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  • 1
    Keywords: measurement ; CANCER ; Germany ; COHORT ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; PLASMA ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; MALES ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; MARKERS ; SWEDEN ; REGION ; REGIONS ; NETHERLANDS ; ALCOHOL ; GREECE ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; EUROPE ; antioxidants ; DENMARK ; BETA-CAROTENE ; VITAMIN-E ; ALPHA-TOCOPHEROL ; alpha-carotene ; beta-cryptoxanthin ; carotenoids ; lutein ; LYCOPENE ; MASS INDEX ; MASSES ; PERFORMANCE LIQUID-CHROMATOGRAPHY ; RETINOL ; SEASONAL-VARIATION ; SERUM CONCENTRATIONS ; zeaxanthin
    Abstract: Background: In addition to their possible direct biological effects, plasma carotenoids can be used as biochemical markers of fruit and vegetable consumption for identifying diet-disease associations in epidemiological studies. Few studies have compared levels of these carotenoids between countries in Europe. Objective: Our aim was to assess the variability of plasma carotenoid levels within the cohort of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Methods: Plasma levels of six carotenoids-alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lycopene, lutein and zeaxanthin-were measured cross-sectionally in 3043 study subjects from 16 regions in nine European countries. We investigated the relative influence of gender, season, age, body mass index (BMI), alcohol intake and smoking status on plasma levels of the carotenoids. Results: Mean plasma level of the sum of the six carotenoids varied twofold between regions (1.35 mumol l(-1) for men in Malmo, Sweden vs. 2.79 mumol l(-1) for men in Ragusa/Naples, Italy; 1.61 mumol l(-1) for women in The Netherlands vs. 3.52 mumol l(-1) in Ragusa/Naples, Italy). Mean levels of individual carotenoids varied up to fourfold (alpha-carotene: 0.06 mumol l(-1) for men in Murcia, Spain vs. 0.25 mumol l(-1) for vegetarian men living in the UK). In multivariate regression analyses, region was the most important predictor of total plasma carotenoid level (partial R-2=27.3%), followed by BMI (partial R-2=5.2%), gender (partial R-2=2.7%) and smoking status (partial R-2=2.8%). Females had higher total carotenoid levels than males across Europe. Conclusions: Plasma levels of carotenoids vary substantially between 16 different regions in Italy, Greece, Spain, France, Germany, the UK, Sweden, Denmark and The Netherlands. Compared with region of residence, the other demographic and lifestyle factors and laboratory measurements have limited predictive value for plasma carotenoid levels in Europe
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15369608
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; tumor ; Germany ; human ; INFORMATION ; NEW-YORK ; POPULATION ; RISK ; TUMORS ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; AGE ; POPULATIONS ; UNITED-STATES ; urinary estrogen metabolites ; FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; AGE 50 ; GENISTEIN CONTENT ; PHYTO-ESTROGENS ; RECEPTOR-POSITIVE TUMORS ; RELATIVE VALIDITY ; SERUM ENTEROLACTONE CONCENTRATION ; WESTERN DISEASES
    Abstract: A diet high in isoflavonoids (soy) is associated with lower breast cancer risk in Asian populations. Due to the low soy intake, dietary lignans may be the more important phytoestrogen class in Western populations. We used a population-based case-control study of breast cancer by age 50 in southern Germany to evaluate the association between dietary intake of different phytoestrogens and premenopausal breast cancer risk. Dietary information was collected from 278 premenopausal cases and 666 age-matched controls, using a validated FFQ. Using multivariate logistic regression, the highest vs. lowest intake quartiles of daidzein and genistein yielded significantly reduced ORs (95% CI) for breast cancer risk of 0.62 (0.40-0.95) and 0.47 (0.29-0.74), respectively. The protective effects of daidzein and genistein were found only for hormone receptor-positive tumors. High intake of other isoflavonoids, e.g., formorionetin and biochanin A, as well as the sum of isoflavonoids were not associated with a decrease in risk. Breast cancer risk significantly decreased with a high intake of the plant lignan matairesinol (OR = 0.58, 95% CI 0.37-0.94) but not secoisolariciresinol or the sum of plant lignans. However, both estimated mammalian lignans, enterodiol and enterolactone, were inversely associated with breast cancer risk, with ORs (95% CI) of 0.61 (0.39-0.98) and 0.57 (0.35-0.92), respectively. No effect was found for total phytoestrogen intake. Our results suggest an important role of dietary intake of daidzein and genistein, despite low levels, as well as of matairesinol and mammalian lignans to reduce premenopausal breast cancer risk in this study population. (C) 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15069695
