Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Publication Date: 2012-10-06
    Description: Some planetary systems harbour debris disks containing planetesimals such as asteroids and comets. Collisions between such bodies produce small dust particles, the spectral features of which reveal their composition and, hence, that of their parent bodies. A measurement of the composition of olivine crystals (Mg(2-2x)Fe(2x)SiO(4)) has been done for the protoplanetary disk HD 100546 (refs 3, 4) and for olivine crystals in the warm inner parts of planetary systems. The latter compares well with the iron-rich olivine in asteroids (x approximately 0.29). In the cold outskirts of the beta Pictoris system, an analogue to the young Solar System, olivine crystals were detected but their composition remained undetermined, leaving unknown how the composition of the bulk of Solar System cometary olivine grains compares with that of extrasolar comets. Here we report the detection of the 69-micrometre-wavelength band of olivine crystals in the spectrum of beta Pictoris. Because the disk is optically thin, we can associate the crystals with an extrasolar proto-Kuiper belt a distance of 15-45 astronomical units from the star (one astronomical unit is the Sun-Earth distance), determine their magnesium-rich composition (x = 0.01 +/- 0.001) and show that they make up 3.6 +/- 1.0 per cent of the total dust mass. These values are strikingly similar to those for the dust emitted by the most primitive comets in the Solar System, even though beta Pictoris is more massive and more luminous and has a different planetary system architecture.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉de Vries, B L -- Acke, B -- Blommaert, J A D L -- Waelkens, C -- Waters, L B F M -- Vandenbussche, B -- Min, M -- Olofsson, G -- Dominik, C -- Decin, L -- Barlow, M J -- Brandeker, A -- Di Francesco, J -- Glauser, A M -- Greaves, J -- Harvey, P M -- Holland, W S -- Ivison, R J -- Liseau, R -- Pantin, E E -- Pilbratt, G L -- Royer, P -- Sibthorpe, B -- England -- Nature. 2012 Oct 4;490(7418):74-6. doi: 10.1038/nature11469.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, KU Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, 3001 Leuven, Belgium. bldevries.science@gmail.com〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23038467" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Publication Date: 2012-11-16
    Description: For 10,000 years pigs and humans have shared a close and complex relationship. From domestication to modern breeding practices, humans have shaped the genomes of domestic pigs. Here we present the assembly and analysis of the genome sequence of a female domestic Duroc pig (Sus scrofa) and a comparison with the genomes of wild and domestic pigs from Europe and Asia. Wild pigs emerged in South East Asia and subsequently spread across Eurasia. Our results reveal a deep phylogenetic split between European and Asian wild boars approximately 1 million years ago, and a selective sweep analysis indicates selection on genes involved in RNA processing and regulation. Genes associated with immune response and olfaction exhibit fast evolution. Pigs have the largest repertoire of functional olfactory receptor genes, reflecting the importance of smell in this scavenging animal. The pig genome sequence provides an important resource for further improvements of this important livestock species, and our identification of many putative disease-causing variants extends the potential of the pig as a biomedical model.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3566564/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3566564/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Groenen, Martien A M -- Archibald, Alan L -- Uenishi, Hirohide -- Tuggle, Christopher K -- Takeuchi, Yasuhiro -- Rothschild, Max F -- Rogel-Gaillard, Claire -- Park, Chankyu -- Milan, Denis -- Megens, Hendrik-Jan -- Li, Shengting -- Larkin, Denis M -- Kim, Heebal -- Frantz, Laurent A F -- Caccamo, Mario -- Ahn, Hyeonju -- Aken, Bronwen L -- Anselmo, Anna -- Anthon, Christian -- Auvil, Loretta -- Badaoui, Bouabid -- Beattie, Craig W -- Bendixen, Christian -- Berman, Daniel -- Blecha, Frank -- Blomberg, Jonas -- Bolund, Lars -- Bosse, Mirte -- Botti, Sara -- Bujie, Zhan -- Bystrom, Megan -- Capitanu, Boris -- Carvalho-Silva, Denise -- Chardon, Patrick -- Chen, Celine -- Cheng, Ryan -- Choi, Sang-Haeng -- Chow, William -- Clark, Richard C -- Clee, Christopher -- Crooijmans, Richard P M A -- Dawson, Harry D -- Dehais, Patrice -- De Sapio, Fioravante -- Dibbits, Bert -- Drou, Nizar -- Du, Zhi-Qiang -- Eversole, Kellye -- Fadista, Joao -- Fairley, Susan -- Faraut, Thomas -- Faulkner, Geoffrey J -- Fowler, Katie E -- Fredholm, Merete -- Fritz, Eric -- Gilbert, James G R -- Giuffra, Elisabetta -- Gorodkin, Jan -- Griffin, Darren K -- Harrow, Jennifer L -- Hayward, Alexander -- Howe, Kerstin -- Hu, Zhi-Liang -- Humphray, Sean J -- Hunt, Toby -- Hornshoj, Henrik -- Jeon, Jin-Tae -- Jern, Patric -- Jones, Matthew -- Jurka, Jerzy -- Kanamori, Hiroyuki -- Kapetanovic, Ronan -- Kim, Jaebum -- Kim, Jae-Hwan -- Kim, Kyu-Won -- Kim, Tae-Hun -- Larson, Greger -- Lee, Kyooyeol -- Lee, Kyung-Tai -- Leggett, Richard -- Lewin, Harris A -- Li, Yingrui -- Liu, Wansheng -- Loveland, Jane E -- Lu, Yao -- Lunney, Joan K -- Ma, Jian -- Madsen, Ole -- Mann, Katherine -- Matthews, Lucy -- McLaren, Stuart -- Morozumi, Takeya -- Murtaugh, Michael P -- Narayan, Jitendra -- Nguyen, Dinh Truong -- Ni, Peixiang -- Oh, Song-Jung -- Onteru, Suneel -- Panitz, Frank -- Park, Eung-Woo -- Park, Hong-Seog -- Pascal, Geraldine -- Paudel, Yogesh -- Perez-Enciso, Miguel -- Ramirez-Gonzalez, Ricardo -- Reecy, James M -- Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra -- Rohrer, Gary A -- Rund, Lauretta -- Sang, Yongming -- Schachtschneider, Kyle -- Schraiber, Joshua G -- Schwartz, John -- Scobie, Linda -- Scott, Carol -- Searle, Stephen -- Servin, Bertrand -- Southey, Bruce R -- Sperber, Goran -- Stadler, Peter -- Sweedler, Jonathan V -- Tafer, Hakim -- Thomsen, Bo -- Wali, Rashmi -- Wang, Jian -- Wang, Jun -- White, Simon -- Xu, Xun -- Yerle, Martine -- Zhang, Guojie -- Zhang, Jianguo -- Zhang, Jie -- Zhao, Shuhong -- Rogers, Jane -- Churcher, Carol -- Schook, Lawrence B -- 095908/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- 249894/European Research Council/International -- 5 P41 LM006252/LM/NLM NIH HHS/ -- 5 P41LM006252/LM/NLM NIH HHS/ -- BB/E010520/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/E010520/2/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/E010768/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/E011640/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/G004013/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/H005935/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/I025328/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- G0900950/Medical Research Council/United Kingdom -- P20-RR017686/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- P30 DA018310/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R13 RR020283A/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- R13 RR032267A/RR/NCRR NIH HHS/ -- R21 DA027548/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R21 HG006464/HG/NHGRI NIH HHS/ -- T32 AI083196/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Nov 15;491(7424):393-8. doi: 10.1038/nature11622.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Animal Breeding and Genomics Centre, Wageningen University, De Elst 1, 6708 WD, Wageningen, The Netherlands. martien.groenen@wur.nl〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23151582" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Demography ; Genome/*genetics ; Models, Animal ; Molecular Sequence Data ; *Phylogeny ; Population Dynamics ; Sus scrofa/*classification/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 3
    Publication Date: 2016-03-17
    Description: CD8(+) T cells have a central role in antitumour immunity, but their activity is suppressed in the tumour microenvironment. Reactivating the cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells is of great clinical interest in cancer immunotherapy. Here we report a new mechanism by which the antitumour response of mouse CD8(+) T cells can be potentiated by modulating cholesterol metabolism. Inhibiting cholesterol esterification in T cells by genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of ACAT1, a key cholesterol esterification enzyme, led to potentiated effector function and enhanced proliferation of CD8(+) but not CD4(+) T cells. This is due to the increase in the plasma membrane cholesterol level of CD8(+) T cells, which causes enhanced T-cell receptor clustering and signalling as well as more efficient formation of the immunological synapse. ACAT1-deficient CD8(+) T cells were better than wild-type CD8(+) T cells at controlling melanoma growth and metastasis in mice. We used the ACAT inhibitor avasimibe, which was previously tested in clinical trials for treating atherosclerosis and showed a good human safety profile, to treat melanoma in mice and observed a good antitumour effect. A combined therapy of avasimibe plus an anti-PD-1 antibody showed better efficacy than monotherapies in controlling tumour progression. ACAT1, an established target for atherosclerosis, is therefore also a potential target for cancer immunotherapy.