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  • American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)  (14)
  • Nature Publishing Group (NPG)  (8)
  • Nature Publishing Group  (5)
  • 1
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 219 (1968), S. 1292-1292 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] SIR,-Two months have passed since you published the last of a series of very provoking articles drawing attention to the many weaknesses in university government, and we have waited patiently and expectantly for some sort of reaction from your readers. Not one word in reply has yet been published. ...
    Type of Medium: Electronic Resource
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  • 2
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] The lakes were found in field surveys in the summers of 1982 and 1983. We used motorized rubber boats to make bathymie maps with a recording sonar, to sample for plankton, water chemistry, 14C productivity, thermal stratification and light penetration and to raise sediment cores with a Livingstone ...
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  • 3
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 195 (1962), S. 1220-1221 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] Gemmae are irradiated with X-rays and grown on a solid (agar) defined medium3 at 17 -22 C. A thallus arises presumably from a single apical cell at each of the two notches, at opposite ends of a gemma. Thalli are observed at the end of the second week and scored either as normal (35 units long, ...
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  • 4
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 204 (1964), S. 596-597 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] The gemmae of Marchantia polymorpha, a bryophyte, are convenient well-defined organs with features which make it possible to examine the radiosensitivity of particular cells within the structure. Normally, one of the two apical cells at each end of the gemma produces the new thallus; but in the ...
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  • 5
    Electronic Resource
    Electronic Resource
    [s.l.] : Nature Publishing Group
    Nature 202 (1964), S. 716-716 
    ISSN: 1476-4687
    Source: Nature Archives 1869 - 2009
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Notes: [Auszug] Sordaria fimicola, a homothallic pyrenomycete, was grown at 28 C in Petri plates containing Difco 'Corn Meal Agar' and 0-1 per cent yeast extract. Some plates also contained specific amounts of radio-protective chemicals, and all media were adjusted to pH 5-8 with 1 N sodium hydroxide. Mycelial ...
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-03-29
    Description: The Earth-Moon system likely formed as a result of a collision between two large planetary objects. Debate about their relative masses, the impact energy involved, and the extent of isotopic homogenization continues. We present the results of a high-precision oxygen isotope study of an extensive suite of lunar and terrestrial samples. We demonstrate that lunar rocks and terrestrial basalts show a 3 to 4 ppm (parts per million), statistically resolvable, difference in 17 O. Taking aubrite meteorites as a candidate impactor material, we show that the giant impact scenario involved nearly complete mixing between the target and impactor. Alternatively, the degree of similarity between the 17 O values of the impactor and the proto-Earth must have been significantly closer than that between Earth and aubrites. If the Earth-Moon system evolved from an initially highly vaporized and isotopically homogenized state, as indicated by recent dynamical models, then the terrestrial basalt-lunar oxygen isotope difference detected by our study may be a reflection of post–giant impact additions to Earth. On the basis of this assumption, our data indicate that post–giant impact additions to Earth could have contributed between 5 and 30% of Earth’s water, depending on global water estimates. Consequently, our data indicate that the bulk of Earth’s water was accreted before the giant impact and not later, as often proposed.
    Electronic ISSN: 2375-2548
    Topics: Natural Sciences in General
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  • 7
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    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS)
    In: Science
    Publication Date: 2018-08-17
    Description: We document rapid and abrupt clearings of large portions of the subtropical marine low cloud deck that have implications for the global radiation balance and climate sensitivity. Over the southeast Atlantic, large areas of stratocumulus are quickly eroded, yielding partial or complete clearing along sharp transitions hundreds to thousands of kilometers in length that move westward at 8 to 12 meters per second and travel as far as 1000+ kilometers from the African coast. The westward-moving cloudiness reductions have an annual peak in occurrence in the period from April through June. The cloud erosion boundaries reduce cloud at 10-kilometer scale in less than 15 minutes, move approximately perpendicular to the mean flow, and are often accompanied by small-scale wave features. Observations suggest that the cloud erosion is caused by atmospheric gravity waves.