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  • 3
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; MODEL ; FOLLOW-UP ; POPULATION ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; hormone ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; colorectal cancer ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; smoking ; COLORECTAL-CANCER ; cancer risk ; FISH ; FIBER ; COLON-CANCER ; DOSE-RESPONSE ; Jun ; DIET ; DIETARY ; UNITED-STATES ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; EPIC CALIBRATION ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; INTERVAL ; TESTS ; alcohol consumption ; MEAT INTAKE ; DIETARY CARCINOGENS ; GENETIC SUSCEPTIBILITY ; N-NITROSATION ; RED MEAT
    Abstract: Background. Current evidence suggests that high red meat intake is associated with increased colorectal cancer risk. High fish intake may be associated with a decreased risk, but the existing evidence is less convincing. Methods: We prospectively followed 478040 men and women from 10 European countries who were free of cancer at enrollment between 1992 and 1998. Information on diet and lifestyle was collected at baseline. After a mean follow-up of 4.8 years, 1329 incident colorectal cancers were documented. We examined the relationship between intakes of red and processed meat, poultry, and fish and colorectal cancer risk using a proportional hazards model adjusted for age, sex, energy (nonfat and fat sources), height, weight, work-related physical activity, smoking status, dietary fiber and folate, and alcohol consumption, stratified by center. A calibration substudy based on 36994 subjects was used to correct hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for diet measurement errors. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Colorectal cancer risk was positively associated with intake of red and processed meat (highest [〉 160 g/day] versus lowest [〈 20 g/day] intake, HR = 1.35, 95% CI = 0.96 to 1.88; P-trend = .03) and inversely associated with intake of fish (〉 80 g/day versus 〈 10 g/day, HR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.54 to 0.88; P-trend 〈 .001), but was not related to poultry intake. Correcting for measurement error strengthened the associations between colorectal cancer and red and processed meat intake (per 100-g increase HR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.09 to 1.41, P-trend = .001 and HR = 1.55, 95% CI = 1.19 to 2.02, P-trend = .001 before and after calibration, respectively) and for fish (per 100 g increase HR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.57 to 0.87, P-trend 〈 .001 and HR = 0.46, 95% CI = 0.27 to 0.77, P-trend = .003; before and after correction, respectively). In this study population, the absolute risk of development of colorectal cancer within 10 years for a study subject aged 50 years was 1.71% for the highest category of red and processed meat intake and 1.28% for the lowest category of intake and was 1.86% for subjects in the lowest category of fish intake and 1.28% for subjects in the highest category of fish intake. Conclusions: Our data confirm that colorectal cancer risk is positively associated with high consumption of red and processed meat and support an inverse association with fish intake
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15956652
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; LUNG ; EMPHYSEMA ; FOLLOW-UP ; lung cancer ; LUNG-CANCER ; NETWORKS ; DEATH ; DISEASE ; DNA adducts ; EXPOSURE ; RISK ; GENES ; TIME ; DNA ; AIR-POLLUTION ; ASSOCIATION ; POLYMORPHISMS ; AGE ; REPAIR ; smoking ; leukemia ; bladder cancer ; BLADDER-CANCER ; cancer risk ; DAMAGE ; POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC-HYDROCARBONS ; DNA-DAMAGE ; RECRUITMENT ; ADDUCTS ; case-control studies ; EPIC ; nutrition ; QUESTIONNAIRE ; WHITE BLOOD-CELLS ; DNA-ADDUCTS ; case-control study ; DETERMINANTS ; monitoring ; GSTM1 ; LEVEL ; ADDUCT ; case control studies ; INTERVAL ; DNA damage ; DNA ADDUCT ; ABILITY ; GENDER ; OUTDOOR AIR-POLLUTION ; OZONE