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4851431/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4851431/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yang, Wei -- Bai, Yibing -- Xiong, Ying -- Zhang, Jin -- Chen, Shuokai -- Zheng, Xiaojun -- Meng, Xiangbo -- Li, Lunyi -- Wang, Jing -- Xu, Chenguang -- Yan, Chengsong -- Wang, Lijuan -- Chang, Catharine C Y -- Chang, Ta-Yuan -- Zhang, Ti -- Zhou, Penghui -- Song, Bao-Liang -- Liu, Wanli -- Sun, Shao-cong -- Liu, Xiaolong -- Li, Bo-liang -- Xu, Chenqi -- HL 60306./HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL060306/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2016 Mar 31;531(7596):651-5. doi: 10.1038/nature17412. Epub 2016 Mar 16.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉State Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology, National Center for Protein Science Shanghai, Shanghai Science Research Center, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China. ; State Key Laboratory of Molecular Biology, CAS Center for Excellence in Molecular Cell Science, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China. ; Institute for Nutritional Sciences, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China. ; MOE Key Laboratory of Protein Science, School of Life Sciences, Collaborative Innovation Center for Infectious Diseases, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China. ; Department of Biochemistry, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Haven 03755, USA. ; Rheumatology and Immunology Department of ChangZheng Hospital, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai 200433, China. ; Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center, State Key Laboratory of Oncology in South China, Collaborative Innovation Center for Cancer Medicine, Guangzhou 510060, China. ; College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, Wuhan, Hubei Province 430072, China. ; Department of Immunology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77054, USA. ; State Key Laboratory of Cell Biology, CAS Center for Excellence in Molecular Cell Science, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031, China. ; School of Life Science and Technology, ShanghaiTech University, 100 Haike Road, Shanghai 201210, China.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26982734" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Acetates/*pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Acetyl-CoA C-Acetyltransferase/antagonists & ; inhibitors/deficiency/genetics/metabolism ; Animals ; Atherosclerosis/drug therapy ; CD8-Positive T-Lymphocytes/*drug effects/*immunology/metabolism ; Cell Membrane/drug effects/metabolism ; Cholesterol/*metabolism ; Esterification/drug effects ; Female ; Immunological Synapses/drug effects/immunology/metabolism ; Immunotherapy/*methods ; Male ; Melanoma/*drug therapy/*immunology/metabolism/pathology ; Mice ; Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/antagonists & inhibitors/immunology ; Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/immunology/metabolism ; Signal Transduction/drug effects ; Sulfonic Acids/*pharmacology/therapeutic use
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 4
    Publication Date: 2011-02-19
    Description: Toll-like receptors (TLRs) function as initiators of inflammation through their ability to sense pathogen-associated molecular patterns and products of tissue damage. Transcriptional activation of many TLR-responsive genes requires an initial de-repression step in which nuclear receptor co-repressor (NCoR) complexes are actively removed from the promoters of target genes to relieve basal repression. Ligand-dependent SUMOylation of liver X receptors (LXRs) has been found to suppress TLR4-induced transcription potently by preventing the NCoR clearance step, but the underlying mechanisms remain enigmatic. Here we provide evidence that coronin 2A (CORO2A), a component of the NCoR complex of previously unknown function, mediates TLR-induced NCoR turnover by a mechanism involving interaction with oligomeric nuclear actin. SUMOylated LXRs block NCoR turnover by binding to a conserved SUMO2/SUMO3-interaction motif in CORO2A and preventing actin recruitment. Intriguingly, the LXR transrepression pathway can itself be inactivated by inflammatory signals that induce calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIgamma (CaMKIIgamma)-dependent phosphorylation of LXRs, leading to their deSUMOylation by the SUMO protease SENP3 and release from CORO2A. These findings uncover a CORO2A-actin-dependent mechanism for the de-repression of inflammatory response genes that can be differentially regulated by phosphorylation and by nuclear receptor signalling pathways that control immunity and homeostasis.