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  • DKFZ Publication Database  (21)
  • AGE  (21)
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  • DKFZ Publication Database  (21)
  • 1
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; TRIAL ; hormone ; HEALTH ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; HORMONE REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; OBESITY ; risk factors ; COUNTRIES ; cancer risk ; RISK FACTOR ; EPIC ; EPIC study ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; MASS INDEX ; PH ; WEIGHT ; body weight ; fat distribution ; HEIGHT ; ADIPOSITY ; breast neoplasm ; HORMONE-REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; METAANALYSIS
    Abstract: The evidence for anthropometric factors influencing breast cancer risk is accumulating, but uncertainties remain concerning the role of fat distribution and potential effect modifiers. We used data from 73,542 premenopausal and 103,344 postmenopausal women from 9 European countries, taking part in the EPIC study. RRs from Cox regression models were calculated, using measured height, weight, BMI and waist and hip circumferences; categorized by cohort wide quintiles; and expressed as continuous variables, adjusted for study center, age and other risk factors. During 4.7 years of follow-up, 1,879 incident invasive breast cancers were identified. In postmenopausal women, current HRT modified the body size-breast cancer association. Among nonusers, weight, BMI and hip circumference were positively associated with breast cancer risk (all P-trend less than or equal to 0.002); obese women (BMI 〉 30) had a 31% excess risk compared to women with BMI 〈 25. Among HRT users, body measures were inversely but nonsignificantly associated with breast cancer. Excess breast cancer risk with HRT was particularly evident among lean women. Pooled RRs per height increment of 5 cm were 1.05 (95% CI 1.00-1.16) in premenopausal and 1.10 (95% CI 1.05-1.16) in postmenopausal women. Among premenopausal women, hip circumference was the only other measure significantly related to breast cancer (P-trend = 0.03), after accounting for BMI. In postmenopausal women not taking exogenous hormones, general obesity is a significant predictor of breast cancer, while abdominal fat assessed as waist-hip ratio or waist circumference was not related to excess risk when adjusted for BMI. Among premenopausal women, weight and BMI showed nonsignificant inverse associations with breast cancer. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15252848
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  • 2
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; MODEL ; FOLLOW-UP ; POPULATION ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; hormone ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; smoking ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; FISH ; FIBER ; COLON-CANCER ; DOSE-RESPONSE ; Jun ; DIET ; DIETARY ; UNITED-STATES ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; EPIC CALIBRATION ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; INTERVAL ; TESTS ; alcohol consumption ; MEAT INTAKE ; DIETARY CARCINOGENS ; GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY ; N-NITROSATION ; RED MEAT
    Abstract: Background. Current evidence suggests that high red meat intake is associated with increased colorectal cancer risk. High fish intake may be associated with a decreased risk, but the existing evidence is less convincing. Methods: We prospectively followed 478040 men and women from 10 European countries who were free of cancer at enrollment between 1992 and 1998. Information on diet and lifestyle was collected at baseline. After a mean follow-up of 4.8 years, 1329 incident colorectal cancers were documented. We examined the relationship between intakes of red and processed meat, poultry, and fish and colorectal cancer risk using a proportional hazards model adjusted for age, sex, energy (nonfat and fat sources), height, weight, work-related physical activity, smoking status, dietary fiber and folate, and alcohol consumption, stratified by center. A calibration substudy based on 36994 subjects was used to correct hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for diet measurement errors. