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  • Articles  (8)
  • Blackwell Publishing Ltd  (8)
  • 1995-1999  (2)
  • 1985-1989  (6)
  • 1910-1914
  • 1
    ISSN: 1745-4573
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Precooked, small-portion, microwave-reheatable steaks were processed from three grades (US Choice, US Select+, and US Select-) of top round beef. Marinated/tenderized samples were compared to nonmarinated/nontenderized controls from each grade. Untrained consumers (n=102) rated the sensory attributes, overall acceptability, and willingness to purchase the steaks at various settings (fast food, restaurant/cafeteria, supermarket). Marination and tenderization improved the sensory attributes, overall acceptability, and consumers' willingness to purchase the steaks, regardless of the grade from which they were prepared. Marinated/tenderized steaks from the US Select grade were more acceptable than nonmarinated/nontenderized steaks from the US Choice grade. Marinated/tenderized steaks from each grade required less force and energy to cut, contained about 3% more moisture and 0.5% less fat, and had more cooking loss than their control counterparts. However, consumers rated the marinated/tenderized products as being more tender, juicy, flavorful and more acceptable overall than controls.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Journal of food quality 9 (1986), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1745-4557
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Three experiments were conducted to determine effects of autolyzed yeast on frankfurter firmness, flavor, and yields. Smokehouse yields of laboratory prepared frankfurters (Experiment #1) were not affected (P 〈 0.05) by addition of autolyzed yeast (1%). Commercially produced frankfurters containing 0%, 1.0%, or 1.5% yeast (Experiment #2) or 0%, 0.75% or 1.0% yeast (Experiment #3) were subjected to sensory and yield evaluations. Frankfurters from Experiment #2, with 1% autolyzed yeast were more firm (P 〈 .10) than control frankfurters. Frankfurters from Experiment #3 with 0.75% and 1.0% autolyzed yeast were more firm (P 〈 .01, P 〈 .10) than controls. Vacuum packaged frankfurters containing yeast (Experiments #2 and #3), held 2, 4, or 6 weeks at 2–5°C, had less purge than their respective controls. Autolyzed yeast appeaers to enhance frankfurter flavor and firmness while reducing purge in vacuum packaged product.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1745-4557
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: The chemical, cooking and physical properties of semimembranosus, semitendinosus and biceps femoris of ham were determined. Significant differences in fat content of muscle and force required to penetrate the ham samples from the three muscles were found. No significant differences among three muscles in other properties were noted. A statistically significant correlation (r=-0.54) existed between the fat content of muscle and force required to penetrate the ham sample. Expressible juice from the muscles was significantly related to the cook loss and yield of hams. The moisture content of hams was also negatively related to the expressible juice. The possible mechanisms for these correlations are related to the ability of porcine muscles to chemically bind moisture during the cooking processes.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1745-4557
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: The effects of soluble and insoluble components of beef skeletal muscle were examined by incorporating these fractions into batters made from beef heart and beef skeletal muscle and measuring the stability of these batters. In both types of batters, the homogenate residues promoted stability. Removal of salt from these residues decreased or removed their ability to stabilize the meat batters.
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  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Journal of food quality 12 (1989), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1745-4557
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: A smoked sausage product was made by incorporating mechanically deboned poultry meat (MDPM) without skin in combination with a 3:1 pork:beef mixture. The ratio of MDPM to pork:beef was 10:90, 30:70, 50:50 and 70:30. Effects of preblending the meat components 24 h prior to mixing and stuffing were also studied. The sausages were evaluated for proximate composition, cook yield and sensory acceptability. As the level of MDPM increased objective and sensory textural attributes of cohesiveness increased (P 〈 0.05) while firmness decreased. Preblending increased the firmness and chewiness of smoked sausages (P 〈 0.05). Sausages in all treatment combinations were well accepted by the sensory panelists, with a score of 6.9 or higher for overall reaction on a scale from 0 to 10, 10 being the most desirable.
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  • 6
    ISSN: 1745-4557
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: The effects of sodium tripolyphosphate and type of non-meat protein binders on the quality of smoked sausage produced from mechanically deboned poultry meat (MDPM) without skin were studied. Higher cook yields were observed in sausages containing soy protein isolate, soy protein concentrate and sodium caseinate (P 〈 0.05). Addition of sodium tripolyphosphate, with or without non-meat protein binder, also increased cook yields (P 〈 0.05). Objective and sensory textural attributes of firmness, chewiness and springiness were not affected by type of binder, but incorporation of phosphate increased sausage firmness. All chicken sausage treatments were considered acceptable by the sensory panel.
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  • 7
    ISSN: 1750-3841
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Restructured hams were made from modified food starch (MFS), kappa-carrageenan (k-c), isolated soy protein (ISP), and processed with different levels of PSE pork [100% Normal, 50% PSE/50% Normal, 100% PSE]. Hams were ground, tumbled for 2h with a brine, stuffed, and water cooked. Bind strength values decreased and expressible moisture increased with addition of PSE pork to the ISP and k-c treatments. Incorporation of MFS decreased bind strength and expressible moisture and increased yields in the 100P treatment. Results indicated MFS enhanced the water retention of PSE pork in a restructured product.
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  • 8
    ISSN: 1750-3841
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Ingredients used in comminuted meat products were divided into four classes: Class I–striated, skeletal muscle meats; Class II – striated, nonskeletal muscle meat; Class III – organ and smooth muscle meats; and Class IV – nonmeat proteins. Within this classification scheme, bind value constants developed by different workers were subjected to regression anaylsis using protein or moisture as the independent variable. Linear or multiple regression equations with high correlation coefficients were obtained for Class I and Class III meats indicating reliable predictive value of moisture or protein content. These equations should prove useful for esimating bind value constants for meat ingredients in these classes for which such constants have not been established by experimental procedures.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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