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  • American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)  (11)
  • 1
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    Publication Date: 2018-11-10
    Description: Quantum spin liquids (QSLs) are exotic phases of matter that host fractionalized excitations. It is difficult for local probes to characterize QSL, whereas quantum entanglement can serve as a powerful diagnostic tool due to its nonlocality. The kagome antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model is one of the most studied and experimentally relevant models for QSL, but its solution remains under debate. Here, we perform a numerical Aharonov-Bohm experiment on this model and uncover universal features of the entanglement entropy. By means of the density matrix renormalization group, we reveal the entanglement signatures of emergent Dirac spinons, which are the fractionalized excitations of the QSL. This scheme provides qualitative insights into the nature of kagome QSL and can be used to study other quantum states of matter. As a concrete example, we also benchmark our methods on an interacting quantum critical point between a Dirac semimetal and a charge-ordered phase.
    Electronic ISSN: 2375-2548
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-10-05
    Description: Electron-boson coupling plays a key role in superconductivity for many systems. However, in copper-based high–critical temperature ( T c ) superconductors, its relation to superconductivity remains controversial despite strong spectroscopic fingerprints. In this study, we used angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy to find a pronounced correlation between the superconducting gap and the bosonic coupling strength near the Brillouin zone boundary in Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+ . The bosonic coupling strength rapidly increases from the overdoped Fermi liquid regime to the optimally doped strange metal, concomitant with the quadrupled superconducting gap and the doubled gap-to- T c ratio across the pseudogap boundary. This synchronized lattice and electronic response suggests that the effects of electronic interaction and the electron-phonon coupling (EPC) reinforce each other in a positive-feedback loop upon entering the strange-metal regime, which in turn drives a stronger superconductivity.
    Keywords: Physics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2011-07-02
    Description: The proteins encoded by ATRX and DAXX participate in chromatin remodeling at telomeres and other genomic sites. Because inactivating mutations of these genes are common in human pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs), we examined the telomere status of these tumors. We found that 61% of PanNETs displayed abnormal telomeres that are characteristic of a telomerase-independent telomere maintenance mechanism termed ALT (alternative lengthening of telomeres). All of the PanNETs exhibiting these abnormal telomeres had ATRX or DAXX mutations or loss of nuclear ATRX or DAXX protein. ATRX mutations also correlate with abnormal telomeres in tumors of the central nervous system. These data suggest that an alternative telomere maintenance function may operate in human tumors with alterations in the ATRX or DAXX genes.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3174141/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3174141/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Heaphy, Christopher M -- de Wilde, Roeland F -- Jiao, Yuchen -- Klein, Alison P -- Edil, Barish H -- Shi, Chanjuan -- Bettegowda, Chetan -- Rodriguez, Fausto J -- Eberhart, Charles G -- Hebbar, Sachidanand -- Offerhaus, G Johan -- McLendon, Roger -- Rasheed, B Ahmed -- He, Yiping -- Yan, Hai -- Bigner, Darell D -- Oba-Shinjo, Sueli Mieko -- Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi -- Riggins, Gregory J -- Kinzler, Kenneth W -- Vogelstein, Bert -- Hruban, Ralph H -- Maitra, Anirban -- Papadopoulos, Nickolas -- Meeker, Alan K -- P01 CA134292/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA134292-01A1/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA062924/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 CA062924-06/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P50 NS020023/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- P50 NS020023-28/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA113669/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA113669-06/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA121113/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA121113-01/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA140316/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA140316-01A1/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS055089/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS055089-01A2/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R37 CA011898/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R37 CA011898-41/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jul 22;333(6041):425. doi: 10.1126/science.1207313. Epub 2011 Jun 30.