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  • 1985-1989  (2)
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  • 1
    ISSN: 1432-1955
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: Abstract Mature calcareous corpuscles in the juvenile (stomach) worms of Trilocularia acanthiaevulgaris comprise a number of concentric lamellae interspersed with areas of flocculent material. Each lamella is composed of a pair of membranous rings to which amorphous, non-crystalline material is attached. The process of corpuscle formation is intracellular, beginning with the autophagic breakdown of the cytoplasm to produce a central vacuole within a parenchymal cell. The vacuole enlarges until only a thin layer of cytoplasm remains at the periphery and the nucleus is displaced to one end of the cell. Paired, concentrically arranged membranes are laid down beneath the peripheral cytoplasmic layer and eventually occlude the central vacuole. X-ray analysis of the corpuscles indicates the presence of calcium, phosphorus, sulphur, zinc and molybdenum, with the major peaks representing calcium, phosphorus and sulphur. Calcium appears to be bound to the lamellae rather than associated with the material between lamellae. The possible functions of the corpuscles are discussed in relation to the biology of T. acanthiaevulgaris and its developmental sequence in the dogfish gut.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1432-1955
    Source: Springer Online Journal Archives 1860-2000
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
    Notes: Abstract The ultrastructure of the scolex glands ofTrilocularia acanthiaevulgaris is described with the aid of transmission electron microscopy. The syncytial scolex gland cells exhibit an ultrastructure which is typical of secretory cells, in that they contain extensive and distended cisternae of granular endoplasmic reticulum (GER), numerous Golgi complexes and secretory vesicles. The vesicles are transported via microtubule-lined ducts to the apex of the scolex where they are released from the tegumental surface by an eccrine process. The secretion is often accumulated in reservoirs created by a lateral swelling of the ducts. Cytochemical studies show that the secretion has a glycoprotein nature. It is suggested that the secretion probably acts as an adhesive, aiding attachment of the worm to the host mucosa. This may be more important in juvenile worms which have less well-developed scoleces.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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