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  • Cell & Developmental Biology  (38)
  • 1990-1994  (35)
  • 1945-1949  (1)
  • 1930-1934  (2)
  • 1
    ISSN: 1040-452X
    Keywords: Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1040-452X
    Keywords: Human sperm antigens ; Complement regulatory proteins ; Protectin CD59 ; Membrane attack complex ; Cell-to-cell adhesion ; Gametic interaction ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Protectin (CD59) is a complement regulatory protein which blocks the membrane attack complex during complement activation. CD59 was identifield on the human sperm surface by means of H19, an IgG1 anti-protectin mouse monoclonal antibody. Using Indirect immunofluorescence, flow cytometry and immunoperoxidase, CD59 was found to be present on the whole plasma membrane including the head and tail of fresh ejaculated, capacitated and acrosome-reacted spermatozoa. Immunoperoxidase staining of normal testicular sections indicated that this protein was already present on intraluminal germ cells. Analysis of this sperm protein by gel electrophoresis and immunoblotting revealed that its molecular weight of 20 kDa was comparable to that of CD59 expressed on peripheral blood cells (erythrocytes, lymphocytes) and that it was bound to the membrane through a glycophospholipid tail which could be released after treatment with phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C. Associated to membrane cofactor protein (CD46) and decay accelerating factor (CD55) located in the acrosomal membranes, CD59 may participate to the protection of male gametes against complement-mediated damage as they travel through the female genital tract. Moreover CD59, known as an adhesion molecule involved in lymphocyte rosettes, may also participate in cell to cell adhesion during gametic interaction since H19 inhibited sperm binding and reduced the penetration rate and index during the hamster egg penetration test. © 1994 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    Additional Material: 6 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    New York, NY : Wiley-Blackwell
    BioEssays 12 (1990), S. 389-395 
    ISSN: 0265-9247
    Keywords: Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: Although the segregation of mesenchyme into distinct aggregates is the first step in the development of a range of tissues that includes bones, somites, feathers and nephrons, we still know very little about the mechanisms by which this happens. There are two obvious types of explanation: first, that there are global pre-patterns within the mesenchyme whose molecular expression leads to tissue fragmentation and, second, that the condensations arise spontaneously through the local morphogenetic abilities of the cells. The only known mechanism for the latter possibility is cell traction and this paper suggests that current studies are compatible with traction playing a primary role in the formation of nephrogenic condensations in the developing kidney and the separation of somites, but not for the generation of feather rudiments where there is evidence of a prepattern of adhesivity.
    Additional Material: 5 Ill.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    ISSN: 0265-9247
    Keywords: Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    New York, N.Y. : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 51 (1993), S. 47-54 
    ISSN: 0730-2312
    Keywords: acetyl phosphate ; cross regulation ; phosphate control ; phosphorus metabolism ; protein phosphorylation ; two-component regulatory systems ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine
    Notes: The Escherichia coli phosphate (PHO) regulon includes 31 (or more) genes arranged in eight separate operons. All are coregulated by environmental (extra-cellular) phosphate and are probably involved in phosphorus assimilation. Pi control of these genes requires the sensor PhoR, the response regulator PhoB, the binding protein-dependent Pi-specific transporter Pst, and the accessory protein PhoU. During Pi limitation, PhoR turns on genes of the PHO regulon by phosphorylating PhoB that in turn activates transcription by binding to promoters that share an 18-base consensus PHO Box. When Pi is in excess, PhoR, Pst, and PhoU together turn off the PHO regulon, presumably by dephosphorylating PhoB. In addition, two Pi-independent controls that may be forms of cross regulation turn on the PHO regulon in the absence of PhoR. The sensor CreC, formerly called PhoM, phosphorylates PhoB in response to some (unknown) catabolite, while acetyl phosphate may directly phosphorylate PhoB. Cross regulation of the PHO regulon by CreC and acetyl phosphate may be examples of underlying control mechanisms important for the general (global) control of cell growth and metabolism. © 1993 Wiley-Liss, Inc.
