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  • 1
    Keywords: Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COHORT ; POPULATION ; TIME ; PATIENT ; ASSOCIATION ; AGE ; WOMEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; BETA ; DIET ; INDIVIDUALS ; time trends ; TRENDS ; EUROPE ; DENMARK ; BREAST-CANCER RISK ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; STANDARD ; ADULT ; RE ; DETERMINANTS ; BODY-SIZE ; HEIGHT ; PARTICIPANTS ; BIRTH ; body height ; menarche ; SECULAR TRENDS ; URINE ESTROGENS
    Abstract: In the last two centuries, age at menarche has decreased in several European populations, whereas adult height has increased. It is unclear whether these trends have ceased in recent years or how age at menarche and height are related in individuals. In this study, the authors first investigated trends in age at menarche and adult height among 286,205 women from nine European countries by computing the mean age at menarche and height in 5-year birth cohorts, adjusted for differences in socioeconomic status. Second, the relation between age at menarche and height was estimated by linear regression models, adjusted for age at enrollment between 1992 and 1998 and socioeconomic status. Mean age at menarche decreased by 44 days per 5-year birth cohort (beta = -0.12, standard error = 0.002), varying from 18 days in the United Kingdom to 58 days in Spain and Germany. Women grew 0.29 cm taller per 5-year birth cohort (standard error = 0.007), varying from 0.42 cm in Italy to 0.98 cm in Denmark. Furthermore, women grew approximately 0.31 cm taller when menarche occurred 1 year later (range by country: 0.13-0.50 cm). Based on time trends, more recent birth cohorts have their menarche earlier and grow taller. However, women with earlier menarche reach a shorter adult height compared with women who have menarche at a later age
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 16107566
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; Germany ; COHORT ; RISK ; MICE ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST-CANCER ; hormone ; AGE ; ovarian cancer ; OVARIAN-CANCER ; WOMEN ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; VALIDITY ; nutrition ; dehydroepiandrosterone ; POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN ; SERUM ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; DETERMINANTS ; development ; LEVEL ; case control studies ; SERUM-LEVELS ; SULFATE ; HORMONES ; DEHYDROEPIANDROSTERONE-SULFATE ; TESTOSTERONE ; prospective ; STEROID-HORMONES ; INCREASED RISK ; odds ratio ; CANCER-RISK ; OVARIAN ; BODY-MASS-INDEX
    Abstract: Few epidemiologic studies have examined the hypothesis that circulating androgens are involved in the development of ovarian cancer. We investigated the association between prediagnostic serum levels of androgens and sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and ovarian cancer risk in a case-control study nested within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort. One hundred and ninety-two ovarian cancer cases and 346 matched controls not using exogenous hormones at baseline blood donation were eligible for the study. Serum levels of testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and SHBG were measured by direct immunoassays. Free testosterone (fT) was calculated according to mass action laws. Multivariate conditional logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios adjusted for possible confounders. Overall, there was no association between serum concentrations of androgens or SHBG and ovarian cancer risk. In postmenopausal women, fT concentrations were inversely related to risk [highest versus lowest tertile odds ratio 0.45 (0.24-0.86); P-trend = 0-01]. Among women diagnosed before the age of 55 years, there was a negative association with SHBG and a positive association with fT and ovarian cancer risk, although these associations were not statistically significant. The present study suggests that circulating androgens and SHBG levels are not strongly associated with ovarian cancer risk, although levels of fT may be associated with an increased risk among women diagnosed at relatively young age. The heterogeneity of results on the associations of fT with ovarian cancer risk in postmenopausal women deserves further investigation
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17220328
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; CELLS ; AGENTS ; CELL ; MODEL ; MODELS ; neoplasms ; FOLLOW-UP ; SYSTEM ; COHORT ; cohort study ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; HISTORY ; incidence ; RISK ; INFECTION ; MECHANISM ; primary ; RISK-FACTORS ; mechanisms ; T cell ; T-CELL ; ASSOCIATION ; DISORDER ; SUSCEPTIBILITY ; NO ; LYMPHOMA ; CARE ; DESIGN ; PLASMA ; AGE ; WOMEN ; etiology ; MEN ; risk factors ; leukemia ; Jun ; diabetes ; ABNORMALITIES ; INFECTIONS ; EPIC ; nutrition ; immunosuppression ; non-hodgkin's lymphoma ; CHRONIC LYMPHOCYTIC-LEUKEMIA ; MULTIPLE-MYELOMA ; VIRAL-INFECTION ; insulin ; MELLITUS ; AGENT ; AUTOIMMUNITY ; multiple myeloma ; DISORDERS ; MEDICAL HISTORY ; INCREASE ; T-CELL LYMPHOMA ; prospective studies ; methods ; SUBTYPES ; metabolic syndrome ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; prospective ; prospective study ; RISK-FACTOR ; CANCERS ; B-CELL ; ENGLAND ; ENVIRONMENTAL-FACTORS ; host ; INCREASES ; viral ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; non-Hodgkin ; neoplasm ; INTERLEUKIN-6 GENE