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Colorectal cancer risk was positively associated with intake of red and processed meat (highest [〉 160 g/day] versus lowest [〈 20 g/day] intake, HR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.96 to 1.88; P-trend = .03) and inversely associated with intake of fish (〉 80 g/day versus 〈 10 g/day, HR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.54 to 0.88; P-trend 〈 .001), but was not related to poultry intake. Correcting for measurement error strengthened the associations between colorectal cancer and red and processed meat intake (per 100-g increase HR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.09 to 1.41, P-trend = .001 and HR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.02, P-trend = .001 before and after calibration, respectively) and for fish (per 100 g increase HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.57 to 0.87, P-trend 〈 .001 and HR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.27 to 0.77, P-trend = .003; before and after correction, respectively). In this study population, the absolute risk of development of colorectal cancer within 10 years for a study subject aged 50 years was 1.71% for the highest category of red and processed meat intake and 1.28% for the lowest category of intake and was 1.86% for subjects in the lowest category of fish intake and 1.28% for subjects in the highest category of fish intake. Conclusions: Our data confirm that colorectal cancer risk is positively associated with high consumption of red and processed meat and support an inverse association with fish intake
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15956652
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; Germany ; RISK ; METABOLISM ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; DESIGN ; NUMBER ; AGE ; WOMEN ; REPRODUCIBILITY ; etiology ; cancer risk ; EPIC ; nutrition ; ESTRADIOL ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM ; ONCOLOGY ; REGRESSION ; ESTROGEN ; LEVEL ; analysis ; PHASE ; PREMENOPAUSAL ; TESTOSTERONE ; prospective ; STEROID-HORMONES ; VARIABLES ; CANCER-RISK ; BINDING GLOBULIN ; ENGLAND ; steroids ; SEX-HORMONES ; postmenopausal ; androgens ; FREE TESTOSTERONE ; ESTROGENS
    Abstract: Epidemiological data show that reproductive and hormonal factors are involved in the etiology of endometrial cancer, but there is little data on the association with endogenous sex hormone levels. We analyzed the association between prediagnostic serum concentrations of sex steroids and endometrial cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition using a nested case-control design of 247 incident endometrial cancer cases and 481 controls, matched on center, menopausal status, age, variables relating to blood collection, and, for premenopausal women, phase of menstrual cycle. Using conditional regression analysis, endometrial cancer risk among postmenopausal women was positively associated with increasing levels of total testosterone, free testosterone, estrone, total estradiol, and free estradiol. The odds ratios (ORs) for the highest versus lowest tertile were 2.66 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.50-4.72; P=0.002 for a continuous linear trend) for estrone, 2.07 (95% Cl 1.20-3.60; P=0.001) for estradiol, and 1.66 (95% Cl 0.98-2.82; P=0.001) for free estradiol. For total and free testosterone, ORs for the highest versus lowest tertile were 1.44 (95% Cl 0.88-2.36; P=0.05) and 2.05 (95% Cl 1.23-3.42; P=0.005) respectively. Androstenedione and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate were not associated with risk. Sex hormone-binding globulin was significantly inversely associated with risk (OR for the highest versus lowest tertile was 0.57, 95% Cl 0.34-0.95; P=0.004). In premenopausal women, serum sex hormone concentrations were not clearly associated with endometrial cancer risk, but numbers were too small to draw firm conclusions. In conclusion, relatively high blood concentrations of estrogens and free testosterone are associated with an increased endometrial cancer risk in postmenopausal women
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18509001
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  • 4
    Keywords: AGE ; WOMEN ; ESTROGEN-RECEPTOR ; ORAL-CONTRACEPTIVE USE ; ASSOCIATIONS ; HEIGHT ; METAANALYSIS ; REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; menarche
    Abstract: Background: The association of reproductive factors with hormone receptor (HR)-negative breast tumors remains uncertain. Methods: Within the EPIC cohort, Cox proportional hazards models were used to describe the relationships of reproductive factors (menarcheal age, time between menarche and first pregnancy, parity, number of children, age at first and last pregnancies, time since last full-term childbirth, breastfeeding, age at menopause, ever having an abortion and use of oral contraceptives [OC]) with risk of ER-PR-(n = 998) and ER+PR+ (n = 3,567) breast tumors. Results: A later first full-term childbirth was associated with increased risk of ER+PR+ tumors but not with risk of ER-PR-tumors (= 35 vs. = 19 years HR: 1.47 [95% CI 1.15-1.88] p(trend) 〈 0.001 for ER+PR+ tumors; = 35 vs. = 19 years HR: 0.93 [95% CI 0.53-1.65] p(trend) = 0.96 for ER-PR-tumors; P-het = 0.03). The risk associations of menarcheal age, and time period between menarche and first full-term childbirth with ER-PR-tumors were in the similar direction with risk of ER+PR+ tumors (p(het) = 0.50), although weaker in magnitude and statistically only borderline significant. Other parity related factors such as ever a full-term birth, number of births, age-and time since last birth were associated only with ER+PR+ malignancies, however no statistical heterogeneity between breast cancer subtypes was observed. Breastfeeding and OC use were generally not associated with breast cancer subtype risk. Conclusion: Our study provides possible evidence that age at menarche, and time between menarche and first full-term childbirth may be associated with the etiology of both HR-negative and HR-positive malignancies, although the associations with HR-negative breast cancer were only borderline significant.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24321460
