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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2013-12-07
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lehmann, Johannes -- England -- Nature. 2013 Dec 5;504(7478):33. doi: 10.1038/504033b.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24305139" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Agriculture/*methods ; Fertilizers/*supply & distribution ; Soil/*chemistry
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2015-11-26
    Description: The exchange of nutrients, energy and carbon between soil organic matter, the soil environment, aquatic systems and the atmosphere is important for agricultural productivity, water quality and climate. Long-standing theory suggests that soil organic matter is composed of inherently stable and chemically unique compounds. Here we argue that the available evidence does not support the formation of large-molecular-size and persistent 'humic substances' in soils. Instead, soil organic matter is a continuum of progressively decomposing organic compounds. We discuss implications of this view of the nature of soil organic matter for aquatic health, soil carbon-climate interactions and land management.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lehmann, Johannes -- Kleber, Markus -- England -- Nature. 2015 Dec 3;528(7580):60-8. doi: 10.1038/nature16069. Epub 2015 Nov 23.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Soil and Crop Sciences, School of Integrated Plant Sciences, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA. ; Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA. ; Department of Crop and Soil Science, Oregon State University, Corvallis, Oregon, USA. ; Institut fur Bodenlandschaftsforschung, Leibniz Zentrum fur Agrarlandschaftsforschung (ZALF), Muncheberg, Germany.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26595271" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Agriculture ; Carbon Cycle ; Crops, Agricultural/metabolism ; Ecosystem ; Humic Substances/*analysis ; Soil/*chemistry ; Water/chemistry
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2015-04-10
    Description: HIV-1 immunotherapy with a combination of first generation monoclonal antibodies was largely ineffective in pre-clinical and clinical settings and was therefore abandoned. However, recently developed single-cell-based antibody cloning methods have uncovered a new generation of far more potent broadly neutralizing antibodies to HIV-1 (refs 4, 5). These antibodies can prevent infection and suppress viraemia in humanized mice and nonhuman primates, but their potential for human HIV-1 immunotherapy has not been evaluated. Here we report the results of a first-in-man dose escalation phase 1 clinical trial of 3BNC117, a potent human CD4 binding site antibody, in uninfected and HIV-1-infected individuals. 3BNC117 infusion was well tolerated and demonstrated favourable pharmacokinetics. A single 30 mg kg(-1) infusion of 3BNC117 reduced the viral load in HIV-1-infected individuals by 0.8-2.5 log10 and viraemia remained significantly reduced for 28 days. Emergence of resistant viral strains was variable, with some individuals remaining sensitive to 3BNC117 for a period of 28 days. We conclude that, as a single agent, 3BNC117 is safe and effective in reducing HIV-1 viraemia, and that immunotherapy should be explored as a new modality for HIV-1 prevention, therapy and cure.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Caskey, Marina -- Klein, Florian -- Lorenzi, Julio C C -- Seaman, Michael S -- West, Anthony P Jr -- Buckley, Noreen -- Kremer, Gisela -- Nogueira, Lilian -- Braunschweig, Malte -- Scheid, Johannes F -- Horwitz, Joshua A -- Shimeliovich, Irina -- Ben-Avraham, Sivan -- Witmer-Pack, Maggi -- Platten, Martin -- Lehmann, Clara -- Burke, Leah A -- Hawthorne, Thomas -- Gorelick, Robert J -- Walker, Bruce D -- Keler, Tibor -- Gulick, Roy M -- Fatkenheuer, Gerd -- Schlesinger, Sarah J -- Nussenzweig, Michel C -- HHSN261200800001E/PHS HHS/ -- U19AI111825-01/AI/NIAID NIH HHS/ -- UL1 TR000043/TR/NCATS NIH HHS/ -- Howard Hughes Medical Institute/ -- England -- Nature. 2015 Jun 25;522(7557):487-91. doi: 10.1038/nature14411. Epub 2015 Apr 8.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Center for Virology and Vaccine Research, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02215, USA. ; Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125, USA. ; 1] First Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, D-50924 Cologne, Germany [2] Clinical Trials Center Cologne, ZKS Koln, BMBF 01KN1106, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany. ; 1] Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10065, USA [2] Albert Ludwigs University of Freiburg, 79085 Freiburg, Germany. ; 1] First Department of Internal Medicine, University Hospital of Cologne, D-50924 Cologne, Germany [2] German Center for Infection Research (DZIF), partner site Bonn-Cologne, Cologne, Germany. ; 1] Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10065, USA [2] Division of Infectious Diseases, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; Celldex Therapeutics, Inc., Hampton, New Jersey 08827, USA. ; AIDS and Cancer Virus Program, Leidos Biomedical Research, Frederick, Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research, Frederick, Maryland 21702, USA. ; Ragon Institute of MGH, MIT and Harvard, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA. ; Division of Infectious Diseases, Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, New York 10065, USA. ; 1] Laboratory of Molecular Immunology, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10065, USA [2] Howard Hughes Medical Institute, The Rockefeller University, New York, New York 10065, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25855300" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Adult ; Amino Acid Sequence ; Antibodies, Monoclonal/administration & ; dosage/immunology/pharmacokinetics/therapeutic use ; Antibodies, Neutralizing/administration & dosage/adverse ; effects/*immunology/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; Antigens, CD4/metabolism ; Binding Sites ; Case-Control Studies ; Evolution, Molecular ; Female ; HIV Antibodies/administration & dosage/adverse ; effects/*immunology/pharmacology/therapeutic use ; HIV Envelope Protein gp120/chemistry/immunology ; HIV Infections/immunology/*therapy/virology ; HIV-1/chemistry/drug effects/*immunology ; Humans ; Immunization, Passive/methods ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Molecular Sequence Data ; Time Factors ; Viral Load/drug effects/*immunology ; Viremia/immunology/*therapy/virology ; Young Adult