    Abstract: Background Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of neoplasms arising from the lymphopoietic system including a wide range of subtypes of either B-cell or T-cell lymphomas. The few established risk factors for the development of these neoplasms include viral infections and immunological abnormalities, but their etiology remains largely unknown. Evidence suggests that certain medical conditions may be linked, through immunosuppression, to the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Multiple myeloma is a neoplasm of plasma cells that accounts for approximately 15% of lymphopoietic cancers. Increases in the incidence of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma in the past implicate environmental factors as potential causal agents. Design and Methods In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), 1,213 histologically confirmed incident cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and multiple myeloma (594 men; 619 women) were identified during a follow-up of 8.5 years. Cox proportional hazard models were used to explore the association between self-reported diabetes, diagnosed after 30 years of age, and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma overall and multiple myeloma and various lymphoma subtypes. Results We found no association between a personal history of diabetes and the risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma overall in men (HR: 1.28, 95% CI: 0.89-1.84), in women (HR: 0.71, 95% CI: 0.41-1.24), or in men and women combined (HR: 1.09, 95% CI: 0.80-1.47). Among the B-non-Hodgkin's lymphoma subtypes, we observed a statistically significant increased risk of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (HR: 2.0, 95% CI: 1.04-3.86) in men, but not in women (HR: 1.07, 95% CI: 0.33-3.43). Conclusions This prospective study did not provide evidence for a role of self-reported diabetes in the etiology of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma overall or multiple myeloma. We found an increased risk of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia among men with diabetes, but not among women. We hypothesize that diabetes may not play a causal role in the etiology of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, though the underlying pathogenic mechanisms of both disorders may include shared genetic, host and/or environmental susceptibility factors
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18443270
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; human ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; SUPPORT ; DEATH ; RISK ; RISKS ; TIME ; INDEX ; ASSOCIATION ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; RECRUITMENT ; PREDICTION ; ALCOHOL ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; EUROPE ; RELATIVE RISK ; BODIES ; REGRESSION ; WEIGHT ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; HEIGHT ; LEVEL ; analysis ; methods ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; ALL-CAUSE MORTALITY ; alcohol consumption ; USA ; prospective ; BMI ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; TISSUE DISTRIBUTION ; MEDICINE ; NOV ; body mass ; RATIO ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; PREDICTING MORTALITY ; ROC CURVE
    Abstract: BACKGROUND Previous studies have relied predominantly on the body-mass index (BMI, the weight in kilograms divided by the square of the height in meters) to assess the association of adiposity with the risk of death, but few have examined whether the distribution of body fat contributes to the prediction of death. METHODS We examined the association of BMI, waist circumference, and waist-to-hip ratio with the risk of death among 359,387 participants from nine countries in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). We used a Cox regression analysis, with age as the time variable, and stratified the models according to study center and age at recruitment, with further adjustment for educational level, smoking status, alcohol consumption, physical activity, and height. RESULTS During a mean follow-up of 9.7 years, 14,723 participants died. The lowest risks of death related to BMI were observed at a BMI of 25.3 for men and 24.3 for women. After adjustment for BMI, waist circumference and waist-to-hip ratio were strongly associated with the risk of death. Relative risks among men and women in the highest quintile of waist circumference were 2.05 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.80 to 2.33) and 1.78 (95% CI, 1.56 to 2.04), respectively, and in the highest quintile of waist-to-hip ratio, the relative risks were 1.68 (95% CI, 1.53 to 1.84) and 1.51 (95% CI, 1.37 to 1.66), respectively. BMI remained significantly associated with the risk of death in models that included waist circumference or waist-to-hip ratio (P〈0.001). CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that both general adiposity and abdominal adiposity are associated with the risk of death and support the use of waist circumference or waist-tohip ratio in addition to BMI in assessing the risk of death
