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  • 1
    Publication Date: 2018-04-04
    Description: Background: Associations between physical activity and pancreatic cancer risk are unclear. Methods: In two prospective cohort studies, the Shanghai Women's Health Study and Shanghai Men's Health Study, physical activity and other information were collected at the baseline interview of 72,451 women and 60,037 men. Participants were followed up through annual linkage with a cancer registry in combination with in-person interviews taking place every 2 to 4 years. Results: We identified 225 female and 159 male cases during a median follow up of 16.1 and 10.3 years, respectively. Adult exercise participation was significantly associated with a decreased pancreatic cancer risk in men [hazard ratio (HR), 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.71 (0.50–1.00)]. Meeting the recommended minimum exercise threshold to achieve health benefits of 150 min/week of moderate-intensity or 75 min/week of vigorous-intensity exercise was associated with further decreased pancreatic cancer risk [HR (95% CI): 0.59 (0.40–0.87)]. We also observed an inverse association between adolescent physical activity and pancreatic cancer risk in men [HR (95% CI): 0.54 (0.33–0.90)]. Exercise throughout one's lifetime was associated with a 68% decrease in pancreatic cancer risk [HR (95% CI): 0.32 (0.16–0.66)]. No significant association was found in women. Adult non-exercise daily activity and occupational activity were not associated with pancreatic cancer risk in either men or women. Conclusions: Adult exercise and adolescent physical activity were significantly associated with a decreased pancreatic cancer risk in men but not in women. Impact: These findings underscore the importance of investigating the possible modification by sex on the exercise and pancreatic cancer risk association. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 27(4); 479–87. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1055-9965
    Electronic ISSN: 1538-7755
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 2
    Publication Date: 2018-03-06
    Description: Background: Infection with Helicobacter pylori is the leading risk factor for noncardia gastric cancer, yet its influence on prognosis of gastric cancer is largely unknown. Thus, exploring the role of Helicobacter pylori ( H. pylori ) in survival could lead to a greater understanding of the high mortality associated with gastric cancer. Methods: Seropositivity to 15 H. pylori antigens was assessed using a multiplex assay in two prospective cohorts, the Shanghai Men's Health Study and the Shanghai Women's Health Study. Multivariable-adjusted Cox proportional hazards regression was used to examine the association between prediagnostic H. pylori antigen levels and gastric cancer–specific survival. Results: Prediagnostic levels of H. pylori serum antibodies that were previously associated with gastric cancer incidence in this population were not associated with gastric cancer survival, whether assessed in a 6-antigen panel [HR = 1.29; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.78–2.13 for men; HR = 0.93; 95% CI, 0.57–1.52 for women], focused on CagA + H. pylori (HR = 0.73; 95% CI, 0.44–1.20 forwomen; HR = 1.27; 95% CI, 0.70–2.31 for men) or on the high-risk biomarkers of dual Omp and HP 0305 seropositivity (HR = 0.97; 95% CI, 0.72–1.30 for women; HR = 1.37; 95% CI, 0.97–1.94 for men). Conclusions: Prediagnostic H. pylori antigen levels are not associated with gastric cancer survival in East Asian populations. Impact: Identification of additional factors associated with gastric cancer survival would further our understanding of the high mortality associated with this malignancy. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 27(3); 342–4. ©2017 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1055-9965
    Electronic ISSN: 1538-7755
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 3
    Publication Date: 2018-01-09
    Description: Background: Pancreatic cancer mutation signatures closely resemble breast cancer, suggesting that both cancers may have common predisposition mechanisms that may include commonly inherited SNPs. Methods: We examined 23 genetic variants known to be associated with pancreatic cancer as breast cancer risk factors in the Root genome-wide association study (GWAS; 1,657 cases and 2,029 controls of African diaspora) and GAME-ON/DRIVE GWAS (16,003 cases and 41,335 controls of European ancestry). Results: None of the pancreatic cancer susceptibility variants were individually associated with breast cancer risk after adjustment for multiple testing (at α = 0.002) in the two populations. In Root GWAS, a change by one SD in the polygenic risk score (PRS) was not significantly associated with breast cancer. In addition, we did not observe a trend in the relationship between PRS percentiles and breast cancer risk. Conclusions: The association between reported pancreatic cancer genetic susceptibility variants and breast cancer development in women of African or European ancestry is likely weak, if it does exist. Impact: Known GWAS-derived susceptibility variants of pancreatic cancer do not explain its shared genetic etiology with breast cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 27(1); 116–8. ©2017 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1055-9965
    Electronic ISSN: 1538-7755
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 4
    Publication Date: 2018-11-02
    Description: Background: Pathogenic germline mutations in the CDKN2A tumor suppressor gene are rare and associated with highly penetrant familial melanoma and pancreatic cancer in non-Hispanic whites (NHW). To date, the prevalence and impact of CDKN2A rare coding variants (RCV) in racial minority groups remain poorly characterized. We examined the role of CDKN2A RCVs on the risk of pancreatic cancer among minority subjects. Methods: We sequenced CDKN2A in 220 African American (AA) pancreatic cancer cases, 900 noncancer AA controls, and 183 Nigerian controls. RCV frequencies were determined for each group and compared with that of 1,537 NHW patients with pancreatic cancer. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for both a case–case comparison of RCV frequencies in AAs versus NHWs, and case–control comparison between AA cases versus noncancer AA controls plus Nigerian controls. Smaller sets of Hispanic and Native American cases and controls also were sequenced. Results: One novel missense RCV and one novel frameshift RCV were found among AA patients: 400G〉A and 258_278del. RCV carrier status was associated with increased risk of pancreatic cancer among AA cases (11/220; OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 1.5–7.1; P = 0.004) compared with AA and Nigerian controls (17/1,083). Further, AA cases had higher frequency of RCVs: 5.0% (OR, 13.4; 95% CI, 4.9–36.7; P 〈 0.001) compared with NHW cases (0.4%). Conclusions: CDKN2A RCVs are more common in AA than in NHW patients with pancreatic cancer and associated with moderately increased pancreatic cancer risk among AAs. Impact: RCVs in CDKN2A are frequent in AAs and are associated with risk for pancreatic cancer. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 27(11); 1364–70. ©2018 AACR.