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2016-03-24
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Caskey, Marina -- Klein, Florian -- Lorenzi, Julio C C -- Seaman, Michael S -- West, Anthony P -- Buckley, Noreen -- Kremer, Gisela -- Nogueira, Lilian -- Braunschweig, Malte -- Scheid, Johannes F -- Horwitz, Joshua A -- Shimeliovich, Irina -- Ben-Avraham, Sivan -- Witmer-Pack, Maggi -- Platten, Martin -- Lehmann, Clara -- Burke, Leah A -- Hawthorne, Thomas -- Gorelick, Robert J -- Walker, Bruce D -- Keler, Tibor -- Gulick, Roy M -- Fatkenheuer, Gerd -- Schlesinger, Sarah J -- Nussenzweig, Michel C -- Nature. 2016 Mar 23. doi: 10.1038/nature17642.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27007847" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2016-03-18
    Description: Controlled formation of non-equilibrium crystal structures is one of the most important challenges in crystal growth. Catalytically grown nanowires are ideal systems for studying the fundamental physics of phase selection, and could lead to new electronic applications based on the engineering of crystal phases. Here we image gallium arsenide (GaAs) nanowires during growth as they switch between phases as a result of varying growth conditions. We find clear differences between the growth dynamics of the phases, including differences in interface morphology, step flow and catalyst geometry. We explain these differences, and the phase selection, using a model that relates the catalyst volume, the contact angle at the trijunction (the point at which solid, liquid and vapour meet) and the nucleation site of each new layer of GaAs. This model allows us to predict the conditions under which each phase should be observed, and use these predictions to design GaAs heterostructures. These results could apply to phase selection in other nanowire systems.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4876924/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4876924/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Jacobsson, Daniel -- Panciera, Federico -- Tersoff, Jerry -- Reuter, Mark C -- Lehmann, Sebastian -- Hofmann, Stephan -- Dick, Kimberly A -- Ross, Frances M -- England -- Nature. 2016 Mar 17;531(7594):317-22. doi: 10.1038/nature17148.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Solid State Physics and NanoLund, Lund University, Box 118, 221 00 Lund, Sweden. ; Centre for Analysis and Synthesis, Lund University, Box 124, 221 00 Lund, Sweden. ; Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, 9 JJ Thomson Avenue, Cambridge CB3 0FA, UK. ; IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26983538" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2016-04-15
    Description: Soils are integral to the function of all terrestrial ecosystems and to food and fibre production. An overlooked aspect of soils is their potential to mitigate greenhouse gas emissions. Although proven practices exist, the implementation of soil-based greenhouse gas mitigation activities are at an early stage and accurately quantifying emissions and reductions remains a substantial challenge. Emerging research and information technology developments provide the potential for a broader inclusion of soils in greenhouse gas policies. Here we highlight 'state of the art' soil greenhouse gas research, summarize mitigation practices and potentials, identify gaps in data and understanding and suggest ways to close such gaps through new research, technology and collaboration.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Paustian, Keith -- Lehmann, Johannes -- Ogle, Stephen -- Reay, David -- Robertson, G Philip -- Smith, Pete -- England -- Nature. 2016 Apr 7;532(7597):49-57. doi: 10.1038/nature17174.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. ; Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. ; Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future, Department of Soil and Crop Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA. ; Department of Ecosystem Science and Sustainability, Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado, USA. ; School of Geosciences, University of Edinburgh, Edinburgh, UK. ; W. K. Kellogg Biological Station and Department of Plant, Soil and Microbial Sciences, Michigan State University, East Lansing, Michigan, USA. ; Institute of Biological and Environmental Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen, UK.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27078564" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Agriculture/economics/*methods/trends ; Carbon Dioxide/metabolism ; *Carbon Sequestration ; Greenhouse Effect/*prevention & control ; Internationality ; Methane/metabolism ; Nitrous Oxide/metabolism ; Research/trends ; Soil/*chemistry ; Uncertainty
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 7
    Publication Date: 2018-12-11
    Description: Poling of an artificial magneto-toroidal crystal Poling of an artificial magneto-toroidal crystal, Published online: 10 December 2018; doi:10.1038/s41565-018-0321-x The long-range magnetic order in an artificial crystal that exhibits emergent ferrotoroidicity on the mesoscale can be manipulated by an effective magnetic vortex field that is generated by a scanning process with a magnetic tip.