    Keywords: Geochemistry, Geophysics
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Geosciences , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 8
    Publication Date: 2011-01-15
    Description: Long-term population viability of Fraser River sockeye salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) is threatened by unusually high levels of mortality as they swim to their spawning areas before they spawn. Functional genomic studies on biopsied gill tissue from tagged wild adults that were tracked through ocean and river environments revealed physiological profiles predictive of successful migration and spawning. We identified a common genomic profile that was correlated with survival in each study. In ocean-tagged fish, a mortality-related genomic signature was associated with a 13.5-fold greater chance of dying en route. In river-tagged fish, the same genomic signature was associated with a 50% increase in mortality before reaching the spawning grounds in one of three stocks tested. At the spawning grounds, the same signature was associated with 3.7-fold greater odds of dying without spawning. Functional analysis raises the possibility that the mortality-related signature reflects a viral infection.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Miller, Kristina M -- Li, Shaorong -- Kaukinen, Karia H -- Ginther, Norma -- Hammill, Edd -- Curtis, Janelle M R -- Patterson, David A -- Sierocinski, Thomas -- Donnison, Louise -- Pavlidis, Paul -- Hinch, Scott G -- Hruska, Kimberly A -- Cooke, Steven J -- English, Karl K -- Farrell, Anthony P -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2011 Jan 14;331(6014):214-7. doi: 10.1126/science.1196901.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Molecular Genetics Section, Pacific Biological Station, 3190 Hammond Bay Road, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, Nanaimo, BC V9T 6N7, Canada. kristi.miller@dfo-mpo.gc.ca〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21233388" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Animal Migration ; Animals ; Canada ; Female ; Fish Diseases/genetics/immunology/mortality ; *Gene Expression ; *Gene Expression Profiling ; Genome ; Gills ; Male ; Mortality ; Oligonucleotide Array Sequence Analysis ; Pacific Ocean ; Population Dynamics ; Principal Component Analysis ; Remote Sensing Technology ; *Reproduction ; Rivers ; Salmon/*genetics/*physiology ; Stress, Physiological ; Survival Analysis ; Virus Diseases/genetics/immunology/mortality/veterinary
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2014-07-19
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Marrero, Juan Carlos Antuna -- Miller, M Meghan -- Mattioli, Glen -- Feaux, Karl -- Anthes, Richard -- Braun, John -- Wang, Guoquan -- Robock, Alan -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2014 Jul 18;345(6194):278. doi: 10.1126/science.345.6194.278-a. Epub 2014 Jul 17.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Grupo de Optica Atmosferica de Camaguey, Centro Meteorologico de Camaguey, Instituto de Meteorologia de la Republica de Cuba, Cuba. ; UNAVCO, Boulder, CO 80301, USA. ; UNAVCO, Boulder, CO 80301, USA. mattioli@unavco.org. ; University Corporation for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80305, USA. ; Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Houston, TX 77004, USA. ; Department of Environmental Sciences, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08901, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25035480" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *International Cooperation ; Science/*trends
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2015-11-28
    Description: Solar photoconversion in semiconductors is driven by charge separation at the interface of the semiconductor and contacting layers. Here we demonstrate that time-resolved photoinduced reflectance from a semiconductor captures interfacial carrier dynamics. We applied this transient photoreflectance method to study charge transfer at p-type gallium-indium phosphide (p-GaInP2) interfaces critically important to solar-driven water splitting. We monitored the formation and decay of transient electric fields that form upon photoexcitation within bare p-GaInP2, p-GaInP2/platinum (Pt), and p-GaInP2/amorphous titania (TiO2) interfaces. The data show that a field at both the p-GaInP2/Pt and p-GaInP2/TiO2 interfaces drives charge separation. Additionally, the charge recombination rate at the p-GaInP2/TiO2 interface is greatly reduced owing to its p-n nature, compared with the Schottky nature of the p-GaInP2/Pt interface.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yang, Ye -- Gu, Jing -- Young, James L -- Miller, Elisa M -- Turner, John A -- Neale, Nathan R -- Beard, Matthew C -- New York, N.Y. -- Science. 2015 Nov 27;350(6264):1061-5. doi: 10.1126/science.aad3459.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, Golden, CO, 80401, USA. ye.yang@nrel.gov matt.beard@nrel.gov. ; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, Golden, CO, 80401, USA. ; National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Chemistry and Nanoscience Center, Golden, CO, 80401, USA. Material Science and Engineering Program, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO, 80309, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26612947" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0036-8075
    Electronic ISSN: 1095-9203
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Computer Science , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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