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Pathology, Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21719641" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/*genetics/metabolism ; Carcinoma, Neuroendocrine/*genetics/pathology/physiopathology ; Cell Nucleus/metabolism ; Central Nervous System Neoplasms/*genetics/pathology/physiopathology ; Chromatin Assembly and Disassembly ; DNA Helicases/*genetics/metabolism ; Humans ; In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence ; Mutant Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Mutation ; Nuclear Proteins/*genetics/metabolism ; Pancreatic Neoplasms/*genetics/pathology/physiopathology ; Phenotype ; Telomere/*physiology/ultrastructure
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2013-09-21
    Description: Opioid receptor antagonists increase hyperalgesia in humans and animals, which indicates that endogenous activation of opioid receptors provides relief from acute pain; however, the mechanisms of long-term opioid inhibition of pathological pain have remained elusive. We found that tissue injury produced mu-opioid receptor (MOR) constitutive activity (MOR(CA)) that repressed spinal nociceptive signaling for months. Pharmacological blockade during the posthyperalgesia state with MOR inverse agonists reinstated central pain sensitization and precipitated hallmarks of opioid withdrawal (including adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate overshoot and hyperalgesia) that required N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation of adenylyl cyclase type 1. Thus, MOR(CA) initiates both analgesic signaling and a compensatory opponent process that generates endogenous opioid dependence. Tonic MOR(CA) suppression of withdrawal hyperalgesia may prevent the transition from acute to chronic pain.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4440417/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4440417/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Corder, G -- Doolen, S -- Donahue, R R -- Winter, M K -- Jutras, B L -- He, Y -- Hu, X -- Wieskopf, J S -- Mogil, J S -- Storm, D R -- Wang, Z J -- McCarson, K E -- Taylor, B K -- 5K02DA19656/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- F31 DA032496/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- F31DA032496/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- HD02528/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- K02 DA019656/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- P30 HD002528/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS045954/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01NS45954/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- UL1 TR000117/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Sep 20;341(6152):1394-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1239403.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Physiology, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY 40536, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24052307" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Acute Pain/metabolism ; Adenosine Monophosphate/metabolism ; Adenylyl Cyclases/metabolism ; Animals ; Chronic Pain/*metabolism ; Disease Models, Animal ; Freund's Adjuvant/pharmacology ; Hyperalgesia/chemically induced/*metabolism ; Isoflurane/pharmacology ; Male ; Mice ; Naltrexone/analogs & derivatives/pharmacology ; Nociceptive Pain/*metabolism ; Receptors, N-Methyl-D-Aspartate/metabolism ; Receptors, Opioid, mu/agonists/antagonists & inhibitors/*metabolism ; Spinal Cord/drug effects/metabolism ; Substance Withdrawal Syndrome/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2014-05-09
    Description: The unclear relationship between cuprate superconductivity and the pseudogap state remains an impediment to understanding the high transition temperature (T(c)) superconducting mechanism. Here, we used magnetic field-dependent scanning tunneling microscopy to provide phase-sensitive proof that d-wave superconductivity coexists with the pseudogap on the antinodal Fermi surface of an overdoped cuprate. Furthermore, by tracking the hole-doping (p) dependence of the quasi-particle interference pattern within a single bismuth-based cuprate family, we observed a Fermi surface reconstruction slightly below optimal doping, indicating a zero-field quantum phase transition in notable proximity to the maximum superconducting T(c). Surprisingly, this major reorganization of the system's underlying electronic structure has no effect on the smoothly evolving pseudogap.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉He, Yang -- Yin, Yi -- Zech, M -- Soumyanarayanan, Anjan -- Yee, Michael M -- Williams, Tess -- Boyer, M C -- Chatterjee, Kamalesh -- Wise, W D -- Zeljkovic, I -- Kondo, Takeshi -- Takeuchi, T -- Ikuta, H -- Mistark, Peter -- Markiewicz, Robert S -- Bansil, Arun -- Sachdev, Subir -- Hudson, E W -- Hoffman, J E -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 May 9;344(6184):608-11. doi: 10.1126/science.1248221.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24812396" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
