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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2013-12-21
    Description: Genome sequencing with next-generation sequence (NGS) technologies can now be applied to organisms pivotal to addressing fundamental biological questions, but with genomes previously considered intractable or too expensive to undertake. However, for species with large and complex genomes, extensive genetic and physical map resources have, until now, been required to direct the sequencing effort and sequence assembly. As these resources are unavailable for most species, assembling high-quality genome sequences from NGS data remains challenging. We describe a strategy that uses NGS, fluorescence in situ hybridization, and whole-genome mapping to assemble a high-quality genome sequence for Amborella trichopoda, a nonmodel species crucial to understanding flowering plant evolution. These methods are applicable to many other organisms with limited genomic resources.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Chamala, Srikar -- Chanderbali, Andre S -- Der, Joshua P -- Lan, Tianying -- Walts, Brandon -- Albert, Victor A -- dePamphilis, Claude W -- Leebens-Mack, Jim -- Rounsley, Steve -- Schuster, Stephan C -- Wing, Rod A -- Xiao, Nianqing -- Moore, Richard -- Soltis, Pamela S -- Soltis, Douglas E -- Barbazuk, W Brad -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2013 Dec 20;342(6165):1516-7. doi: 10.1126/science.1241130.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24357320" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Contig Mapping/*methods ; *Genome, Plant ; In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence ; Sequence Analysis, DNA/*methods ; Tracheobionta/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2014-07-12
    Description: Oscillating diurnal rhythms of gene transcription, metabolic activity, and behavior are found in all three domains of life. However, diel cycles in naturally occurring heterotrophic bacteria and archaea have rarely been observed. Here, we report time-resolved whole-genome transcriptome profiles of multiple, naturally occurring oceanic bacterial populations sampled in situ over 3 days. As anticipated, the cyanobacterial transcriptome exhibited pronounced diel periodicity. Unexpectedly, several different heterotrophic bacterioplankton groups also displayed diel cycling in many of their gene transcripts. Furthermore, diel oscillations in different heterotrophic bacterial groups suggested population-specific timing of peak transcript expression in a variety of metabolic gene suites. These staggered multispecies waves of diel gene transcription may influence both the tempo and the mode of matter and energy transformation in the sea.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Ottesen, Elizabeth A -- Young, Curtis R -- Gifford, Scott M -- Eppley, John M -- Marin, Roman 3rd -- Schuster, Stephan C -- Scholin, Christopher A -- DeLong, Edward F -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Jul 11;345(6193):207-12. doi: 10.1126/science.1252476.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE), University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA. Department of Microbiology, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, USA. ; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE), University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA. ; Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA 95039, USA. ; Singapore Centre on Environmental Life Sciences Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 637551 Singapore. ; Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE), University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822, USA. Department of Biological Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA. edelong@hawaii.edu.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25013074" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Alphaproteobacteria/*genetics ; *Circadian Rhythm ; Energy Metabolism/genetics ; Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial/*physiology ; Plankton/*genetics ; Prochlorococcus/*genetics ; Roseobacter/*genetics ; Seawater/*microbiology ; Transcription, Genetic/*physiology ; Transcriptome
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
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