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3464905/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3464905/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Huang, Wendy -- Ghisletti, Serena -- Saijo, Kaoru -- Gandhi, Meghal -- Aouadi, Myriam -- Tesz, Greg J -- Zhang, Dawn X -- Yao, Joyee -- Czech, Michael P -- Goode, Bruce L -- Rosenfeld, Michael G -- Glass, Christopher K -- 1F31DK083913/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- CA52599/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- DK074868/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- DK085853/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- HC088093/HC/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- P01 DK074868/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- P50 HL056989/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA052599/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 CA097134/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R01 DK091183/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- R01 HL065445/HL/NHLBI NIH HHS/ -- R01 NS034934/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R37 DK039949/DK/NIDDK NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Feb 17;470(7334):414-8. doi: 10.1038/nature09703.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093-0651, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21331046" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Actins/chemistry/*metabolism ; Animals ; Calcium-Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase Type 2/metabolism ; Cell Line ; *Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects ; Gene Knockdown Techniques ; HeLa Cells ; Homeostasis/genetics ; Humans ; Inflammation/*genetics ; Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology ; Mice ; Microfilament Proteins/chemistry/deficiency/genetics/*metabolism ; Orphan Nuclear Receptors/metabolism ; Peptide Hydrolases/metabolism ; Peritonitis/chemically induced/metabolism ; Phosphorylation ; Promoter Regions, Genetic/genetics ; Protein Structure, Tertiary ; Signal Transduction ; Sumoylation ; Thioglycolates/pharmacology ; Toll-Like Receptors/metabolism
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 5
    Publication Date: 2012-03-31
    Description: The systematic translation of cancer genomic data into knowledge of tumour biology and therapeutic possibilities remains challenging. Such efforts should be greatly aided by robust preclinical model systems that reflect the genomic diversity of human cancers and for which detailed genetic and pharmacological annotation is available. Here we describe the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia (CCLE): a compilation of gene expression, chromosomal copy number and massively parallel sequencing data from 947 human cancer cell lines. When coupled with pharmacological profiles for 24 anticancer drugs across 479 of the cell lines, this collection allowed identification of genetic, lineage, and gene-expression-based predictors of drug sensitivity. In addition to known predictors, we found that plasma cell lineage correlated with sensitivity to IGF1 receptor inhibitors; AHR expression was associated with MEK inhibitor efficacy in NRAS-mutant lines; and SLFN11 expression predicted sensitivity to topoisomerase inhibitors. Together, our results indicate that large, annotated cell-line collections may help to enable preclinical stratification schemata for anticancer agents. The generation of genetic predictions of drug response in the preclinical setting and their incorporation into cancer clinical trial design could speed the emergence of 'personalized' therapeutic regimens.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3320027/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3320027/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Barretina, Jordi -- Caponigro, Giordano -- Stransky, Nicolas -- Venkatesan, Kavitha -- Margolin, Adam A -- Kim, Sungjoon -- Wilson, Christopher J -- Lehar, Joseph -- Kryukov, Gregory V -- Sonkin, Dmitriy -- Reddy, Anupama -- Liu, Manway -- Murray, Lauren -- Berger, Michael F -- Monahan, John E -- Morais, Paula -- Meltzer, Jodi -- Korejwa, Adam -- Jane-Valbuena, Judit -- Mapa, Felipa A -- Thibault, Joseph -- Bric-Furlong, Eva -- Raman, Pichai -- Shipway, Aaron -- Engels, Ingo H -- Cheng, Jill -- Yu, Guoying K -- Yu, Jianjun -- Aspesi, Peter Jr -- de Silva, Melanie -- Jagtap, Kalpana -- Jones, Michael D -- Wang, Li -- Hatton, Charles -- Palescandolo, Emanuele -- Gupta, Supriya -- Mahan, Scott -- Sougnez, Carrie -- Onofrio, Robert C -- Liefeld, Ted -- MacConaill, Laura -- Winckler, Wendy -- Reich, Michael -- Li, Nanxin -- Mesirov, Jill P -- Gabriel, Stacey B -- Getz, Gad -- Ardlie, Kristin -- Chan, Vivien -- Myer, Vic E -- Weber, Barbara L -- Porter, Jeff -- Warmuth, Markus -- Finan, Peter -- Harris, Jennifer L -- Meyerson, Matthew -- Golub, Todd R -- Morrissey, Michael P -- Sellers, William R -- Schlegel, Robert -- Garraway, Levi A -- DP2 OD002750/OD/NIH HHS/ -- DP2 OD002750-01/OD/NIH HHS/ -- R33 CA126674/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R33 CA126674-04/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R33 CA155554/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- R33 CA155554-02/CA/NCI NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 Mar 28;483(7391):603-7. doi: 10.1038/nature11003.