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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2011-04-09
    Description: Hierarchical triple systems comprise a close binary and a more distant component. They are important for testing theories of star formation and of stellar evolution in the presence of nearby companions. We obtained 218 days of Kepler photometry of HD 181068 (magnitude of 7.1), supplemented by ground-based spectroscopy and interferometry, which show it to be a hierarchical triple with two types of mutual eclipses. The primary is a red giant that is in a 45-day orbit with a pair of red dwarfs in a close 0.9-day orbit. The red giant shows evidence for tidally induced oscillations that are driven by the orbital motion of the close pair. HD 181068 is an ideal target for studies of dynamical evolution and testing tidal friction theories in hierarchical triple systems.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Derekas, A -- Kiss, L L -- Borkovits, T -- Huber, D -- Lehmann, H -- Southworth, J -- Bedding, T R -- Balam, D -- Hartmann, M -- Hrudkova, M -- Ireland, M J -- Kovacs, J -- Mezo, Gy -- Moor, A -- Niemczura, E -- Sarty, G E -- Szabo, Gy M -- Szabo, R -- Telting, J H -- Tkachenko, A -- Uytterhoeven, K -- Benko, J M -- Bryson, S T -- Maestro, V -- Simon, A E -- Stello, D -- Schaefer, G -- Aerts, C -- ten Brummelaar, T A -- De Cat, P -- McAlister, H A -- Maceroni, C -- Merand, A -- Still, M -- Sturmann, J -- Sturmann, L -- Turner, N -- Tuthill, P G -- Christensen-Dalsgaard, J -- Gilliland, R L -- Kjeldsen, H -- Quintana, E V -- Tenenbaum, P -- Twicken, J D -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Apr 8;332(6026):216-8. doi: 10.1126/science.1201762.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Astronomy, Eotvos University, Budapest, Hungary. derekas@konkoly.hu〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21474755" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2012-07-24
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Gitler, Aaron D -- Lehmann, Ruth -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Jul 20;337(6092):269. doi: 10.1126/science.1227179.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22822114" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Disease/*genetics ; *Disease Models, Animal ; Genes/*physiology ; Genetics, Medical/*trends ; Humans ; Sequence Analysis, DNA/*trends
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2014-02-01
    Description: Ecologists have long sought to understand the factors controlling the structure of savanna vegetation. Using data from 2154 sites in savannas across Africa, Australia, and South America, we found that increasing moisture availability drives increases in fire and tree basal area, whereas fire reduces tree basal area. However, among continents, the magnitude of these effects varied substantially, so that a single model cannot adequately represent savanna woody biomass across these regions. Historical and environmental differences drive the regional variation in the functional relationships between woody vegetation, fire, and climate. These same differences will determine the regional responses of vegetation to future climates, with implications for global carbon stocks.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lehmann, Caroline E R -- Anderson, T Michael -- Sankaran, Mahesh -- Higgins, Steven I -- Archibald, Sally -- Hoffmann, William A -- Hanan, Niall P -- Williams, Richard J -- Fensham, Roderick J -- Felfili, Jeanine -- Hutley, Lindsay B -- Ratnam, Jayashree -- San Jose, Jose -- Montes, Ruben -- Franklin, Don -- Russell-Smith, Jeremy -- Ryan, Casey M -- Durigan, Giselda -- Hiernaux, Pierre -- Haidar, Ricardo -- Bowman, David M J S -- Bond, William J -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Jan 31;343(6170):548-52. doi: 10.1126/science.1247355.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University, New South Wales 2109, Australia.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24482480" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Africa ; Australia ; *Climate ; *Ecosystem ; *Fires ; Humidity ; Models, Biological ; South America ; *Trees
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2015-03-15
    Description: Small-molecule synthesis usually relies on procedures that are highly customized for each target. A broadly applicable automated process could greatly increase the accessibility of this class of compounds to enable investigations of their practical potential. Here we report the synthesis of 14 distinct classes of small molecules using the same fully automated process. This was achieved by strategically expanding the scope of a building block-based synthesis platform to include even C(sp3)-rich polycyclic natural product frameworks and discovering a catch-and-release chromatographic purification protocol applicable to all of the corresponding intermediates. With thousands of compatible building blocks already commercially available, many small molecules are now accessible with this platform. More broadly, these findings illuminate an actionable roadmap to a more general and automated approach for small-molecule synthesis.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4687482/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4687482/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Li, Junqi -- Ballmer, Steven G -- Gillis, Eric P -- Fujii, Seiko -- Schmidt, Michael J -- Palazzolo, Andrea M E -- Lehmann, Jonathan W -- Morehouse, Greg F -- Burke, Martin D -- GM080436/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- GM090153/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM080436/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM090153/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Mar 13;347(6227):1221-6. doi: 10.1126/science.aaa5414.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI), Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. mdburke@illinois.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25766227" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Automation ; Boronic Acids/chemistry ; Chemistry Techniques, Synthetic/instrumentation/*methods ; Cyclization ; Molecular Structure ; Organic Chemicals/*chemical synthesis/chemistry/isolation & purification