    Abstract: Objectives were to investigate prospectively the ability of DNA adducts to predict cancer and to study the determinants of adducts, especially air pollutants. DNA adducts were measured in a case-control study nested in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC investigation. Cases included newly diagnosed lung cancer (n = 115), upper respiratory cancers (pharynx and larynx, n 82), bladder cancer (n = 124), leukemia (n = 166), and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or emphysema deaths (n = 77) accrued after a median follow-up of 7 years among the EPIC former smokers and never-smokers. Three controls per case were matched for questionnaire analyses and two controls per case for laboratory analyses. Matching criteria were gender, age, smoking status, country of recruitment, and follow-up time. Individual exposure to air pollution was assessed using concentration data from monitoring stations in routine air quality monitoring networks. Leukocyte DNA adducts were analyzed blindly using (32)p postlabeling technique. Adducts were associated with the subsequent risk of lung cancer, with an odds ratio (OR) of 1.86 [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.88-3.931 when comparing detectable versus nondetectable adducts. The association with lung cancer was stronger in never-smokers (OR, 4.04; 95% CI, 1.06-15.42) and among the younger age groups. After exclusion of the cancers occurring in the first 36 months of follow-up, the OR was 4.16 (95% CI, 1.24-13.88). A positive association was found between DNA adducts and ozone (O-3) concentration. Our prospective study suggests that leukocyte DNA adducts may predict lung cancer risk of never-smokers. Besides, the association of DNA adduct levels with O-3 indicates a possible role for photochemical smog in determining DNA damage
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16140979
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; tumor ; CELL ; Germany ; liver ; SAMPLE ; SAMPLES ; TISSUE ; TUMORS ; SURGERY ; PATIENT ; IMPACT ; ACID ; ACIDS ; MALIGNANCIES ; PATTERNS ; PLASMA ; AGE ; GAS ; fatty acids ; DIET ; IMPROVES ; SMALL-INTESTINE ; nutrition ; COMPLICATIONS ; FATTY-ACID ; MALIGNANCY ; PATTERN ; FRACTION ; LEADS ; PHOSPHOLIPIDS ; WEIGHT ; SUPPLEMENTATION ; TUMOR TISSUE ; LEVEL ; methods ; PLASMA-LEVELS ; TISSUE SAMPLES ; USA ; phospholipid ; uptake ; EICOSAPENTAENOIC ACID ; ENTERAL NUTRITION ; EVALUATE ; GUT ; IMMUNONUTRITION ; MAJOR SURGERY ; PARENTERAL FISH-OIL ; POSTOPERATIVE TRAUMA ; TREATED RATS
    Abstract: Background: The uptake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) into the liver, gut mucosa, and tumor tissue and plasma levels after preoperative administration of supplemented enteral nutrition was investigated in patients with malignancies of the upper gastrointestinal tract. The objective of the study was to evaluate the incorporation of preoperatively administrated PUFAs, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) into cell phospholipids. Methods: Patients undergoing major gastrointestinal surgery (n = 40) were prospectively randomized to receive a PUFA-supplemented liquid oral diet 5 days preoperatively or an isocaloric control diet. The planned diet intake was 1000 mL/d providing 3.7 g of PUFA. The diet was given in addition to the usual hospital diet. The phospholipid fractions in plasma were analyzed on the day of surgery. Tissue samples of liver, gut mucosa (small intestine), and tumor were taken during surgery and homogenized. EPA and DHA content was analyzed using liquid gas chromatography. Results: Both patient groups (PUFA group: n = 20; control group: n = 20) were similar in age, weight, and surgical procedures. As compared with the control group, the PUFA group had significantly increased levels of EPA in liver tissue (0.4 vs 1.3 weight %), gut mucosa (0.3 vs 1.0 weight %), and tumor tissue (0.3 vs 0.8 weight %). Also, the DHA levels in the PUFA group were significantly higher than the control group: liver tissue (4.1 vs 7.5 weight %), gut mucosa (2.1 vs 3.7 weight %) and tumor tissue (1.9 vs 4.2 weight %). Conclusions: This study suggests that administration of PUFA-enriched diets leads to increased incorporation of EPA and DHA not only in liver and gut mucosa tissue, but also in tumor tissue in patients with solid gastrointestinal tumors. Thus, preoperative administration of oral PUFA-enriched diets could have an impact on the postoperative inflammatory response after major abdominal surgery