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉The Broad Institute of Harvard and MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02142, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22460905" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Antineoplastic Agents/pharmacology ; Cell Line, Tumor ; Cell Lineage ; Chromosomes, Human/genetics ; Clinical Trials as Topic/methods ; *Databases, Factual ; Drug Screening Assays, Antitumor/*methods ; *Encyclopedias as Topic ; Gene Expression Profiling ; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic ; Genes, ras/genetics ; Genome, Human/genetics ; Genomics ; Humans ; Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism ; *Models, Biological ; Neoplasms/*drug therapy/genetics/metabolism/*pathology ; Pharmacogenetics ; Plasma Cells/cytology/drug effects/metabolism ; Precision Medicine/methods ; Receptor, IGF Type 1/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism ; Receptors, Aryl Hydrocarbon/genetics/metabolism ; Sequence Analysis, DNA ; Topoisomerase Inhibitors/pharmacology
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 6
    Publication Date: 2012-12-12
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Roth, Bryan L -- Marshall, Fiona H -- England -- Nature. 2012 Dec 6;492(7427):57. doi: 10.1038/492057a.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23222609" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Biochemistry/history ; *Chemistry/history ; Drug Discovery/history ; High-Throughput Screening Assays/history ; History, 20th Century ; History, 21st Century ; Humans ; *Nobel Prize ; Receptors, G-Protein-Coupled/genetics/isolation & purification/*metabolism ; Structure-Activity Relationship
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 7
    Publication Date: 2012-05-19
    Description: Members of the opioid receptor family of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are found throughout the peripheral and central nervous system, where they have key roles in nociception and analgesia. Unlike the 'classical' opioid receptors, delta, kappa and mu (delta-OR, kappa-OR and mu-OR), which were delineated by pharmacological criteria in the 1970s and 1980s, the nociceptin/orphanin FQ (N/OFQ) peptide receptor (NOP, also known as ORL-1) was discovered relatively recently by molecular cloning and characterization of an orphan GPCR. Although it shares high sequence similarity with classical opioid GPCR subtypes ( approximately 60%), NOP has a markedly distinct pharmacology, featuring activation by the endogenous peptide N/OFQ, and unique selectivity for exogenous ligands. Here we report the crystal structure of human NOP, solved in complex with the peptide mimetic antagonist compound-24 (C-24) (ref. 4), revealing atomic details of ligand-receptor recognition and selectivity. Compound-24 mimics the first four amino-terminal residues of the NOP-selective peptide antagonist UFP-101, a close derivative of N/OFQ, and provides important clues to the binding of these peptides. The X-ray structure also shows substantial conformational differences in the pocket regions between NOP and the classical opioid receptors kappa (ref. 5) and mu (ref. 6), and these are probably due to a small number of residues that vary between these receptors. The NOP-compound-24 structure explains the divergent selectivity profile of NOP and provides a new structural template for the design of NOP ligands.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356928/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3356928/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Thompson, Aaron A -- Liu, Wei -- Chun, Eugene -- Katritch, Vsevolod -- Wu, Huixian -- Vardy, Eyal -- Huang, Xi-Ping -- Trapella, Claudio -- Guerrini, Remo -- Calo, Girolamo -- Roth, Bryan L -- Cherezov, Vadim -- Stevens, Raymond C -- P50 GM073197/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- P50 GM073197-08/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA017204/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA017204-08/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA027170/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA027170-03/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA27170/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- U54 GM094618-02/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- Y1-CO-1020/CO/NCI NIH HHS/ -- Y1-GM-1104/GM/NIGMS NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2012 May 16;485(7398):395-9. doi: 10.1038/nature11085.