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19005195
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  • 5
    Keywords: ENERGIES ; CANCER ; Germany ; MODEL ; MODELS ; PROSTATE ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; COHORT ; RISK ; RISKS ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; HEALTH ; PLASMA ; ENERGY ; AGE ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; smoking ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; ethanol ; MULTIVARIATE ; RECRUITMENT ; ALCOHOL ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; RELATIVE RISK ; ONCOLOGY ; WEIGHT ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; HEIGHT ; biomarker ; USA ; cancer research ; RISK-FACTOR ; MIDDLE-AGED MEN ; energy intake ; WINE ; BEVERAGES
    Abstract: Alcohol is a risk factor for several types of cancer. However, the results for prostate cancer have been inconsistent, with most studies showing no association. Within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition, detailed information were collected from 142,607 male participants on the intake of alcoholic beverages at recruitment (for 100% of the cohort) and over lifetime (for 76% of the cohort) between 1992 and 2000. During a median follow-up of 8.7 years, 2,655 prostate cancer cases were observed. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association of alcohol consumption at recruitment and average lifetime alcohol consumption with prostate cancer adjusted for age, center, smoking, height, weight, physical activity, and nonalcohol energy intake. Overall, neither alcohol consumption at baseline nor average lifetime alcohol consumption was associated with the risk for prostate cancer in this cohort of men. Men who consumed 〉= 60 g alcohol per day had a relative risk of 0.88 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.72-1.081 compared with men with an intake of 0.1-4.9 g/d; the respective relative risk for average lifetime intake was 1.09 (95% CI, 0.86-1.39). For advanced prostate cancer (n=537), the relative risks for 〉= 60 and 0.1-4.9 g alcohol per day at baseline were 0.98 (95% CI, 0.66-1.44) and 1.28 (95% CI, 0.79-2-07), respectively, for average lifetime intake. No statistically significant association was observed for alcohol intake from specific alcoholic beverages. Our results indicate no association between the consumption of alcohol and prostate cancer in this cohort of European men
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18483352
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  • 6
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; EXPOSURE ; POPULATION ; RISK ; MECHANISM ; REDUCTION ; RISK-FACTORS ; CARCINOGENESIS ; mechanisms ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; HEALTH ; NUMBER ; AGE ; WOMEN ; risk factors ; REQUIRES ; RISK FACTOR ; ORAL-CONTRACEPTIVES ; EPIC ; nutrition ; ENDOMETRIAL CANCER ; menopause ; ONCOLOGY ; LIFE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; ESTROGEN ; PREGNANCY ; BIRTH ; parity ; prospective ; menarche ; VARIABLES ; CANCER-RISK ; OVARIAN ; CORPUS ; oral contraceptive
    Abstract: Endometrial cancer risk has been associated with reproductive factors (age at menarche, age at menopause, parity, age at first and last birth, time since last birth and use of oral contraceptives (OCs)]. However, these factors are closely interrelated and whether they act independently still requires clarification. We conducted a study to examine the association of menstrual and reproductive variables with the risk of endometrial cancer among the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Among the 302,618 women eligible for the study, 1,017 incident endometrial cancer cases were identified. A reduction in endometrial cancer risk was observed in women with late menarche, early menopause, past OC use, high parity and a shorter time since last full-term pregnancy (FTP). No association was observed for duration of breast feeding after adjustment for number of FTP or for abortion (spontaneous or induced). After mutual adjustment, late age at menarche, early age at menopause and duration of OC use showed similar risk reductions of 7-8% per year of menstrual life, whereas the decreased risk associated with cumulative duration of FTPs was stronger (22% per year). In conclusion, our findings confirmed a reduction in risk of endometrial cancer with factors associated with a lower cumulative exposure to estrogen and/or higher exposure to progesterone, such as increasing number of FTPs and shorter menstrual lifespan and, therefore, support an important role of hormonal mechanisms in endometrial carcinogenesis
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19924816
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  • 7
