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  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Science, Ltd
    Journal of applied ichthyology 16 (2000), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1439-0426
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology , Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Science, Ltd
    Journal of applied ichthyology 16 (2000), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1439-0426
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology , Agriculture, Forestry, Horticulture, Fishery, Domestic Science, Nutrition
    Notes: There is a current need to establish scientific guidelines for Best Environmental Practice for the regulation and monitoring of marine aquaculture throughout the European Union. This paper will demonstrate how the ‘MARAQUA’ Concerted Action will address this need using several methods including a comprehensive literature review and production of a computerized bibliography, establishment of a ‘Register of Experts’ and a worldwide website, circulation of a newsletter and a series of workshops. A brief comparison of the regulations and monitoring programmes associated with marine aquaculture in European countries is briefly outlined. These issues are described in depth in the individual country reviews presented in this special edition of the Journal.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    ISSN: 1442-9993
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: Abstract  Taken literally, the aim of biodiversity monitoring is to track changes in the biological integrity of ecosystems. Given the overwhelmingly dominant contribution of invertebrates to biodiversity, no biodiversity monitoring programme can be considered credible if invertebrates are not addressed effectively. Here we review the use of terrestrial invertebrates, with a particular focus on ants, as bioindicators in Australia in the context of monitoring biodiversity in Australia's rangelands. Ant monitoring systems in Australia were initially developed for assessing restoration success following mining, and have since been applied to a wide range of other land-use situations, including grazing impacts in rangelands. The use of ants as bioindicators in Australia is supported by an extensive portfolio of studies of the responses of ant communities to disturbance, as well as by a global model of ant community dynamics based on functional groups in relation to environmental stress and disturbance. Available data from mining studies suggest that ants reflect changes in other invertebrate groups, but this remains largely undocumented in rangelands. The feasibility of using ants as indicators in land management remains a key issue, given the large numbers of taxonomically challenging specimens in samples, and a lack of invertebrate expertise within most land-management agencies. However, recent work has shown that major efficiencies can be achieved by simplifying the ant sorting process, and such efficiencies can actually enhance rather than compromise indicator performance.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1365-3040
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Biology
    Notes: A pathway for the transfer of nutrients from dead nematodes to mycorrhizal plants is described for the first time. Plants of Betula pendula were grown in transparent microcosms in the mycorrhizal (M) or non-mycorrhizal (NM) condition, either with or without nematode necromass of known nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) contents as the major potential source of these elements. Plants colonized by the mycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus produced greater yields and had larger N and P contents in the presence of nematodes than did their NM counterparts. The symbiotic systems were shown to exploit the N and P originally contained in necromass more effectively, and to transfer the nutrients to the plants in quantities approximately double those seen in NM systems. Even so, NM plants obtained sufficient N and P from dead nematodes to enable some enhancement of growth. Our observations confirm that mycorrhizal fungi provide the potential for the recycling of nutrients contained in this quantitatively important component of the soil mesofauna and demonstrate that the symbiotic pathway is considerably more effective than that provided by saprotrophs alone. The consequences of this nutrient transfer pathway for nutrient recycling in temperate forest ecosystems are considered.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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