-Chung -- Kumar, Vivek -- Lee, Choogon -- Kim, Tae-Kyung -- Takahashi, Joseph S -- F32 DA024556/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS053616/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Oct 19;338(6105):349-54. doi: 10.1126/science.1226339. Epub 2012 Aug 30.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Neuroscience, The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9111, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22936566" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: ARNTL Transcription Factors/metabolism ; Animals ; CLOCK Proteins/metabolism ; Chromatin/*metabolism ; Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly/genetics ; Circadian Clocks/*genetics ; Cryptochromes/*genetics ; DNA, Intergenic ; Enhancer Elements, Genetic ; *Epigenesis, Genetic ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Genetic Loci ; Histones/metabolism ; Liver/metabolism/*physiology ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Period Circadian Proteins/genetics ; RNA Polymerase II/metabolism ; RNA, Messenger/genetics ; *Transcription, Genetic ; *Transcriptional Activation
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2013-10-05
    Description: Graphene is a distinct two-dimensional material that offers a wide range of opportunities for membrane applications because of ultimate thinness, flexibility, chemical stability, and mechanical strength. We demonstrate that few- and several-layered graphene and graphene oxide (GO) sheets can be engineered to exhibit the desired gas separation characteristics. Selective gas diffusion can be achieved by controlling gas flow channels and pores via different stacking methods. For layered (3- to 10-nanometer) GO membranes, tunable gas transport behavior was strongly dependent on the degree of interlocking within the GO stacking structure. High carbon dioxide/nitrogen selectivity was achieved by well-interlocked GO membranes in high relative humidity, which is most suitable for postcombustion carbon dioxide capture processes, including a humidified feed stream.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kim, Hyo Won -- Yoon, Hee Wook -- Yoon, Seon-Mi -- Yoo, Byung Min -- Ahn, Byung Kook -- Cho, Young Hoon -- Shin, Hye Jin -- Yang, Hoichang -- Paik, Ungyu -- Kwon, Soongeun -- Choi, Jae-Young -- Park, Ho Bum -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Oct 4;342(6154):91-5. doi: 10.1126/science.1236098.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Energy Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133-791, Republic of Korea.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24092738" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2011-02-08
    Description: Geographic atrophy (GA), an untreatable advanced form of age-related macular degeneration, results from retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) cell degeneration. Here we show that the microRNA (miRNA)-processing enzyme DICER1 is reduced in the RPE of humans with GA, and that conditional ablation of Dicer1, but not seven other miRNA-processing enzymes, induces RPE degeneration in mice. DICER1 knockdown induces accumulation of Alu RNA in human RPE cells and Alu-like B1 and B2 RNAs in mouse RPE. Alu RNA is increased in the RPE of humans with GA, and this pathogenic RNA induces human RPE cytotoxicity and RPE degeneration in mice. Antisense oligonucleotides targeting Alu/B1/B2 RNAs prevent DICER1 depletion-induced RPE degeneration despite global miRNA downregulation. DICER1 degrades Alu RNA, and this digested Alu RNA cannot induce RPE degeneration in mice. These findings reveal a miRNA-independent cell survival function for DICER1 involving retrotransposon transcript degradation, show that Alu RNA can directly cause human pathology, and identify new targets for a major cause of blindness.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3077055/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3077055/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Kaneko, Hiroki -- Dridi, Sami -- Tarallo, Valeria -- Gelfand, Bradley D -- Fowler, Benjamin J -- Cho, Won Gil -- Kleinman, Mark E -- Ponicsan, Steven L -- Hauswirth, William W -- Chiodo, Vince A -- Kariko, Katalin -- Yoo, Jae Wook -- Lee, Dong-ki -- Hadziahmetovic, Majda -- Song, Ying -- Misra, Smita -- Chaudhuri, Gautam -- Buaas, Frank W -- Braun, Robert E -- Hinton, David R -- Zhang, Qing -- Grossniklaus, Hans E -- Provis, Jan M -- Madigan, Michele C -- Milam, Ann H -- Justice, Nikki L -- Albuquerque, Romulo J C -- Blandford, Alexander D -- Bogdanovich, Sasha -- Hirano, Yoshio -- Witta, Jassir -- Fuchs, Elaine -- Littman, Dan R -- Ambati, Balamurali K -- Rudin, Charles M -- Chong, Mark M W -- Provost, Patrick -- Kugel, Jennifer F -- Goodrich, James A -- Dunaief, Joshua L -- Baffi, Judit Z -- Ambati, Jayakrishna -- NIHU10EY013729/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- P30 EY006360/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- P30 EY014800/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- P30 EY014800-07/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- P30 EY021721/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- P30EY003040/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- P30EY008571/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- P30EY06360/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY018350/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY018350-05/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY018836/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY018836-04/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY020672/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 EY020672-02/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM068414/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01EY001545/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01EY011123/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01EY015240/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01EY015422/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01EY017182/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01EY017950/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01EY018350/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01EY018836/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01EY020672/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01GM068414/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01HD027215/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R21 EY019778/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R21 EY019778-02/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R21AI076757/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- R21EY019778/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- RC1 EY020442/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- RC1 EY020442-02/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- RC1EY020442/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- T32HL091812/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Mar 17;471(7338):325-30. doi: 10.1038/nature09830. Epub 2011 Feb 6.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky 40506, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21297615" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alu Elements/*genetics ; Animals ; Cell Death ; Cell Survival ; Cells, Cultured ; DEAD-box RNA Helicases/*deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Humans ; Macular Degeneration/*genetics/*pathology ; Mice ; MicroRNAs/metabolism ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Oligonucleotides, Antisense ; Phenotype ; RNA/*genetics/*metabolism ; Retinal Pigment Epithelium/enzymology/metabolism/pathology ; Ribonuclease III/*deficiency/genetics/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2011-07-15