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; POPULATION ; INTERVENTION ; ASSOCIATION ; PATTERNS ; DESIGN ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; DIET ; FAT ; BLOOD-PRESSURE ; ALCOHOL ; PROJECT ; CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; SMOKERS ; CALIBRATION ; MANAGEMENT ; physical activity ; ASSOCIATIONS ; PATTERN ; WEIGHT ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; LOW-CARBOHYDRATE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; dietary patterns ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; prospective ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; WEIGHT CHANGE ; RANDOMIZED CLINICAL-TRIAL ; Lead ; Follow up ; weight gain ; OBESE ADULTS ; PLASMA LEPTIN ; PROTEIN DIET
    Abstract: Background: Meat intake may be related to weight gain because of its high energy and fat content. Some observational studies have shown that meat consumption is positively associated with weight gain, but intervention studies have shown mixed results. Objective: Our objective was to assess the association between consumption of total meat, red meat, poultry, and processed meat and weight gain after 5 y of follow-up, on average, in the large European population who participated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Physical Activity, Nutrition, Alcohol, Cessation of Smoking, Eating Out of Home and Obesity (EPIC-PANACEA) project. Design: A total of 103,455 men and 270,348 women aged 25-70 y were recruited between 1992 and 2000 in 10 European countries. Diet was assessed at baseline with the use of country-specific validated questionnaires. A dietary calibration study was conducted in a representative subsample of the cohort. Weight and height were measured at baseline and self-reported at follow-up in most centers. Associations between energy from meat (kcal/d) and annual weight change (g/y) were assessed with the use of linear mixed models, controlled for age, sex, total energy intake, physical activity, dietary patterns, and other potential confounders. Results: Total meat consumption was positively associated with weight gain in men and women, in normal-weight and overweight subjects, and in smokers and nonsmokers. With adjustment for estimated energy intake, an increase in meat intake of 250 g/d (eg, one steak at approximate to 450 kcal) would lead to a 2-kg higher weight gain after 5 y (95% CI: 1.5, 2.7 kg). Positive associations were observed for red meat, poultry, and processed meat. Conclusion: Our results suggest that a decrease in meat consumption may improve weight management. Am J Clin Nutr 2010; 92: 398-407
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20592131
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; BLOOD ; COMMON ; COHORT ; RISK ; GENE ; TIME ; MARKER ; primary ; GENETIC POLYMORPHISMS ; ASSOCIATION ; polymorphism ; POLYMORPHISMS ; single nucleotide polymorphism ; ACID ; NO ; HEALTH ; PLASMA ; AGE ; etiology ; cancer risk ; case-control studies ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; GASTRIC-CANCER ; nutrition ; STOMACH-CANCER ; SINGLE ; DEFICIENCY ; ONCOLOGY ; case control study ; case-control study ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; VARIANT ; INCREASE ; SINGLE NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS ; prospective studies ; gastric cancer ; METHYLENETETRAHYDROFOLATE REDUCTASE ; MTHFR ; LEVEL ; biomarker ; case control studies ; HELICOBACTER-PYLORI INFECTION ; GENOTYPE ; LOCUS ; single-nucleotide ; USA ; C677T POLYMORPHISM ; prospective ; prospective study ; INCREASED RISK ; odds ratio ; cancer research ; CANCER-RISK ; CHINESE POPULATION ; nested case-control study ; case control ; LOGISTIC-REGRESSION ; MENDELIAN RANDOMIZATION ; PLASMA-CONCENTRATION ; chronic atrophic gastritis ; gastric ; pepsinogen ; MTHFR POLYMORPHISMS ; 5,10-METHYLENETETRAHYDROFOLATE REDUCTASE ; EPIC-EURGAST ; MICROBIOLOGICAL ASSAY
    Abstract: Previous studies have shown inconsistent associations of folate intake and polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) gene with gastric cancer risk. Our nested case-control study within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition cohort is the first prospective study of blood folate levels and gastric cancer. Gastric cancer cases (n = 247) and controls (n = 631) were matched for study center, age, sex, and time of blood donation. Two common single nucleotide polymorphisms of the MTHFR gene were determined, as were plasma concentrations of folate, cobalamin (vitamin B12), total homocysteine, and methylmalonic acid (cobalamin deficiency marker) in prediagnostic plasma. Risk measures were calculated with conditional logistic regression. Although no relations were observed between plasma folate or total homocysteine concentrations and gastric cancer, we observed a trend toward lower risk of gastric cancer with increasing cobalamin concentrations (odds ratio, 0.79 per SD increase in cobalamin; P = 0.01). Further analyses showed that the inverse association between cobalamin and gastric cancer was confined to cancer cases with low pepsinogen A levels (marker of severe chronic atrophic gastritis) at the time of blood sampling. The 677 C -〉 T MTHFR polymorphism was not associated with gastric cancer, but we observed an increased risk with the variant genotype of the 1298 A -〉 C polymorphism (odds ratio, 1.47 for CC versus AA; P = 0.04). In conclusion, we found no evidence of a role of folate in gastric cancer etiology. However, we observed increased gastric cancer risk at low cobalamin levels that was most likely due to compromised cobalamin status in atrophic gastritis preceding gastric cancer