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; RISK ; ENZYMES ; GENE ; GENES ; ACTIVATION ; DNA ; CARCINOGENESIS ; GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; AGE ; CIGARETTE-SMOKING ; COUNTRIES ; GENOTYPES ; COLORECTAL CANCERS ; LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM ; adenocarcinoma ; case-control studies ; TOBACCO ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; nutrition ; SMOKERS ; case-control study ; VARIANT ; TOBACCO-SMOKE ; GSTM1 ; GSTT1 ; gastric cancer ; S-TRANSFERASE M1 ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; ENZYME ; GENETIC-POLYMORPHISM ; LOCUS ; FAMILY-HISTORY ; prospective ; ALLELE FREQUENCIES ; COMPOUND ; EPOXIDE HYDROLASE POLYMORPHISMS ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; HIGH-INCIDENCE AREA ; INCREASED RISK ; NEVER SMOKERS ; odds ratio ; T1 NULL GENOTYPES ; tobacco smoke ; UNIT
    Abstract: Metabolizing enzymes, which often display genetic polymorphisms, are involved in the activation of compounds present in tobacco smoke that may be relevant to gastric carcinogenesis. We report the results of a study looking at the association between risk of gastric adenocarcinoma and polymorphisms in genes CYP1A1, CYP1A2, EPHX1, and GSTT1. A nested case-control study was carried out within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, developed in 10 European countries. The study includes 243 newly diagnosed cases of histologically confirmed gastric adenocarcinoma and 946 controls matched by center, age, sex, and date of blood collection. Genotypes were determined in nuclear DNA from WBCs. We found an increased risk of gastric cancer for homozygotes for C (histidine) variant in Y113H of EPHX1 (odds ratio, 1.91; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-3.07) compared with subjects with TC/TT. There was also a significant increased risk for smokers carrying at least one variant allele A in Ex7+129C 〉 A (m4) of CYP1A1 and never smokers with null GSTT1 and allele A in the locus -3859G 〉 A of CYP1A2. Most of these genes are involved in the activation and detoxification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, suggesting a potential role of these compounds in gastric carcinogenesis
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17164366
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; PROSTATE ; FOLLOW-UP ; DISEASE ; RISK ; RISKS ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; HEALTH ; DESIGN ; PLASMA ; AGE ; MEN ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; RECRUITMENT ; DIETARY ; ALCOHOL ; BODY ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; tocopherols ; RELATIVE RISK ; BETA-CAROTENE ; VITAMIN-E ; HETEROGENEITY ; physical activity ; ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL ; carotenoids ; LYCOPENE ; MASS INDEX ; MASSES ; RETINOL ; SERUM ; BODIES ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; CARDIOVASCULAR-DISEASE ; SUPPLEMENTATION ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; LEVEL ; USA ; prospective ; UNIT ; CANCER-RISK ; GAMMA-TOCOPHEROL ; nested case-control study ; micronutrients ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; BODY-MASS ; BODY-MASS-INDEX
    Abstract: Background: Previous studies suggest that high plasma concentrations of carotenoids, retinol, or tocopherols may reduce the risk of prostate cancer. Objective: We aimed to examine the associations between plasma concentrations of 7 carotenoids, retinol, a-tocopherol, and,gamma-tocopherol and prostate cancer risk. Design: A total of 137 001 men in 8 European countries participated. After a mean of 6 y, 966 incident cases of prostate cancer with plasma were available. A total of 1064 control subjects were selected and were matched for study center, age, and date of recruitment. The relative risk of prostate cancer was estimated by conditional logistic regression, which was adjusted for smoking status, alcohol intake, body mass index, marital status, physical activity, and education level. Results: Overall, none of the micronutrients examined were significantly associated with prostate cancer risk. For lycopene and the sum of carotenoids, there was evidence of heterogeneity between the associations with risks of localized and advanced disease. These carotenoids were not associated with the risk of localized disease but were inversely associated with the risk of advanced disease. The risk of advanced disease for men in the highest fifth of plasma concentrations compared with men in the lowest fifth was 0.40 (95% CI: 0. 19, 0.88) for lycopene and 0.35 (95% CI: 0. 17, 0.78) for the sum of carotenoids. Conclusions: We observed no associations between plasma concentrations of carotenoids, retinol, or tocopherols and overall prostate cancer risk. The inverse associations of lycopene and the sum of carotenoids with the risk of advanced disease may involve a protective effect, an association of dietary choice with delayed detection of prostate cancer, reverse causality, or other factors
