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  • 2000-2004  (2)
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  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Munksgaard International Publishers
    Allergy 58 (2003), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1398-9995
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Background:  The objective of the investigation was to explore in a prospective study the associations between dietary intake of fatty acids, antioxidants and hay fever manifestation in adulthood.Methods:  Three hundred and thirty-four hay fever cases with adult onset of clinical symptoms from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Heidelberg cohort were identified during follow-up and matched with 1336 controls. Dietary intake data were obtained by means of validated food frequency questionnaires. The influence of dietary fatty acid and vitamin intake on hay fever risk was estimated by means of unconditional logistic regression.Results:  High intake of oleic acid was positively associated with hay fever [odds ratio (OR): 2.86, 95% confidence intervals (95% CI): 1.22–6.70], whereas high intake of eicosapentaenoic acid was inversely related to hay fever (OR: 0.45, 95% CI: 0.22–0.93). Furthermore, high β-carotene intake increased the risk of hay fever (OR: 1.69, 95% CI: 1.09–2.63) while increasing intake of vitamin E was a protective factor (OR: 0.38, 95% CI: 0.17–0.85). In grouped analyses, the effects of β-carotene and vitamin E were mainly observed among women and ex-/current-smokers; in these subgroups, linoleic acid increased the risk of hay fever.Conclusions:  In conclusion, the present results provide further evidence that dietary factors might affect the risk of clinical manifestation of hay fever. However, the effects in smokers and women may suggest different biological mechanisms for the investigated nutrients, which need further research.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1365-2222
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Background Hayfever is determined by an interaction of environmental and genetic factors and biologically characterized by an imbalanced T helper cell 1 (Th1) and Th2 immune response and elevated IgE levels against inhalant allergens. Indications exist that polymorphisms in cytokine genes involved in the regulation of the Th1/Th2 balance may contribute to the allergic phenotype.Objective We investigate whether polymorphisms in genes directly or indirectly involved in Th1, Th2 immune response are associated with hayfever and elevated IgE levels against inhalant allergens.Methods From a subsample of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Heidelberg, 322 subjects with hayfever and 322 age- and sex-matched non-allergic controls were selected and genotypes determined for 15 polymorphisms in 13 genes. Plasma IgE against inhalant allergens was measured via CAPSX1 (Phadiatop) test. We computed odds ratios (ORs) by logistic regression, tests on group differences of IgE-levels in dependence upon genotype and tests for trend by means of non-parametric methods.Results We found decreased OR for hayfever (OR=0.60, 95%CI=0.4–0.9) and sensitization to inhalant antigens (OR=0.5, 95%CI=0.4–0.8) in heterozygotes of the IL-6 −174 G/C polymorphism. Homozygotes of the G-allele in IL-2 −330 T/G were at increased risk of hayfever (OR=2.6, 95%CI=1.3–5.2). Moreover, we found indications for differences in IgE levels against inhalant allergens in dependence upon genotypes of polymorphisms in IL-4R, IL-6, IL-13, and IL-18.Conclusion Our data suggest an association of genetic variants in IL-6 and IL-2 with hayfever, confirm a role of polymorphisms in IL-4R, IL-13, and IL-18 for the elevated IgE phenotype, and add IL-6 to the list of candidate genes.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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