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18006931
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; human ; PROSTATE ; FOLLOW-UP ; DISEASE ; RISK ; TIME ; INDEX ; BIOMARKERS ; ASSOCIATION ; HEALTH ; AGE ; MEN ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; prostate cancer ; PROSTATE-CANCER ; cancer risk ; RECRUITMENT ; UNITED-STATES ; INDIVIDUALS ; ALCOHOL ; ALCOHOL-CONSUMPTION ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; education ; RELATIVE RISK ; BODIES ; ONCOLOGY ; REGRESSION ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; HEIGHT ; GROWTH-FACTOR-I ; biomarker ; methods ; MASS ; FACTOR (IGF)-I ; alcohol consumption ; USA ; prospective ; HIGH-GRADE ; DIETARY ASSESSMENT METHODS ; BMI ; cancer research ; CANCER-RISK ; PREDICTS ; PREDICT ; NOV ; WEIGHT CHANGE ; body mass ; META-REGRESSION ANALYSIS ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer ; EPIC-OXFORD PARTICIPANTS ; HEALTH-PROFESSIONALS ; IGF BINDING PROTEIN-3
    Abstract: Background: Body size has been hypothesized to influence the risk of prostate cancer; however, most epidemiologic studies have relied on body mass index (BMI) to assess adiposity, whereas only a few studies have examined whether body fat distribution predicts prostate cancer. Methods: We examined the association of height, BMI, waist and hip circumference, and waist-hip ratio with prostate cancer risk among 129,502 men without cancer at baseline from 8 countries of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), using Cox regression, with age as time metric, stratifying by study center and age at recruitment, and adjusting for education, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and physical activity. Results: During a mean follow-up of 8.5 years, 2,446 men developed prostate cancer. Waist circumference and waist-hip ratio were positively associated with risk of advanced disease. The relative risk of advanced prostate cancer was 1.06 (95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.1) per 5-cm-higher waist circumference and 1.21 (95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.39) per 0.1-unit-higher waist-hip ratio. When stratified by BMI, waist circumference and waist-hip ratio were positively related to risk of total, advanced, and high-grade prostate cancer among men with lower but not among those with higher BMI (P-interaction for waist with BMI, 0.25, 0.02, and 0.05, respectively; P-interaction for waist-hip ratio with BMI, 0.27, 0.22, and 0.14; respectively). Conclusions: These data suggest that abdominal adiposity may be associated with an increased risk of advanced prostate cancer. This association may be stronger among individuals with lower BMI; however, this finding needs confirmation in future studies. (Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 2008;17(11):3252-61)
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 18990768
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  • 10
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; CELL ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; RISK ; PROTEIN ; INDEX ; RISK-FACTORS ; ASSOCIATION ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; smoking ; FIBER ; cholesterol ; DIET ; case-control studies ; ALCOHOL ; EPIC ; nutrition ; CALIBRATION ; NUTRIENTS ; physical activity ; CELL CARCINOMA ; renal cell carcinoma ; case-control study ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; prospective studies ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; USA ; dietary intake ; prospective ; prospective study ; INCREASED RISK ; carbohydrate ; FOODS ; KIDNEY CANCER ; macronutrients ; VITAMIN
    Abstract: Previous case-control studies have suggested that a high intake of animal foods and its associated nutrients are associated with an increased risk of renal cell carcinoma, although data from prospective studies are limited. We report here on the relationship between macronutrient intake and renal cell carcinoma incidence among 435,293 participants enrolled in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition. Cox proportional hazard models were used to examine the association of dietary intake of fat, protein, carbohydrate, fiber and cholesterol and risk of renal cell carcinoma adjusted for age, sex, center, height, body mass index, physical activity, education, smoking, menopausal status, alcohol and energy intake. During an average 8.8 years of follow-up, 507 renal cell carcinoma cases occurred. Risk of renal cell carcinoma was not associated with macronutrient intake, including nutrients derived from animal sources. Our results indicate that macronutrient intake is not associated with risk of renal cell carcinoma in this cohort of European men and women. (C) 2009 UICC
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19415751
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