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17823432
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  • 7
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; THERAPY ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; breast cancer ; BREAST-CANCER ; NO ; HEALTH ; DESIGN ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; REPRODUCIBILITY ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; cancer risk ; MEASUREMENT ERROR ; DIETARY ; CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; TRENDS ; FOOD-FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; THERAPIES ; INCREASE ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; EPIC PROJECT ; HORMONE-REPLACEMENT THERAPY ; RELATIVE VALIDITY ; USA ; prospective ; CANCER-RISK ; NOV ; postmenopausal ; RATIO ; energy intake ; breast cancer risk ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; hazard ratio ; hormone therapy
    Abstract: Background: Epidemiologic studies have produced conflicting results with respect to an association of dietary fat with breast cancer. Objective: We aimed to investigate the association between fat consumption and breast cancer. Design: We prospectively investigated fat consumption in a large (n = 319 826), geographically and culturally heterogeneous cohort of European women enrolled in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition who completed a dietary questionnaire. After a mean of 8.8 y of follow-up, 7119 women developed breast cancer. Cox proportional hazard models, stratified by age and center and adjusted for energy intake and confounders, were used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) for breast cancer. Results: An association between high saturated fat intake and greater breast cancer risk was found [HR = 1.13 (95% CI: 1.00, 1.27; P for trend = 0.038) for the highest quintile of saturated fat intake compared with the lowest quintile: 1.02 (1.00, 1.04) for a 20% increase in saturated fat consumption (continuous variable)]. No significant association of breast cancer with total, monounsaturated, or polyunsaturated fat was found, although trends were for a direct association of risk with monounsaturated fat and an inverse association with polyunsaturated fat. In menopausal women, the positive association with saturated fat was confined to nonusers of hormone therapy at baseline [1.21 (0.99, 1.48) for the highest quintile compared with the lowest quintile; P for trend = 0.044; and 1.03 (1.00, 1.07) for a 20% increase in saturated fat as a continuous variable]. Conclusions: Evidence indicates a weak positive association between saturated fat intake and breast cancer risk. This association was more pronounced for postmenopausal women who never used hormone therapy. Am J Clin Nutr 2008; 88: 1304-12
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18996867
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; PROSTATE ; SUPPORT ; RISK ; RISKS ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; ASSOCIATION ; PLASMA ; AGE ; MEN ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; case-control studies ; nutrition ; NESTED CASE-CONTROL ; HETEROGENEITY ; isoflavones ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; GENISTEIN CONTENT ; prospective ; ENTEROLACTONE ; phytoestrogens ; lignan ; DAIDZEIN ; genistein ; JAPANESE MEN ; RECEPTOR-ALPHA ; isoflavone ; SOY PRODUCT
    Abstract: We examined plasma concentrations of phyto-oestrogens in relation to risk for subsequent prostate cancer in a case-control study nested in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Concentrations of isoflavones genistein, daidzein and equol, and that of lignans enterolactone and enterodiol, were measured in plasma samples for 950 prostate cancer cases and 1042 matched control participants. Relative risks (RRs) for prostate cancer in relation to plasma concentrations of these phyto-oestrogens were estimated by conditional logistic regression. Higher plasma concentrations of genistein were associated with lower risk of prostate cancer: RR among men in the highest vs the lowest fifth, 0.71 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.53-0.96, P trend = 0.03). After adjustment for potential confounders this RR was 0.74 (95% CI 0.54-1.00, P trend = 0.05). No statistically significant associations were observed for circulating concentrations of daidzein, equol, enterolactone or enterodiol in relation to overall risk for prostate cancer. There was no evidence of heterogeneity in these results by age at blood collection or country of recruitment, nor by cancer stage or grade. These results suggest that higher concentrations of circulating genistein may reduce the risk of prostate cancer but do not support an association with plasma lignans. British Journal of Cancer (2009) 100, 1817-1823. doi: 10.1038/sj.bjc.6605073 www.bjcancer.com Published online 12 May 2009 (C) 2009 Cancer Research UK