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    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2015-07-15
    Description: Insulin-induced gene 1 (Insig-1) and Insig-2 are endoplasmic reticulum membrane-embedded sterol sensors that regulate the cellular accumulation of sterols. Despite their physiological importance, the structural information on Insigs remains limited. Here we report the high-resolution structures of MvINS, an Insig homolog from Mycobacterium vanbaalenii. MvINS exists as a homotrimer. Each protomer comprises six transmembrane segments (TMs), with TM3 and TM4 contributing to homotrimerization. The six TMs enclose a V-shaped cavity that can accommodate a diacylglycerol molecule. A homology-based structural model of human Insig-2, together with biochemical characterizations, suggest that the central cavity of Insig-2 accommodates 25-hydroxycholesterol, whereas TM3 and TM4 engage in Scap binding. These analyses provide an important framework for further functional and mechanistic understanding of Insig proteins and the sterol regulatory element-binding protein pathway.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4704858/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4704858/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ren, Ruobing -- Zhou, Xinhui -- He, Yuan -- Ke, Meng -- Wu, Jianping -- Liu, Xiaohui -- Yan, Chuangye -- Wu, Yixuan -- Gong, Xin -- Lei, Xiaoguang -- Yan, S Frank -- Radhakrishnan, Arun -- Yan, Nieng -- HL-20948/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- P01 HL020948/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Jul 10;349(6244):187-91. doi: 10.1126/science.aab1091.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉State Key Laboratory of Membrane Biology, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. Center for Structural Biology, School of Life Sciences, School of Medicine, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. Tsinghua-Peking Center for Life Sciences, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; National Institute of Biological Sciences, Beijing 102206, China. ; Molecular Design and Chemical Biology, Therapeutic Modalities, Roche Pharma Research and Early Development, Roche Innovation Center Shanghai, Shanghai 201203, China. ; Department of Molecular Genetics, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, TX 75390-9046, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26160948" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Bacterial Proteins/*chemistry ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Diglycerides/chemistry ; Humans ; Hydroxycholesterols/chemistry/*metabolism ; Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/*chemistry ; Membrane Proteins/*chemistry ; Mycobacterium/*metabolism ; Protein Multimerization ; Protein Structure, Secondary ; Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Proteins/*chemistry
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2014-03-15
    Description: Innate immunity relies on the perception of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) by pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) located on the host cell's surface. Many plant PRRs are kinases. Here, we report that the Arabidopsis receptor kinase EF-TU RECEPTOR (EFR), which perceives the elf18 peptide derived from bacterial elongation factor Tu, is activated upon ligand binding by phosphorylation on its tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of a single tyrosine residue, Y836, is required for activation of EFR and downstream immunity to the phytopathogenic bacterium Pseudomonas syringae. A tyrosine phosphatase, HopAO1, secreted by P. syringae, reduces EFR phosphorylation and prevents subsequent immune responses. Thus, host and pathogen compete to take control of PRR tyrosine phosphorylation used to initiate antibacterial immunity.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Macho, Alberto P -- Schwessinger, Benjamin -- Ntoukakis, Vardis -- Brutus, Alexandre -- Segonzac, Cecile -- Roy, Sonali -- Kadota, Yasuhiro -- Oh, Man-Ho -- Sklenar, Jan -- Derbyshire, Paul -- Lozano-Duran, Rosa -- Malinovsky, Frederikke Gro -- Monaghan, Jacqueline -- Menke, Frank L -- Huber, Steven C -- He, Sheng Yang -- Zipfel, Cyril -- BB/G024944/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- R01AI060761/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Mar 28;343(6178):1509-12. doi: 10.1126/science.1248849. Epub 2014 Mar 13.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉The Sainsbury Laboratory, Norwich Research Park, Norwich NR4 7UH, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24625928" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Arabidopsis/*immunology/*microbiology ; Arabidopsis Proteins/agonists/*metabolism ; Bacterial Proteins/*metabolism ; Peptide Elongation Factor Tu/*metabolism ; Peptides/metabolism/pharmacology ; Phosphorylation ; Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases/*metabolism ; Pseudomonas syringae/enzymology/*pathogenicity ; Receptors, Pattern Recognition/agonists/*metabolism ; Tyrosine/metabolism