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15961678
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  • 6
    Keywords: Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; VOLUME ; POPULATION ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; smoking ; DOSE-RESPONSE ; DIETARY ; body mass index ; FOOD ; asthma ; EAST-GERMANY ; MASSES ; ADULT ; ADULTS ; RE ; SODIUM ; ECRHS ; HEALTH-SURVEY ; RESPONSIVENESS ; SALT ; european community respiratory health survey ; AIRWAY HYPERREACTIVITY ; bronchial hyperresponsiveness ; DIETARY-SODIUM ; HISTAMINE ; METHACHOLINE
    Abstract: Background: Several investigations suggested a relationship between sodium intake and asthma and bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR), respectively. However, clinical and epidemiological studies did not show consistent finding. Objective: We analysed the association between dietary sodium intake and BHR to methacholine among 613 adults aged 20-65 years as one of the two German centres of the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS). Methods: Dietary sodium intake was estimated from a 3-day weighed record of food intake. We applied multiple logistic regression models contrasting the three higher quartites of sodium intake versus the lowest to assess the risk of BHR and mild BHR estimated by PD20 and PD10, respectively, controlling for potential confounders and stratified for sex. In addition, we analysed PD20 (dose of methachotine causing a fall of 20% in forced expiratory volume in 1 s) as continuous variable expressed as transformed dose-response slope (tDRS) in the linear model. Results: Women were as expected more likely to be bronchial hyperresponsive (PD2.0: 26.1%; PD10: 52.2%) than men (PD20:15.8%; PD10: 34.8%) and had a lower mean daily sodium intake (2.36 g) compared with men (3.15 g). Logistic regression did not show any significant relationship between sodium intake and BHR in terms of PD20 after adjustment for age group, education, smoking status, body mass index and height in men or women. However, mild BHR assessed as PD10 was statistically significant positively related to the third (OR: 2.35; CI: 1.11-5.00) and highest quartite of sodium intake (OR: 2.28; CI: 1.06-4.88) in women, but not in men for third quartile (OR: 1.29; Cl: 0.68-2.44) and for fourth quartile (OR: 1.07; Cl: 0.56-2.07), respectively. Conclusion: Sodium intake by several food items does not alter BHR assessed as PD20 to methacholine but may increase mild BHR assessed as PD10. We conclude that, in addition, PD10 has to be considered when the effect of sodium intake on BHR is studied. (c) 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 15939248
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; DISEASE ; MORTALITY ; RISK ; RISKS ; AGE ; WOMEN ; OBESITY ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; TOBACCO ; GLUCOSE ; BODY ; DIABETES-MELLITUS ; nutrition ; pancreatic cancer ; RELATIVE RISK ; physical activity ; MASS INDEX ; PANCREATIC-CANCER ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; HEIGHT ; WAIST ; INTERVAL ; pancreatic ; INSULIN-RESISTANCE ; PARTICIPANTS ; anthropometry ; prospective ; RISK-FACTOR ; BODY-FAT DISTRIBUTION ; hip ; MALE SMOKERS
    Abstract: Tobacco smoking is the only established risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Results from several epidemiologic studies have suggested that increased body mass index and/or lack of physical activity may be associated with an increased risk of this disease. We examined the relationship between anthropometry and physical activity recorded at baseline and the risk of pancreatic cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (n = 438,405 males and females age 19-84 years and followed for a total of 2,826,070 person-years). Relative risks (RR) were calculated using Cox proportional hazards models stratified by age, sex, and country and adjusted for smoking and self-reported diabetes and, where appropriate, height. In total, there were 324 incident cases of pancreatic cancer diagnosed in the cohort over an