    Print ISSN: 1055-9965
    Electronic ISSN: 1538-7755
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 5
    Publication Date: 2018-12-04
    Description: Background: Helicobacter pylori is the leading cause of gastric cancer, yet the majority of infected individuals will not develop neoplasia. Previously, we developed and replicated serologic H. pylori biomarkers for gastric cancer risk among prospective cohorts in East Asia and now seek to validate the performance of these biomarkers in identifying individuals with premalignant lesions. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 1,402 individuals from Linqu County screened by upper endoscopy. H. pylori protein-specific antibody levels were assessed using multiplex serology. Multivariable-adjusted logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for prevalent intestinal metaplasia, indefinite dysplasia, or dysplasia, compared with superficial or mild atrophic gastritis. Results: Compared with individuals seronegative to Omp and HP0305, individuals seropositive to both were seven times more likely to have precancerous lesions (OR, 7.43; 95% CI, 5.59–9.88). A classification model for precancerous lesions that includes age, smoking, and seropositivity to H. pylori , Omp, and HP0305 resulted in an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.751 (95% CI, 0.725–0.777), which is significantly better than the same model, including the established gastric cancer risk factor CagA (AUC, 0.718; 95% CI, 0.691–0.746, P difference = 0.0002). Conclusions: The present study of prevalent precancerous gastric lesions provides support for two new serum biomarkers of gastric cancer risk, Omp and HP 0305. Impact: Our results support further research into the serological biomarkers Omp and HP0305 as possible improvements over the established virulence marker CagA for identifying individuals with precancerous lesions in East Asia.
    Print ISSN: 1055-9965
    Electronic ISSN: 1538-7755
    Topics: Medicine
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  • 6
    Publication Date: 2018-07-03
    Description: Purpose: ZIP4 is overexpressed in human pancreatic cancer and promotes tumor growth. However, little is known about the role of ZIP4 in advanced stages of this dismal neoplasm. Our goal is to study the underlying mechanism and define a novel signaling pathway controlled by ZIP4-modulating pancreatic tumor metastasis. Experimental Design: The expression of ZIP4, ZO-1, claudin-1, and ZEB1 in human pancreatic cancer tissues, genetically engineered mouse model, xenograft tumor model, and pancreatic cancer cell lines were examined, and the correlations between ZIP4 and those markers were also analyzed. Functional analysis of ZO-1, claudin-1, and ZEB1 was investigated in pancreatic cancer cell lines and orthotopic xenografts. Results: Genetic inactivation of ZIP4 inhibited migration and invasion in pancreatic cancer and increased the expression of ZO-1 and claudin-1. Conversely, overexpression of ZIP4 promoted migration and invasion and increased the expression of ZEB1 and downregulation of the aforementioned epithelial genes. ZIP4 downregulation of ZO-1 and claudin-1 requires the transcriptional repressor ZEB1. Further analysis demonstrated that ZIP4-mediated repression of ZO-1 and claudin-1 leads to upregulation of their targets FAK and Paxillin. Silencing of ZIP4 caused reduced phosphorylation of FAK and Paxillin, which was rescued by simultaneous blocking of ZO-1 or claudin-1. Clinically, we demonstrated that ZIP4 positively correlates with the levels of ZEB1 and inversely associates with the expression of ZO-1 and claudin-1. Conclusions: These findings suggest a novel pathway activated by ZIP4-controlling pancreatic cancer invasiveness and metastasis, which could serve as a new therapeutic target for this devastating disease. Clin Cancer Res; 24(13); 3186–96. ©2018 AACR .
    Print ISSN: 1078-0432
    Electronic ISSN: 1557-3265
    Topics: Medicine
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