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  • Blackwell Publishing Ltd  (4)
  • American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)  (1)
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  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Journal of food science 64 (1999), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1750-3841
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Using gas chromatography/olfactometry (GCO), major odors from the headspace of aqueous solutions of soy protein isolates were evaluated. Many corresponding odorants were identified by correlating GCO with GC/mass spectrometry (MS) on two separate stationary phases followed by comparing retention times, mass spectra, odor descriptions and odor intensities with authentic standards. Based on aroma extract dilution analyses, the most powerful odorants (strongest and most volatile first) were (1) dimethyl trisulfide, (2) trans,trans-2,4- decadienal, (3) an unidentified burnt soy sauce-like odor, (4) 2-pentyl pyridine, (5) trans,trans-2,4-nonadienal, (6) hexanal, (7) an unidentified charred sweaty feet-like odor, (8) acetophenone, and (9) 1-octen-3-one. This is the first reported occurrence of dimethyl trisulfide in soy protein isolates.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Journal of food science 68 (2003), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1750-3841
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: :Aqueous slurries of 6 commercial soy protein concentrate (SPC) contained from 9.8 to 21.7 ppb methanethiol, which corresponds to odor values (in water) of 49 to 108. Effects of temperature (5.5, 24, and 65°C), pH (4.8,6.6, and 9.0), transition metals (FeCl3, FeCl2, and CuCl2), lipoxygenase, and EDTA on methanethiol levels in SPC slurries were investigated. Higher temperature (65°C), basic pH (9.0), transition metals, lipoxygenase, and EDTA caused significant increases in methanethiol compared with the control. CuCl2 caused greater increases in methanethiol than FeCl3 and FeCl2. In contrast, treatments with lower temperature (5.5°C) or acidic pH (4.8) resulted in lower levels of methanethiol in all commercial SPC samples examined.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Journal of food science 66 (2001), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1750-3841
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: : Gas chromatography olfactometry/mass spectrometry (GCO/MS) studies on static and concentrated headspace of the aqueous slurries from soy protein concentrate (SPC) revealed acetaldehyde, methanethiol, hexanal, dimethyl trisulfide (DMTS), and 2-pentyl furan as the most odorous volatiles. Further aroma extract dilution analysis (AEDA) of the volatile extracts identified the following as the odorous substances: hexanal, 2-heptanone, octanal, 2-octanone, 1-octen-3-one, DMTS, 3-octen-2-one, 2-decanone, benzaldehyde, 2-pentyl pyridine and trans, trans-2,4- nonadienal, along with several unidentified odorants. Methanethiol and acetaldehyde, which have low boiling points, were not detected by AEDA, however. This is the first time that acetaldehyde, methanethiol, and dimethyl trisulfide have been identified as primary odorants in SPC.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Publishing Ltd
    Journal of food science 65 (2000), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1750-3841
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition , Process Engineering, Biotechnology, Nutrition Technology
    Notes: Volatile compounds from 2 samples of aqueous soy-protein isolates (SPI) (7%) were analyzed using both static and dynamic headspace methods. Based on dynamic headspace analyses, the most powerful odorants were (1) dimethyl trisulfide, (2) methanethiol, (3) hexanal, (4) an unidentified charred, sweaty feet-like odor, (5) 2-pentyl furan, (6) 2,3-butadione, and (7) an unknown burnt-like odor. The most powerful odorants by static headspace analyses were (1) dimethyl trisulfide, (2) hexanal, (3) methanethiol, and (4) 2-pentyl furan. Using deuterium labeled DMTS as an internal standard, DMTS was quantified at 60.1 and 45.5 ppb in the SPIs. This corresponds to odor values of 6014 and 4554, respectively. Using a cool, on-column technique, direct injection of concentrated-headspace volatiles and solvent-recovered volatiles with an internal standard of d6-DMTS detected both methanethiol and DMTS at similar levels as with the traditional injection methods.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 5
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    In: Science
    Publication Date: 2018-08-10
    Description: The Hedgehog (Hh) pathway involved in development and regeneration is activated by the extracellular binding of Hh to the membrane receptor Patched (Ptch). We report the structures of human Ptch1 alone and in complex with the N-terminal domain of human Sonic hedgehog (ShhN) at resolutions of 3.9 and 3.6 angstroms, respectively, as determined by cryo–electron microscopy. Ptch1 comprises two interacting extracellular domains, ECD1 and ECD2, and 12 transmembrane segments (TMs), with TMs 2 to 6 constituting the sterol-sensing domain (SSD). Two steroid-shaped densities are resolved in both structures, one enclosed by ECD1/2 and the other in the membrane-facing cavity of the SSD. Structure-guided mutational analysis shows that interaction between ShhN and Ptch1 is steroid-dependent. The structure of a steroid binding–deficient Ptch1 mutant displays pronounced conformational rearrangements.
    Keywords: Biochemistry
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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