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  • 2000-2004  (3)
  • 1
    ISSN: 1365-2133
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Summary Background The yeast Malassezia is considered to be one of the factors that can contribute to atopic dermatitis (AD). Objectives To investigate the reactivity to Malassezia allergens, measured as specific serum IgE, positive skin prick test and positive atopy patch test (APT), in adult patients with AD. Methods In total, 132 adult patients with AD, 14 with seborrhoeic dermatitis (SD) and 33 healthy controls were investigated for their reactions to M. sympodialis extract and three recombinant Malassezia allergens (rMal s 1, rMal s 5 and rMal s 6). Results Sixty-seven per cent of the AD patients, but only one of the SD patients and none of the healthy controls, showed a positive reaction to at least one of the Malassezia allergens (extract and/or recombinant allergens) in at least one of the tests. The levels of M. sympodialis-specific IgE in serum correlated with the total serum IgE levels. Elevated serum levels of M. sympodialis-specific IgE were found in 55% and positive APT reactions in 41% of the AD patients with head and neck dermatitis. A relatively high proportion of patients without head and neck dermatitis and patients with low total serum IgE levels had a positive APT for M. sympodialis, despite lower proportions of individuals with M. sympodialis-specific IgE among these groups of patients. Conclusions These results support that Malassezia can play a role in eliciting and maintaining eczema in patients with AD. The addition of an APT to the test battery used in this study reveals a previously overlooked impact of Malassezia hypersensitivity in certain subgroups of AD patients.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Munksgaard International Publishers
    ISSN: 1600-051X
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Aim: The aim of present study was to evaluate if an enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain®) may enhance bone formation and osseointegration of titanium implants, using a well-documented rabbit model.Material and methods: Thirty-six threaded commercially pure titanium (cp.ti.) implants were inserted in six New Zealand white rabbits. One implant was placed in each femur and two in each tibia. Prior to implant insertion approximately 0.5 mL of Emdogain (EMD) (test) or the vehicle gel (PGA: propylene glycol alginate) (control) was injected into the surgically prepared implant site. The follow-up time was 6 weeks. Biomechanical evaluations by resonance frequency analysis (RFA) and removal torque measurements (RTQ) were performed. Histomorphometrical quantifications were made on ground sections by measurements of the percentage of bone-to-metal contact, bone area inside the threads as well as outside the threads (mirror image). Bone lengths along the implant surface were also measured and used for shear strength calculations.Results: The results demonstrated no beneficial effects from the EMD treatment on bone formation around titanium implants in any of the tested parameters. Significant differences were demonstrated with removal torque test and shear force calculations for the control implants. No other parameter demonstrated a statistically significant difference.Conclusion: The results of the present study may indicate that EMD does not contribute to bone formation around titanium implants. This observation may indicate that the bone formation that occurs after EMD treatment in periodontal defects is the result of functional adaptation. However, further research is required to evaluate the effect of EMD treatment on bone formation.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1365-2222
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Background The dust mite Lepidoglyphus destructor is an important cause of allergic reactions to dust, especially in farming environments. Two isoforms, recombinant (r)Lep d 2.01 and rLep d 2.02, of the major allergen Lep d 2, have previously been expressed as recombinant proteins. These isoforms differ 10.4% at the amino acid level. Furthermore, a mutant form of Lep d 2.01 (rLep d 2.6Cys) with a highly reduced IgE reactivity, has also been produced.Objective To investigate the T cell responses to the recombinant isoforms of Lep d 2, the Lep d 2.6Cys mutant and peptides of Lep d 2, in allergic and non-allergic individuals.Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 18 allergic and 16 non-allergic individuals were stimulated with the different antigens and the proliferative responses were measured. The cytokine production (interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and interferon (IFN)-γ) were measured by ELISA.Results Higher T cell proliferation was measured to isoform 01 than to 02 in 28/34 subjects. The responses to rLep d 2.6Cys were lower than to isoform 01 in most subjects, but higher than to Lep d 2.02. Two immuno-dominant peptides, corresponding to amino acid residue 11–25 and 61–75 were identified. The atopic subjects produced significantly lower IFN-γ in response to Lep d 2.01 as compared to the non-atopics.Conclusions There was a significant difference in T cell response between the two isoforms of rLep d 2. The hypoallergenic mutant rLep d 2.6Cys was able to evoke a T cell response with a magnitude which is between the two isoforms. Amino acid residue 11–25 and 61–75 are the most frequently recognized parts of Lep d 2 and are likely to contain the immuno-dominant T cell epitopes.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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