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2011-07-30
    Description: Plants generate effective responses to infection by recognizing both conserved and variable pathogen-encoded molecules. Pathogens deploy virulence effector proteins into host cells, where they interact physically with host proteins to modulate defense. We generated an interaction network of plant-pathogen effectors from two pathogens spanning the eukaryote-eubacteria divergence, three classes of Arabidopsis immune system proteins, and ~8000 other Arabidopsis proteins. We noted convergence of effectors onto highly interconnected host proteins and indirect, rather than direct, connections between effectors and plant immune receptors. We demonstrated plant immune system functions for 15 of 17 tested host proteins that interact with effectors from both pathogens. Thus, pathogens from different kingdoms deploy independently evolved virulence proteins that interact with a limited set of highly connected cellular hubs to facilitate their diverse life-cycle strategies.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3170753/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3170753/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Mukhtar, M Shahid -- Carvunis, Anne-Ruxandra -- Dreze, Matija -- Epple, Petra -- Steinbrenner, Jens -- Moore, Jonathan -- Tasan, Murat -- Galli, Mary -- Hao, Tong -- Nishimura, Marc T -- Pevzner, Samuel J -- Donovan, Susan E -- Ghamsari, Lila -- Santhanam, Balaji -- Romero, Viviana -- Poulin, Matthew M -- Gebreab, Fana -- Gutierrez, Bryan J -- Tam, Stanley -- Monachello, Dario -- Boxem, Mike -- Harbort, Christopher J -- McDonald, Nathan -- Gai, Lantian -- Chen, Huaming -- He, Yijian -- European Union Effectoromics Consortium -- Vandenhaute, Jean -- Roth, Frederick P -- Hill, David E -- Ecker, Joseph R -- Vidal, Marc -- Beynon, Jim -- Braun, Pascal -- Dangl, Jeffery L -- BB/E024815/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/G015066/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- E024815/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- F005806/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- G015066/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- GM-066025/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 HG004233/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- P50 HG004233-04/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- P50-HG004233/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM066025/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM066025-07/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jul 29;333(6042):596-601. doi: 10.1126/science.1203659.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC 27599, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21798943" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Arabidopsis/genetics/*immunology/*metabolism/microbiology ; Bacterial Proteins/metabolism ; Evolution, Molecular ; Genes, Plant ; *Host-Pathogen Interactions ; Immunity, Innate ; Oomycetes/pathogenicity ; Plant Diseases/*immunology ; *Plant Immunity ; Protein Interaction Mapping ; Pseudomonas syringae/pathogenicity ; Receptors, Immunologic/*metabolism ; Virulence Factors/*metabolism
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2010-12-18
    Description: Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant brain tumor of children. To identify the genetic alterations in this tumor type, we searched for copy number alterations using high-density microarrays and sequenced all known protein-coding genes and microRNA genes using Sanger sequencing in a set of 22 MBs. We found that, on average, each tumor had 11 gene alterations, fewer by a factor of 5 to 10 than in the adult solid tumors that have been sequenced to date. In addition to alterations in the Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, our analysis led to the discovery of genes not previously known to be altered in MBs. Most notably, inactivating mutations of the histone-lysine N-methyltransferase genes MLL2 or MLL3 were identified in 16% of MB patients. These results demonstrate key differences between the genetic landscapes of adult and childhood cancers, highlight dysregulation of developmental pathways as an important mechanism underlying MBs, and identify a role for a specific type of histone methylation in human tumorigenesis.