    Description: Neurogenic transcription factors and evolutionarily conserved signalling pathways have been found to be instrumental in the formation of neurons. However, the instructive role of microRNAs (miRNAs) in neurogenesis remains unexplored. We recently discovered that miR-9* and miR-124 instruct compositional changes of SWI/SNF-like BAF chromatin-remodelling complexes, a process important for neuronal differentiation and function. Nearing mitotic exit of neural progenitors, miR-9* and miR-124 repress the BAF53a subunit of the neural-progenitor (np)BAF chromatin-remodelling complex. After mitotic exit, BAF53a is replaced by BAF53b, and BAF45a by BAF45b and BAF45c, which are then incorporated into neuron-specific (n)BAF complexes essential for post-mitotic functions. Because miR-9/9* and miR-124 also control multiple genes regulating neuronal differentiation and function, we proposed that these miRNAs might contribute to neuronal fates. Here we show that expression of miR-9/9* and miR-124 (miR-9/9*-124) in human fibroblasts induces their conversion into neurons, a process facilitated by NEUROD2. Further addition of neurogenic transcription factors ASCL1 and MYT1L enhances the rate of conversion and the maturation of the converted neurons, whereas expression of these transcription factors alone without miR-9/9*-124 was ineffective. These studies indicate that the genetic circuitry involving miR-9/9*-124 can have an instructive role in neural fate determination.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3348862/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3348862/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yoo, Andrew S -- Sun, Alfred X -- Li, Li -- Shcheglovitov, Aleksandr -- Portmann, Thomas -- Li, Yulong -- Lee-Messer, Chris -- Dolmetsch, Ricardo E -- Tsien, Richard W -- Crabtree, Gerald R -- AI060037/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- F30MH093125/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- GM58234/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- HD55391/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- MH064070/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- NS046789/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- NS24067/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD055391/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD055391-01A1/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD055391-02/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD055391-03/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD055391-04/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 HD055391-05/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS046789/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS046789-06/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS046789-07/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS046789-07S1/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS046789-08/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS046789-09/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS046789-09S1/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS046789-10/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Jul 13;476(7359):228-31. doi: 10.1038/nature10323.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Developmental Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305, USA. yooa@wustl.edu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21753754" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Basic Helix-Loop-Helix Transcription Factors/genetics/metabolism ; Biomarkers/analysis/metabolism ; Cell Differentiation/*genetics ; Cell Line ; Cell Lineage/genetics ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Excitatory Postsynaptic Potentials/physiology ; Fibroblasts/*cytology/*metabolism ; Humans ; Infant, Newborn ; MicroRNAs/*genetics/metabolism ; Microtubule-Associated Proteins/analysis/metabolism ; Nerve Tissue Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Neurons/*cytology/*metabolism ; Neuropeptides/genetics/metabolism ; Transcription Factors/genetics/metabolism ; Tubulin/analysis/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2012-02-24
    Description: Among the key properties that distinguish adult mammalian stem cells from their more differentiated progeny is the ability of stem cells to remain in a quiescent state for prolonged periods of time. However, the molecular pathways for the maintenance of stem-cell quiescence remain elusive. Here we use adult mouse muscle stem cells (satellite cells) as a model system and show that the microRNA (miRNA) pathway is essential for the maintenance of the quiescent state. Satellite cells that lack a functional miRNA pathway spontaneously exit quiescence and enter the cell cycle. We identified quiescence-specific miRNAs in the satellite-cell lineage by microarray analysis. Among these, miRNA-489 (miR-489) is highly expressed in quiescent satellite cells and is quickly downregulated during satellite-cell activation. Further analysis revealed that miR-489 functions as a regulator of satellite-cell quiescence, as it post-transcriptionally suppresses the oncogene Dek, the protein product of which localizes to the more differentiated daughter cell during asymmetric division of satellite cells and promotes the transient proliferative expansion of myogenic progenitors. Our results provide evidence of the miRNA pathway in general, and of a specific miRNA, miR-489, in actively maintaining the quiescent state of an adult stem-cell population.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3292200/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3292200/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Cheung, Tom H -- Quach, Navaline L -- Charville, Gregory W -- Liu, Ling -- Park, Lidia -- Edalati, Abdolhossein -- Yoo, Bryan -- Hoang, Phuong -- Rando, Thomas A -- DP1 OD000392/OD/NIH HHS/ -- DP1 OD000392-05/OD/NIH HHS/ -- F30 AG035521/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- P01 AG036695/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- P01 AG036695-01A1/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- P01AG036695/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG023806/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AG023806-05/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R01 AR056849/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AR056849-03/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AR062185/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 AR062185-01/AR/NIAMS NIH HHS/ -- R01AG23806/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- R37 AG023806/AG/NIA NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Feb 23;482(7386):524-8. doi: 10.1038/nature10834.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Paul F. Glenn Laboratories for the Biology of Aging, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California 94305, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22358842" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Cell Cycle/drug effects/*genetics ; Cell Differentiation/drug effects ; Cell Lineage/drug effects ; Cell Survival/drug effects/genetics ; DEAD-box RNA Helicases/genetics/metabolism ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics ; *Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; MicroRNAs/*genetics ; Myoblasts/*cytology/drug effects/*metabolism ; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis ; Oncogene Proteins/genetics ; Ribonuclease III/genetics/metabolism ; Satellite Cells, Skeletal Muscle/cytology/drug effects/metabolism ; Tamoxifen/pharmacology ; Transcription, Genetic/drug effects
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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