    Print ISSN: 1748-3387
    Electronic ISSN: 1748-3395
    Topics: Physics
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  • 8
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    Nature Publishing Group (NPG)
    Publication Date: 2012-05-12
    Description: 〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Lehmann, Ulrich -- England -- Nature. 2012 May 9;485(7397):174. doi: 10.1038/485174e.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22575946" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: History, 20th Century ; *Knowledge ; Literature, Modern/*history ; Philosophy/history ; Science/*history ; Sociology/*history
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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  • 9
    Publication Date: 2018-12-14
    Description: Author Correction: ATF4 regulation of mitochondrial folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism is neuroprotective Author Correction: ATF4 regulation of mitochondrial folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism is neuroprotective, Published online: 13 December 2018; doi:10.1038/s41418-018-0253-x Author Correction: ATF4 regulation of mitochondrial folate-mediated one-carbon metabolism is neuroprotective
    Print ISSN: 1350-9047
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-5403
    Topics: Biology , Medicine
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  • 10
    Publication Date: 2014-12-04
    Description: During the long Sahelian dry season, mosquito vectors of malaria are expected to perish when no larval sites are available; yet, days after the first rains, mosquitoes reappear in large numbers. How these vectors persist over the 3-6-month long dry season has not been resolved, despite extensive research for over a century. Hypotheses for vector persistence include dry-season diapause (aestivation) and long-distance migration (LDM); both are facets of vector biology that have been highly controversial owing to lack of concrete evidence. Here we show that certain species persist by a form of aestivation, while others engage in LDM. Using time-series analyses, the seasonal cycles of Anopheles coluzzii, Anopheles gambiae sensu stricto (s.s.), and Anopheles arabiensis were estimated, and their effects were found to be significant, stable and highly species-specific. Contrary to all expectations, the most complex dynamics occurred during the dry season, when the density of A. coluzzii fluctuated markedly, peaking when migration would seem highly unlikely, whereas A. gambiae s.s. was undetected. The population growth of A. coluzzii followed the first rains closely, consistent with aestivation, whereas the growth phase of both A. gambiae s.s. and A. arabiensis lagged by two months. Such a delay is incompatible with local persistence, but fits LDM. Surviving the long dry season in situ allows A. coluzzii to predominate and form the primary force of malaria transmission. Our results reveal profound ecological divergence between A. coluzzii and A. gambiae s.s., whose standing as distinct species has been challenged, and suggest that climate is one of the selective pressures that led to their speciation. Incorporating vector dormancy and LDM is key to predicting shifts in the range of malaria due to global climate change, and to the elimination of malaria from Africa.〈br /〉〈br /〉〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4306333/" target="_blank"〉〈img src="https://static.pubmed.gov/portal/portal3rc.fcgi/4089621/img/3977009" border="0"〉〈/a〉   〈a href="https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4306333/" target="_blank"〉This paper as free author manuscript - peer-reviewed and accepted for publication〈/a〉〈br /〉〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Notes: 〈/span〉Dao, A -- Yaro, A S -- Diallo, M -- Timbine, S -- Huestis, D L -- Kassogue, Y -- Traore, A I -- Sanogo, Z L -- Samake, D -- Lehmann, T -- Z99 AI999999/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- ZIA AI001196-01/Intramural NIH HHS/ -- England -- Nature. 2014 Dec 18;516(7531):387-90. doi: 10.1038/nature13987. Epub 2014 Nov 26.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Author address: 〈/span〉International Center for Excellence in Research (ICER), University of Sciences, Techniques and Technologies, BP 1805, Bamako, Mali. ; Laboratory of Malaria and Vector Research, National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, National Institutes of Health, Rockville, Maryland 20852, USA.〈br /〉〈span class="detail_caption"〉Record origin:〈/span〉 〈a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25470038" target="_blank"〉PubMed〈/a〉
    Keywords: Animal Migration/*physiology ; Animals ; Anopheles/*physiology ; Anopheles gambiae/physiology ; Estivation/*physiology ; Insect Vectors/*physiology ; Malaria/transmission ; *Models, Biological ; Population Density ; Population Dynamics ; Rain ; *Seasons ; Species Specificity
    Print ISSN: 0028-0836
    Electronic ISSN: 1476-4687
    Topics: Biology , Chemistry and Pharmacology , Medicine , Natural Sciences in General , Physics
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