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3110744/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3110744/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Parsons, D Williams -- Li, Meng -- Zhang, Xiaosong -- Jones, Sian -- Leary, Rebecca J -- Lin, Jimmy Cheng-Ho -- Boca, Simina M -- Carter, Hannah -- Samayoa, Josue -- Bettegowda, Chetan -- Gallia, Gary L -- Jallo, George I -- Binder, Zev A -- Nikolsky, Yuri -- Hartigan, James -- Smith, Doug R -- Gerhard, Daniela S -- Fults, Daniel W -- VandenBerg, Scott -- Berger, Mitchel S -- Marie, Suely Kazue Nagahashi -- Shinjo, Sueli Mieko Oba -- Clara, Carlos -- Phillips, Peter C -- Minturn, Jane E -- Biegel, Jaclyn A -- Judkins, Alexander R -- Resnick, Adam C -- Storm, Phillip B -- Curran, Tom -- He, Yiping -- Rasheed, B Ahmed -- Friedman, Henry S -- Keir, Stephen T -- McLendon, Roger -- Northcott, Paul A -- Taylor, Michael D -- Burger, Peter C -- Riggins, Gregory J -- Karchin, Rachel -- Parmigiani, Giovanni -- Bigner, Darell D -- Yan, Hai -- Papadopoulos, Nick -- Vogelstein, Bert -- Kinzler, Kenneth W -- Velculescu, Victor E -- CA057345/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA096832/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA118822/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA121113/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- CA135877/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- GM074906-01A1/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- HHSN261200800001E/PHS HHS/ -- P01 CA096832/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- P01 CA096832-03/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA108622/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA121113/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA121113-05/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R37 CA057345/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R37 CA057345-20/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jan 28;331(6016):435-9. doi: 10.1126/science.1198056. Epub 2010 Dec 16.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Ludwig Center for Cancer Genetics and Therapeutics and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center, Baltimore, MD 21231, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21163964" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Cerebellar Neoplasms/*genetics/metabolism ; Child ; DNA Copy Number Variations ; DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; *Genes, Neoplasm ; Genes, Tumor Suppressor ; Histone-Lysine N-Methyltransferase/genetics/metabolism ; Histones/metabolism ; Humans ; Medulloblastoma/*genetics/metabolism ; Methylation ; MicroRNAs/genetics ; *Mutation ; Neoplasm Proteins/genetics/metabolism ; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis ; Point Mutation ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Signal Transduction
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    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2011-11-26
    Description: Abscisic acid (ABA) is an essential hormone for plants to survive environmental stresses. At the center of the ABA signaling network is a subfamily of type 2C protein phosphatases (PP2Cs), which form exclusive interactions with ABA receptors and subfamily 2 Snfl-related kinase (SnRK2s). Here, we report a SnRK2-PP2C complex structure, which reveals marked similarity in PP2C recognition by SnRK2 and ABA receptors. In the complex, the kinase activation loop docks into the active site of PP2C, while the conserved ABA-sensing tryptophan of PP2C inserts into the kinase catalytic cleft, thus mimicking receptor-PP2C interactions. These structural results provide a simple mechanism that directly couples ABA binding to SnRK2 kinase activation and highlight a new paradigm of kinase-phosphatase regulation through mutual packing of their catalytic sites.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3584687/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3584687/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Soon, Fen-Fen -- Ng, Ley-Moy -- Zhou, X Edward -- West, Graham M -- Kovach, Amanda -- Tan, M H Eileen -- Suino-Powell, Kelly M -- He, Yuanzheng -- Xu, Yong -- Chalmers, Michael J -- Brunzelle, Joseph S -- Zhang, Huiming -- Yang, Huaiyu -- Jiang, Hualiang -- Li, Jun -- Yong, Eu-Leong -- Cutler, Sean -- Zhu, Jian-Kang -- Griffin, Patrick R -- Melcher, Karsten -- Xu, H Eric -- GM084041/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 GM059138/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- S10 RR027270/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2012 Jan 6;335(6064):85-8. doi: 10.1126/science.1215106. Epub 2011 Nov 24.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Structural Sciences, Van Andel Research Institute, 333 Bostwick Avenue NE, Grand Rapids, MI 49503, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22116026" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Abscisic Acid/chemistry/*metabolism ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Arabidopsis/chemistry/*metabolism ; Arabidopsis Proteins/antagonists & inhibitors/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Catalytic Domain ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; Enzyme Activation ; Models, Molecular ; *Molecular Mimicry ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Phosphoprotein Phosphatases/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Phosphorylation ; Protein Binding ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/chemistry/metabolism ; Signal Transduction
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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