average of 6 years of follow-up. There was evidence that the RR of pancreatic cancer was associated with increased height [RR, 1.74; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.20-2.52] for highest quartile compared with lowest quartile (P-trend = 0.001). However, this trend was primarily due to a low risk in the lowest quartile, as when this group was excluded, the trend was no longer statistically significant (P = 0.27). A larger waist-to-hip ratio and waist circumference were both associated with an increased risk of developing the disease (RR per 0.1, 1.24; 95% CI, 1.04-1.48; P-trend = 0.02 and RR per 10 cm, 1.13; 95% CI, 1.01-1.26; P-trend = 0.03, respectively). There was a nonsignificant increased risk of pancreatic cancer with increasing body mass index (RR, 1.09; 95% CI, 0.95-1.24 per 5 kg/m(2)), and a nonsignificant decreased risk with total physical activity (RR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.50-1.35 for most active versus inactive). Future studies should consider including measurements of waist and hip circumference, to further investigate the relationship between central adiposity and the risk of pancreatic cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16702364
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; evaluation ; Germany ; LUNG-CANCER ; screening ; COHORT ; cohort studies ; cohort study ; DISEASE ; DISEASES ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; TIME ; CONTRAST ; ASSOCIATION ; ACID ; NO ; cancer prevention ; lifestyle ; DIFFERENCE ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; COUNTRIES ; PRODUCT ; RECRUITMENT ; DIET ; DIETARY ; FAT ; UNITED-STATES ; PREVALENCE ; CONSUMPTION ; meat ; nutrition ; BETA-CAROTENE ; FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; LEISURE-TIME ; ASSOCIATIONS ; RE ; PRODUCTS ; SUPPLEMENT ; HIGH PREVALENCE ; SUPPLEMENTATION ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; EPIC PROJECT ; RELATIVE VALIDITY ; LEVEL ; methods ; VITAMIN-C ; VITAMINS ; NO ASSOCIATION ; EPIC-Heidelberg ; PEOPLE ; - ; German ; milk ; FRENCH-WOMEN ; MINERAL SUPPLEMENTS ; nutrient supplements
    Abstract: Background The use of dietary supplements is often associated with a healthy lifestyle. Due to high variation in supplementation practice by country, these associations will be investigated in a large German cohort study. Aim of the study To describe the prevalence of dietary supplement use in the EPIC-Heidelberg cohort and to illuminate differences in health-relevant characteristics between regular users and non-users. Methods At cohort recruitment, 13,615 women aged 35-65 and 11,929 men aged 40-65 were asked for regular dietary supplementation over the past year. Results Regular use of any supplement was reported by 47% of the women and 41% of the men, vitamin or mineral supplements were taken by 40% and 33%, respectively. The use of vitamin and/or mineral supplements was significantly associated with higher age, being non- or ex-smoker, lower BMI, higher physical leisure time activity, and higher educational level. After adjustment for these factors, we observed positive associations between supplement use and the consumption of milk, milk products, and fish as well as the intake of vitamin C and beta-carotene. In contrast, the supplement use was related to lower meat and meat product consumption, saturated fat intake, and n6/n3-fatty acid ratio in the diet, both in women and men. Except for Hemoccult((R)) testing in women, no association with participation in cancer screening was observed. Conclusion The high prevalence of supplement use in EPIC-Heidelberg was associated with several presumably healthier lifestyle and diet characteristics. This needs to be considered in further evaluations of the risk of chronic diseases
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17377829
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; Germany ; COHORT ; RISK ; MICE ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; AGE ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; WOMEN ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; VALIDITY ; nutrition ; dehydroepiandrosterone ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; DETERMINANTS ; development ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; SERUM-LEVELS ; SULFATE ; HORMONES ; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE-SULFATE ; TESTOSTERONE ; prospective ; STEROID-HORMONES ; INCREASED RISK ; odds ratio ; CANCER-RISK ; OVARIAN ; BODY-MASS-INDEX
