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  • Articles  (3)
  • Blackwell Publishing Ltd  (3)
  • 1995-1999  (2)
  • 1960-1964  (1)
  • 1910-1914
  • 1
    ISSN: 1745-4573
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Precooked, small-portion, microwave-reheatable steaks were processed from three grades (US Choice, US Select+, and US Select-) of top round beef. Marinated/tenderized samples were compared to nonmarinated/nontenderized controls from each grade. Untrained consumers (n=102) rated the sensory attributes, overall acceptability, and willingness to purchase the steaks at various settings (fast food, restaurant/cafeteria, supermarket). Marination and tenderization improved the sensory attributes, overall acceptability, and consumers' willingness to purchase the steaks, regardless of the grade from which they were prepared. Marinated/tenderized steaks from the US Select grade were more acceptable than nonmarinated/nontenderized steaks from the US Choice grade. Marinated/tenderized steaks from each grade required less force and energy to cut, contained about 3% more moisture and 0.5% less fat, and had more cooking loss than their control counterparts. However, consumers rated the marinated/tenderized products as being more tender, juicy, flavorful and more acceptable overall than controls.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Journal of food science 29 (1964), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1750-3841
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: A simple method was developed for estimating the emulsifying capacity of protein extracts. Several variables influenced the amount of oil that could be emulsified by 1 mg of soluble protein. The amount of soluble protein in the original aliquot used, the speed of mixing, the final temperature of the emulsion, and the amount of oil initially added, each influenced the emulsifying capacity of the soluble protein. The rate of addition of oil did not affect the amount of oil emulsified. Any differences in the effect of rate of addition of oil could be attributed to a temperature difference. Photomicrographs were made of emulsions showing the protein-oil relationship at increasing amounts of oil before and after emulsion breakdown. A method for predicting the stability of emulsions was used to verify the method developed.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1750-3841
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Restructured hams were made from modified food starch (MFS), kappa-carrageenan (k-c), isolated soy protein (ISP), and processed with different levels of PSE pork [100% Normal, 50% PSE/50% Normal, 100% PSE]. Hams were ground, tumbled for 2h with a brine, stuffed, and water cooked. Bind strength values decreased and expressible moisture increased with addition of PSE pork to the ISP and k-c treatments. Incorporation of MFS decreased bind strength and expressible moisture and increased yields in the 100P treatment. Results indicated MFS enhanced the water retention of PSE pork in a restructured product.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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