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    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2015-03-15
    Description: Rapid warming in the Arctic could influence mid-latitude circulation by reducing the poleward temperature gradient. The largest changes are generally expected in autumn or winter, but whether significant changes have occurred is debated. Here we report significant weakening of summer circulation detected in three key dynamical quantities: (i) the zonal-mean zonal wind, (ii) the eddy kinetic energy (EKE), and (iii) the amplitude of fast-moving Rossby waves. Weakening of the zonal wind is explained by a reduction in the poleward temperature gradient. Changes in Rossby waves and EKE are consistent with regression analyses of climate model projections and changes over the seasonal cycle. Monthly heat extremes are associated with low EKE, and thus the observed weakening might have contributed to more persistent heat waves in recent summers.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Coumou, Dim -- Lehmann, Jascha -- Beckmann, Johanna -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Apr 17;348(6232):324-7. doi: 10.1126/science.1261768. Epub 2015 Mar 12.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Earth System Analysis, 14412 Potsdam, Germany. coumou@pik-potsdam.de. ; Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, Earth System Analysis, 14412 Potsdam, Germany. University of Potsdam, Potsdam, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25765067" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
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    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2016-05-21
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Berg, Jeremy M -- Bhalla, Needhi -- Bourne, Philip E -- Chalfie, Martin -- Drubin, David G -- Fraser, James S -- Greider, Carol W -- Hendricks, Michael -- Jones, Chonnettia -- Kiley, Robert -- King, Susan -- Kirschner, Marc W -- Krumholz, Harlan M -- Lehmann, Ruth -- Leptin, Maria -- Pulverer, Bernd -- Rosenzweig, Brooke -- Spiro, John E -- Stebbins, Michael -- Strasser, Carly -- Swaminathan, Sowmya -- Turner, Paul -- Vale, Ronald D -- VijayRaghavan, K -- Wolberger, Cynthia -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2016 May 20;352(6288):899-901. doi: 10.1126/science.aaf9133.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Institute of Personalized Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine. ; Department of Molecular, Cell and Developmental Biology, University of California, Santa Cruz. ; Office of the Director, National Institutes of Health. ; Department of Biological Sciences, Columbia University. ; Department of Molecular and Cell Biology, University of California, Berkeley. ; Department of Bioengineering and Therapeutic Sciences, University of California San Francisco. ; Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. ; Department of Biology, McGill University. ; Wellcome Trust. ; Rockefeller University Press. ; Department of Systems Biology, Harvard Medical School. ; Yale School of Medicine, Yale University. ; Kimmel Center for Biology and Medicine of the Skirball Institute, Department of Cell Biology, New York University School of Medicine. ; European Molecular Biology Organization. ; The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust. ; Simons Foundation. ; Laura and John Arnold Foundation. ; Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation. ; Nature Research Group. ; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University. ; Howard Hughes Medical Institute and Department of Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology, University of California San Francisco. ron.vale@ucsf.edu. ; Department of Biotechnology, Ministry of Science and Technology, Government of India. ; Department of Biophysics and Biophysical Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27199406" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-05-01
    Description: Background/Aim: Genomic signatures are needed for the determination of prognosis in patients with early stage, estrogen receptor (ER)-positive, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative breast cancers. EndoPredict test is a RNA-based multigene assay that assesses the risk of 10-year relapse in this context. Quality assessment is a mandatory requirement for a laboratory to address the analytical quality of these molecular analyses. The aim of the study was to demonstrate the robustness of this prognostic test, its usefulness for the patient's treatment strategy, at the national level. Materials and Methods: This study presents a pilot quality assessment (QA) of the EndoPredict test using composite design, including the follow-up of internal control values (qREF) of the 12 genes of the assay for 151 independent tests and one formalin-fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) breast cancer sample. The evaluation of the test was performed by comparing the results of six independent medical laboratories. Results: All measures were highly reproducible and quantification of the qREF showed a standard deviation of less than 0.50 and a coefficient of variation always of 〈2%. All laboratories found concordant results for the breast cancer samples. The mean EndoPredict (EP) score for the breast cancer sample was 4.97±0.24. The mean of EPclin score was 3.07±0.05. Conclusion: This first French independent reported QA assessed the robustness and reproducibility of the EndoPredict test. Such a simple composite design could represent an adapted QA for an expensive diagnostic test.