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Molecular Biology, The Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California 92037, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22596163" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Binding Sites ; Biomimetic Materials/*chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology ; Crystallography, X-Ray ; HEK293 Cells ; Humans ; Ligands ; Models, Molecular ; Narcotic Antagonists ; Opioid Peptides/*chemistry/metabolism/pharmacology ; Piperidines/*chemistry/*metabolism/pharmacology ; Protein Conformation ; Receptors, Opioid/*chemistry/*metabolism ; Receptors, Opioid, kappa/chemistry/metabolism ; Spiro Compounds/*chemistry/*metabolism/pharmacology ; Substrate Specificity
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 8
    Publication Date: 2012-09-22
    Description: The low-temperature states of bosonic fluids exhibit fundamental quantum effects at the macroscopic scale: the best-known examples are Bose-Einstein condensation and superfluidity, which have been tested experimentally in a variety of different systems. When bosons interact, disorder can destroy condensation, leading to a 'Bose glass'. This phase has been very elusive in experiments owing to the absence of any broken symmetry and to the simultaneous absence of a finite energy gap in the spectrum. Here we report the observation of a Bose glass of field-induced magnetic quasiparticles in a doped quantum magnet (bromine-doped dichloro-tetrakis-thiourea-nickel, DTN). The physics of DTN in a magnetic field is equivalent to that of a lattice gas of bosons in the grand canonical ensemble; bromine doping introduces disorder into the hopping and interaction strength of the bosons, leading to their localization into a Bose glass down to zero field, where it becomes an incompressible Mott glass. The transition from the Bose glass (corresponding to a gapless spin liquid) to the Bose-Einstein condensate (corresponding to a magnetically ordered phase) is marked by a universal exponent that governs the scaling of the critical temperature with the applied field, in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions. Our study represents a quantitative experimental account of the universal features of disordered bosons in the grand canonical ensemble.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Yu, Rong -- Yin, Liang -- Sullivan, Neil S -- Xia, J S -- Huan, Chao -- Paduan-Filho, Armando -- Oliveira, Nei F Jr -- Haas, Stephan -- Steppke, Alexander -- Miclea, Corneliu F -- Weickert, Franziska -- Movshovich, Roman -- Mun, Eun-Deok -- Scott, Brian L -- Zapf, Vivien S -- Roscilde, Tommaso -- England -- Nature. 2012 Sep 20;489(7416):379-84. doi: 10.1038/nature11406.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, Texas 77005, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22996552" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 9
    Publication Date: 2012-12-14
    Description: The clinical efficacy and safety of a drug is determined by its activity profile across many proteins in the proteome. However, designing drugs with a specific multi-target profile is both complex and difficult. Therefore methods to design drugs rationally a priori against profiles of several proteins would have immense value in drug discovery. Here we describe a new approach for the automated design of ligands against profiles of multiple drug targets. The method is demonstrated by the evolution of an approved acetylcholinesterase inhibitor drug into brain-penetrable ligands with either specific polypharmacology or exquisite selectivity profiles for G-protein-coupled receptors. Overall, 800 ligand-target predictions of prospectively designed ligands were tested experimentally, of which 75% were confirmed to be correct. We also demonstrate target engagement in vivo. The approach can be a useful source of drug leads when multi-target profiles are required to achieve either selectivity over other drug targets or a desired polypharmacology.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3653568/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3653568/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Besnard, Jeremy -- Ruda, Gian Filippo -- Setola, Vincent -- Abecassis, Keren -- Rodriguiz, Ramona M -- Huang, Xi-Ping -- Norval, Suzanne -- Sassano, Maria F -- Shin, Antony I -- Webster, Lauren A -- Simeons, Frederick R C -- Stojanovski, Laste -- Prat, Annik -- Seidah, Nabil G -- Constam, Daniel B -- Bickerton, G Richard -- Read, Kevin D -- Wetsel, William C -- Gilbert, Ian H -- Roth, Bryan L -- Hopkins, Andrew L -- 083481/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- BB/FOF/PF/15/09/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- BB/J010510/1/Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council/United Kingdom -- MH082441/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01 DA017204/DA/NIDA NIH HHS/ -- R01 MH061887/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- U19 MH082441/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- WT 083481/Wellcome Trust/United Kingdom -- England -- Nature. 