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  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Science Ltd
    Cytopathology 16 (2005), S. 0 
    ISSN: 1365-2303
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Science Ltd
    ISSN: 1365-2036
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: The falling prevalence of Helicobacter pylori infection and related diseases (peptic ulcer disease, gastric cancer) in developed countries has been paralleled by an increased recognition of gastro-oesophageal reflux and its complications. These epidemiological data do not support a role for H. pylori in the pathogenesis of reflux disease, but suggest a negative association with the increasing incidence of oesophageal diseases. This has led some investigators to propose a ‘protective’ role of H. pylori infection against the development of oesophageal diseases. In these patients, pre-existing lower oesophageal sphincter dysfunction, susceptibility to reflux, unmasking of latent reflux and the patterns and severity of gastritis are probably important factors contributing to the development of oesophageal diseases. The most likely mechanism by which H. pylori infection may protect against reflux is by decreasing the potency of the gastric refluxate in patients with corpus-predominant gastritis. The prevalence of H. pylori infection in patients with reflux disease is probably no greater than that in those without reflux, and there are conflicting data indicating that reflux symptoms or erosive oesophagitis develop after H. pylori eradication. It is also unclear whether H. pylori augments the antisecretory effects of proton pump inhibitors or accelerates the development of atrophic gastritis.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    Oxford, UK : Blackwell Science Ltd
    ISSN: 1365-2036
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: A number of endoscopic techniques have been described for the treatment of reflux disease. These include endoscopic plicators, which place submucosal or transmural sutures around the lower oesophageal sphincter, the Stretta procedure, which places minute areas of thermal injury in the muscle of the lower oesophageal sphincter and cardia, and injection techniques, in which inert substances are injected into the mucosa or the muscle of the lower oesophagus. The mechanism of action of these procedures has been studied to varying degrees. The Stretta procedure is the only endoscopic technique that has been shown to be effective in a sham-controlled trial. Complication rates are generally low, but serious complications have been reported in some cases. The results with some of these techniques are promising, but all procedures described to date are limited by the absence of large, rigorously controlled trials against a form of treatment that has been proven to be both safe and effective (medical therapy). Future studies will need to use controls, validated outcome measures and pre-determined end-points and to provide comparative and long-term data.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 4
    ISSN: 1365-2036
    Source: Blackwell Publishing Journal Backfiles 1879-2005
    Topics: Medicine
    Notes: Background : Barrett's oesophagus patients may continue to have abnormal oesophageal acid exposure on proton pump inhibitor therapy. The effect of factors such as Barrett's oesophagus length, hiatal hernia size and Helicobacter pylori infection on intra-oesophageal pH in Barrett's oesophagus patients has not been adequately studied.Aim : To evaluate oesophageal acid exposure in a large Barrett's oesophagus population on b.d. proton pump inhibitor therapy and determine clinical factors predicting normalization of intra-oesophageal pH on therapy.Methods : Barrett's oesophagus patients were studied using 24 h pH monitoring to evaluate intra-oesophageal acid suppression on b.d. dosing of rabeprazole.Results : Forty-six Barrett's oesophagus patients completed the study. Median total percentage time pH 〈 4 was 1.05% (range: 0–29.9%) in the entire group and respective values for upright and supine percentage time pH 〈 4 were 1.15% and 0%. However, 34 of the Barrett's oesophagus patients (73.9%) had a normal pH study (median total percentage time pH 〈 4: 0.2%) and 12 patients (26.1%) had an abnormal result (median total percentage time pH 〈 4: 9.3%). There were no significant differences between patients with a normal and abnormal 24 h pH result with respect to age, Barrett's oesophagus length, hiatal hernia size and presence of H. pylori infection.Conclusions : Approximately 25% of Barrett's oesophagus patients continue to have abnormal total intra-oesophageal pH profiles despite b.d. proton pump inhibitor therapy. Factors such as age, Barrett's oesophagus length and hiatal hernia size cannot be used to predict persistent abnormal intra-oesophageal pH on proton pump inhibitor.
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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