    Print ISSN: 0250-7005
    Electronic ISSN: 1791-7530
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2018-03-06
    Description: Background: The prognostic and predictive role of cyclo-oxygenase-2 (COX2) in breast cancer is still debated, and in particular, its role as a target of COX2 inhibitor (celecoxib) in neoadjuvant setting. Materials and Methods: We analyzed a series of 156 breast cancer samples from patients of the COX2 inhibitor-treated arm included in the REMAGUS-02 randomized phase II trial. COX2 gene expression was assessed by reverse transcription and quantitative polymerase chain reaction using ribonucleic acid from frozen biopsies. Pathological complete response (pCR) was the surrogate end-point. Results: Significantly higher rates of grade 3, and estrogen and progesterone receptor negativity were observed in tumors with the highest expression of COX2. pCR rates were significantly higher in COX2-overexpressing tumors in patients receiving celecoxib. The test for interaction between COX2 gene expression and the celecoxib effect was statistically significant (p〈0.01), but was not retained in the multivariate analysis. Conclusion: COX2 overexpression is predictive of pCR in patients with celecoxib-treated tumors. The efficacy of celecoxib in breast cancer might be improved by quantification of COX2 gene expression.
    Print ISSN: 0250-7005
    Electronic ISSN: 1791-7530
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 9
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    The International Institute of Anticancer Research (IIAR)
    Publication Date: 2018-01-28
    Description: Ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA lesions are almost exclusively removed by the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway, which is essential for prevention of skin cancer development. Patients with xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) are extremely sun sensitive due to a genetic defect in components of the NER cascade. They present with first signs of premature skin aging at an early age, with a considerably increased risk of developing UV-induced skin cancer. XP belongs to the group of DNA repair defective disorders that are mainly diagnosed in the clinic and in hindsight confirmed at the molecular level. Unfortunately, there are no causative treatment options for this rare, autosomal-recessive disorder, emphasizing the importance of an early diagnosis. Subsequently, UV-protective measures such as the reduction of exposure to environmental UV and regular skin cancer screenings should be undertaken to substantially improve prognosis as well as the disease course.
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    Electronic ISSN: 1791-7530
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 10
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    The International Institute of Anticancer Research (IIAR)
    Publication Date: 2018-01-28
    Description: UV radiation is acknowledged as the primary cause of photocarcinogenesis and therefore contributes to the development of skin cancer entities such as squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), and melanoma. Typical DNA photoproducts and indirect DNA damage caused by reactive oxygen species are the result of UV radiation. UV-induced DNA damage is repaired by nucleotide excision repair, which consequently counteracts the development of mutations and skin carcinogenesis. Tumour-suppressor genes are inactivated by mutation and growth-promoting pathways are activated leading to disruption of cell-cycle progression. Depending on the skin cancer entity, some genes are more frequently affected than others. In BCC mutations in Patched or Smoothened are common and affect the Sonic hedgehog pathway. In SCC, cell regulator protein p53 (TP53) mutations are prevalent, as well as mutations of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), cyclin-dependent kinase 2A (CDKN2A), Rat sarcoma (RAS), or the tyrosine kinase Fyn (FYN). UV-induced mutations in TP53 and CDKN2A are frequent in melanoma. UV-induced inflammatory processes also facilitate photocarcinogenesis. Recent studies showed a connection between photocarcinogenesis and citrus consumption, phytochemicals, alcohol consumption, hormone replacement therapy, as well as oral contraceptive use. Preventative measures include adequate use of sun protection and skin cancer screening at regular intervals, as well as the use of chemopreventative agents.
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    Electronic ISSN: 1791-7530
    Topics: Medicine
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