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19436304
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; RISK ; GENE ; GENES ; DNA ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; HEALTH ; AGE ; adenocarcinoma ; STOMACH-CANCER ; METHYLATION ; nutrient intake ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI INFECTION ; prospective ; PERNICIOUS-ANEMIA ; MTHFR POLYMORPHISMS ; ATROPHIC GASTRITIS ; Genetic ; FOLATE-DEFICIENCY ; HOMOCYSTEINE METABOLISM ; METHYLENETETRAHYDROFOLATE-REDUCTASE ; UPPER GASTROINTESTINAL-TRACT
    Abstract: B vitamins and polymorphisms in genes coding for enzymes involved in one-carbon metabolism may affect DNA synthesis and methylation and thereby be implicated in carcinogenesis. Previous data on vitamins B2 and B6 and genetic polymorphisms other than those involving MTHFR as risk factors for gastric cancer (GC) are sparse and inconsistent. In this case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort, cases (n = 235) and controls (n = 601) were matched for study center, age, sex, and time of blood sampling. B2 and B6 species were measured in plasma, and the sum of riboflavin and flavin mononucleotide was used as the main exposure variable for vitamin 132 status, whereas the sum of pyridoxal 5'-phosphate, pyridoxal, and 4-pyridoxic acid was used to define vitamin B6 status. In addition, we determined eight polymorphisms related to one-carbon metabolism. Relative risks for CC risk were calculated with conditional logistic regression, adjusted for Helicobacter pylori infection status and smoking status. Adjusted relative risks per quartile (95% confidence interval, P-trend) were 0.85 (0.72-1.01, 0.06) for vitamin B2 and 0.78 (0.65-0.93, 〈0.01) for vitamin B6. Both relations were stronger in individuals with severe chronic atrophic gastritis. The polymorphisms were not associated with CC risk and did not modify the observed vitamin-cancer associations. In summary, results from this large European cohort study showed an inverse association between vitamin B2 and CC risk, which is borderline significant, and a significant inverse association between vitamin B6 and CC risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev; 19(1); 28-38. (C)2010 AACR
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20056620
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  • 10
    Keywords: prevention ; HEALTH ; AGE ; VALIDITY ; ESTROGEN-RECEPTOR ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; exercise ; BODY-SIZE ; ACTIVITY QUESTIONNAIRE ; REPEATABILITY
    Abstract: Physical activity is associated with reduced risks of invasive breast cancer. However, whether this holds true for breast cancer subtypes defined by the estrogen receptor (ER) and the progesterone receptor (PR) status is controversial. The study included 257,805 women from the multinational EPIC-cohort study with detailed information on occupational, recreational and household physical activity and important cofactors assessed at baseline. During 11.6 years of median follow-up, 8,034 incident invasive breast cancer cases were identified. Data on ER, PR and combined ER/PR expression were available for 6,007 (67.6%), 4,814 (54.2%) and 4,798 (53.9%) cases, respectively. Adjusted hazard ratios (HR) were estimated by proportional hazards models. Breast cancer risk was inversely associated with moderate and high levels of total physical activity (HR = 0.92, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.860.99, HR = 0.87, 95%-CI: 0.790.97, respectively; p-trend = 0.002), compared to the lowest quartile. Among women diagnosed with breast cancer after age 50, the largest risk reduction was found with highest activity (HR = 0.86, 95%-CI: 0.770.97), whereas for cancers diagnosed before age 50 strongest associations were found for moderate total physical activity (HR = 0.78, 95%-CI: 0.640.94). Analyses by hormone receptor status suggested differential associations for total physical activity (p-heterogeneity = 0.04), with a somewhat stronger inverse relationship for ER+/PR+ breast tumors, primarily driven by PR+ tumors (p-heterogeneity 〈 0.01). Household physical activity was inversely associated with ER/PR tumors. The results of this largest prospective study on the protective effects of physical activity indicate that moderate and high physical activity are associated with modest decreased breast cancer risk. Heterogeneities by receptor status indicate hormone-related mechanisms.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22903273
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