2012 Dec 13;492(7428):215-20. doi: 10.1038/nature11691.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Division of Biological Chemistry and Drug Discovery, College of Life Sciences, University of Dundee, Dundee DD1 5EH, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23235874" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animals ; Automation ; Drug Delivery Systems ; *Drug Design ; Female ; *Ligands ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Models, Theoretical ; Pharmacological Phenomena ; Reproducibility of Results
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 10
    Publication Date: 2011-12-23
    Description: Angelman syndrome is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by deletion or mutation of the maternal allele of the ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A). In neurons, the paternal allele of UBE3A is intact but epigenetically silenced, raising the possibility that Angelman syndrome could be treated by activating this silenced allele to restore functional UBE3A protein. Using an unbiased, high-content screen in primary cortical neurons from mice, we identify twelve topoisomerase I inhibitors and four topoisomerase II inhibitors that unsilence the paternal Ube3a allele. These drugs included topotecan, irinotecan, etoposide and dexrazoxane (ICRF-187). At nanomolar concentrations, topotecan upregulated catalytically active UBE3A in neurons from maternal Ube3a-null mice. Topotecan concomitantly downregulated expression of the Ube3a antisense transcript that overlaps the paternal copy of Ube3a. These results indicate that topotecan unsilences Ube3a in cis by reducing transcription of an imprinted antisense RNA. When administered in vivo, topotecan unsilenced the paternal Ube3a allele in several regions of the nervous system, including neurons in the hippocampus, neocortex, striatum, cerebellum and spinal cord. Paternal expression of Ube3a remained elevated in a subset of spinal cord neurons for at least 12 weeks after cessation of topotecan treatment, indicating that transient topoisomerase inhibition can have enduring effects on gene expression. Although potential off-target effects remain to be investigated, our findings suggest a therapeutic strategy for reactivating the functional but dormant allele of Ube3a in patients with Angelman syndrome.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3257422/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3257422/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Huang, Hsien-Sung -- Allen, John A -- Mabb, Angela M -- King, Ian F -- Miriyala, Jayalakshmi -- Taylor-Blake, Bonnie -- Sciaky, Noah -- Dutton, J Walter Jr -- Lee, Hyeong-Min -- Chen, Xin -- Jin, Jian -- Bridges, Arlene S -- Zylka, Mark J -- Roth, Bryan L -- Philpot, Benjamin D -- 5F32NS067712/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- 5P30NS045892/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- HHSN-271-2008-00025-C/PHS HHS/ -- P30 HD003110/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- P30 HD003110-45/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- P30HD03110/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- R01EY018323/EY/NEI NIH HHS/ -- R01MH093372/MH/NIMH NIH HHS/ -- R01NS060725/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- R01NS067688/NS/NINDS NIH HHS/ -- T32 HD040127/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- T32 HD040127-10/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- T32HD040127-07/HD/NICHD NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2011 Dec 21;481(7380):185-9. doi: 10.1038/nature10726.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Cell and Molecular Physiology, University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22190039" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: *Alleles ; Angelman Syndrome/drug therapy/genetics ; Animals ; Cells, Cultured ; Cerebral Cortex/cytology/drug effects/metabolism ; Drug Evaluation, Preclinical ; Fathers ; Female ; Gene Silencing/*drug effects ; Genomic Imprinting/drug effects/genetics ; Male ; Mice ; Mice, Inbred C57BL ; Mothers ; Neurons/*drug effects/*metabolism ; Small Molecule Libraries/administration & dosage/chemistry/pharmacology ; Topoisomerase Inhibitors/administration & ; dosage/analysis/pharmacokinetics/*pharmacology ; Topotecan/administration & dosage/pharmacokinetics/pharmacology ; Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases/deficiency/*genetics
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...