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  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 367 (1994), S. 691-692 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] SIR - Although male lactation is physiologically possible1, it is isolated and rare. It has been observed in domesticated mammals2'3 and in humans4'5, but it has not been reported in wild, free-ranging species. Here we report lactation by males in a population of Dayak fruit bats, Dyacopterus ...
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1520-6904
    Source: ACS Legacy Archives
    Topics: Chemistry and Pharmacology
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1432-1351
    Keywords: Chiroptera ; Muscle development ; Ontogeny of flight ; Postnatal growth ; Muscle histochemistry
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: Summary Postnatal changes in wing morphology, flight ability, muscle morphology, and histochemistry were investigated in the little brown bat, Myotis lucifugus. The pectoralis major, acromiodeltoideus, and quadriceps femoris muscles were examined using stains for myofibrillar ATPase, succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), and mitochondrial α-glycerophosphate dehydrogenase (α-GPDH) enzyme reactions. Bats first exhibited spontaneous, drop-evoked flapping behavior at 10 days, short horizontal flight at 17 days, and sustained flight at 24 days of age. Wing loading decreased and aspect ratio increased during postnatal development, each reaching adult range before the onset of sustained flight. Histochemically, fibers from the three muscles were undifferentiated at birth and had lower oxidative and glycolytic capacities compared to other age groups. Cross-sectional areas of fibers from the pectoralis and acromiodeltoideus muscles increased significantly at an age when dropevoked flapping behavior was first observed, suggesting that the neuromuscular mechanism controlling flapping did not develop until this time. Throughout the postnatal growth period, pectoralis and acromiodeltoideus muscle mass and fiber cross-sectional area increased significantly. By day 17 the pectoralis muscle had become differentiated in glycolytic capacity, as indicated by the mosaic staining pattern for α-GPDH. By contrast, the quadriceps fibers were relatively large at birth and slowly increased in size during the postnatal period. Fiber differentiation was evident at the time young bats began to fly, as indicated by a mosaic pattern of staining for myosin ATPase. These results indicate that flight muscles (pectoralis and acromiodeltoideus) are less well developed at birth and undergo rapid development just before the onset of flight. By contrast the quadriceps femoris muscle, which is required for postural control, is more developed at birth than the flight muscles and grows more slowly during subsequent development.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1573-7055
    Keywords: bats ; convergence ; tent architecture ; tent-making behavior
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract Fifteen species of neotropical and three species of paleotropical bats are known either to roost in or to make tents in over 80 species of vascular plants. We summarize the current knowledge of bat-tent architecture, report two new styles of tents (conical and apical) from the Paleotropics, compare the similarity in tents constructed, or used, by neotropical and paleotropical bats, and consider possible functions of tents. Seven styles of tents are known from the Neotropics, three (conical, palmate umbrella, and apical tents) are known from both the Neo- and the Paleotropics, and one (stem tent) is unique to the Paleotropics. In the Neotropics tent-roosting and/or tent-making appears to be a behavior unique to the diverse microchiropteran family Phyllostomidae (subfamily Phyllostomatinae: tribe Stenodermatini), and in the Paleotropics two members of the megachiropteran family Pteropodidae and one member of the microchiropteran family Vespertilionidae are known to construct or roost in tents. Despite the variety of plant taxa used by bats in tent construction, there appears to be a limited number of different leaf forms that can be altered by bats and used as tents. We suggest that the similarity in tent architecture observed among the neotropical and paleotropical bats is a consequence of convergence in leaf morphology among forest understory plants. The congruence in tent-making/roosting behavior observed in members of the Stenodermatini and the Pteropodidae (genusCynopterus) suggests a phylogenetic influence on these behaviors. The similarity in tent-making and/or tent-roosting behavior and life-history traits (small, 〈70 g, mostly foliage-roosting frugivores) among these divergent neotropical and paleotropical taxa supports a convergence hypothesis in which members of these groups have become ecological equivalents. Although actual tent-making has been observed in only one bat species to date, we suggest that the principal selective force leading to the evolution of tent-making is a polygynous mating system whereby males construct tents to gain access to females. Tents in turn provide resources that offer protection from predators and inclement weather.
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