    Abstract: Few epidemiologic studies have examined the hypothesis that circulating androgens are involved in the development of ovarian cancer. We investigated the association between prediagnostic serum levels of androgens and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and ovarian cancer risk in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. One hundred and ninety-two ovarian cancer cases and 346 matched controls not using exogenous hormones at baseline blood donation were eligible for the study. Serum levels of testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and SHBG were measured by direct immunoassays. Free testosterone (fT) was calculated according to mass action laws. Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios adjusted for possible confounders. Overall, there was no association between serum concentrations of androgens or SHBG and ovarian cancer risk. In postmenopausal women, fT concentrations were inversely related to risk [highest versus lowest tertile odds ratio 0.45 (0.24-0.86); P-trend = 0-01]. Among women diagnosed before the age of 55 years, there was a negative association with SHBG and a positive association with fT and ovarian cancer risk, although these associations were not statistically significant. The present study suggests that circulating androgens and SHBG levels are not strongly associated with ovarian cancer risk, although levels of fT may be associated with an increased risk among women diagnosed at relatively young age. The heterogeneity of results on the associations of fT with ovarian cancer risk in postmenopausal women deserves further investigation
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17220328
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; Germany ; RISK ; METABOLISM ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; DESIGN ; NUMBER ; AGE ; WOMEN ; REPRODUCIBILITY ; etiology ; cancer risk ; EPIC ; nutrition ; ESTRADIOL ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM ; ONCOLOGY ; REGRESSION ; ESTROGEN ; LEVEL ; analysis ; PHASE ; PREMENOPAUSAL ; TESTOSTERONE ; prospective ; STEROID-HORMONES ; VARIABLES ; CANCER-RISK ; BINDING GLOBULIN ; ENGLAND ; steroids ; SEX-HORMONES ; postmenopausal ; androgens ; FREE TESTOSTERONE ; ESTROGENS
    Abstract: Epidemiological data show that reproductive and hormonal factors are involved in the etiology of endometrial cancer, but there is little data on the association with endogenous sex hormone levels. We analyzed the association between prediagnostic serum concentrations of sex steroids and endometrial cancer risk in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition using a nested case-control design of 247 incident endometrial cancer cases and 481 controls, matched on center, menopausal status, age, variables relating to blood collection, and, for premenopausal women, phase of menstrual cycle. Using conditional regression analysis, endometrial cancer risk among postmenopausal women was positively associated with increasing levels of total testosterone, free testosterone, estrone, total estradiol, and free estradiol. The odds ratios (ORs) for the highest versus lowest tertile were 2.66 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.50-4.72; P=0.002 for a continuous linear trend) for estrone, 2.07 (95% Cl 1.20-3.60; P=0.001) for estradiol, and 1.66 (95% Cl 0.98-2.82; P=0.001) for free estradiol. For total and free testosterone, ORs for the highest versus lowest tertile were 1.44 (95% Cl 0.88-2.36; P=0.05) and 2.05 (95% Cl 1.23-3.42; P=0.005) respectively. Androstenedione and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate were not associated with risk. Sex hormone-binding globulin was significantly inversely associated with risk (OR for the highest versus lowest tertile was 0.57, 95% Cl 0.34-0.95; P=0.004). In premenopausal women, serum sex hormone concentrations were not clearly associated with endometrial cancer risk, but numbers were too small to draw firm conclusions. In conclusion, relatively high blood concentrations of estrogens and free testosterone are associated with an increased endometrial cancer risk in postmenopausal women
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18509001
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