    Additional Material: 4 Ill.
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  • 6
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    New York, N.Y. : Wiley-Blackwell
    Journal of Cellular Biochemistry 52 (1993), S. 289-296 
    ISSN: 0730-2312
    Keywords: endothelium ; wound repair ; basic fibroblast growth factor ; suramin ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine
    Notes: Monolayers of endothelial cells respond to physical denudation with a characteristic sequence of lamellipodia extrusion, cell migration, and cell proliferation. Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) has been implicated as a necessary component of this process: addition of exogenous bFGF enhances monolayer regeneration both in vitro and in vivo, and monolayer regeneration can be inhibited in vitro by treatment with neutralizing antibodies raised against bFGF. Centrosome reorientation from a random location to one preferentially situated between the nucleus and the denudation edge has been postulated as a mechanism essential for cell polarization and subsequent migration. This present study examined the effects of a polyclonal antibody to bFGF and suramin on monolayer regeneration, actin microfilament staining, and centrosome orientation at the wound edge of partially denuded bovine large vessel endothelial monolayers. Treatment with anti-bFGF or suramin abolished monolayer repair in these cultures. Cells at the denudation edge showed altered actin staining patterns and reduced lamellipodia extrusion, and there was complete inhibition of centrosome reorientation in treated cultures. Monolayer repair and centrosome reorientation could be restored by addition of exogenous bFGF in antibody but not suramin treated cultures. Recent evidence suggests that preferential centrosome location in migrating cells may be a consequence of lamellipodia protrusion and cell spreading, rather than an indication of cell polarization. However, these results indicate that agents which interfere with bFGF availability prevent endothelial monolayer regeneration via mechanisms involving cell spreading and/or centrosome reorientation.
    Additional Material: 5 Ill.
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  • 7
    ISSN: 0730-2312
    Keywords: oxidant stress ; nucleotides ; glutathione ; catalase ; redox state ; energy charge ; reactive oxygen species ; Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine
    Notes: Features of AIDS-related Kaposi's sarcoma (AIDS-KS), such as the multifocal presentation at mucosal and epidermal sites subjected to trauma, suggest that AIDS-KS is initially a reactive hyperplasia that subsequently progresses to a neoplasia. It is recognized that there is an association between sustained states and the subsequent development of neoplasia (e.g., ulcerative colitis/colonic adenocarcinoma). Furthermore, patients who develop AIDS-KS experience both a constant immune stimulation due to sustained high levelsof virus-induced cytokines and, because of a sparing effect on their phagoctic cells, retention of the phagocytic inflammatory response. A component of phygocytic activation is the initiation of the oxidative brust, resulting in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which can be mutagenic to host cells if released beyond the phagolysosome and not inactivated. Our results demonstrate that cultured AIDS-KS cells possess drcreased cytoprotective capabilities. Relativeto either dermal fibroblasts, or human microvascular endothelial cells (HMECs), AIDS-KS cells contained significantly lower levels of glutathione, a tripeptide integral in both cytoprotection and maintenance of cellular thiol status. While HMECs increased catalase activity during culture in the cytokine-rich KS milieu (control medium supplement with conditioned medium from MOT, an TLV II-infected cell line), AIDS-KS cells demonstrated reduced catalase function under these conditions. Furthermore, HMEC cultures showed in inherent biochemical responsiveness, by increasing catalase activity following exposure to exaogenous H2(O2). In contrast, the catalase activity of AIDS-KS cells decreased following (H2O2) challenge. Our results show that an inherent deficiency in cellular cytoprotection is present in AIDS-KS cells and suggest that oxidant stress may function in the development and progression AIDS-KS.
    Additional Material: 4 Ill.
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  • 8
    ISSN: 1040-452X
    Keywords: Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 9
    ISSN: 1040-452X
    Keywords: Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 10
    ISSN: 1040-452X
    Keywords: Life and Medical Sciences ; Cell & Developmental Biology
    Source: Wiley InterScience Backfile Collection 1832-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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