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  • 1
    Keywords: CANCER ; Germany ; EXPOSURE ; POPULATION ; RISK ; MECHANISM ; REDUCTION ; RISK-FACTORS ; CARCINOGENESIS ; mechanisms ; ASSOCIATION ; BREAST ; HEALTH ; NUMBER ; AGE ; WOMEN ; risk factors ; REQUIRES ; RISK FACTOR ; ORAL-CONTRACEPTIVES ; EPIC ; nutrition ; ENDOMETRIAL CANCER ; menopause ; ONCOLOGY ; LIFE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; ESTROGEN ; PREGNANCY ; BIRTH ; parity ; prospective ; menarche ; VARIABLES ; CANCER-RISK ; OVARIAN ; CORPUS ; oral contraceptive
    Abstract: Endometrial cancer risk has been associated with reproductive factors (age at menarche, age at menopause, parity, age at first and last birth, time since last birth and use of oral contraceptives (OCs)]. However, these factors are closely interrelated and whether they act independently still requires clarification. We conducted a study to examine the association of menstrual and reproductive variables with the risk of endometrial cancer among the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Among the 302,618 women eligible for the study, 1,017 incident endometrial cancer cases were identified. A reduction in endometrial cancer risk was observed in women with late menarche, early menopause, past OC use, high parity and a shorter time since last full-term pregnancy (FTP). No association was observed for duration of breast feeding after adjustment for number of FTP or for abortion (spontaneous or induced). After mutual adjustment, late age at menarche, early age at menopause and duration of OC use showed similar risk reductions of 7-8% per year of menstrual life, whereas the decreased risk associated with cumulative duration of FTPs was stronger (22% per year). In conclusion, our findings confirmed a reduction in risk of endometrial cancer with factors associated with a lower cumulative exposure to estrogen and/or higher exposure to progesterone, such as increasing number of FTPs and shorter menstrual lifespan and, therefore, support an important role of hormonal mechanisms in endometrial carcinogenesis
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19924816
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  • 2
    Keywords: BREAST-CANCER ; PATTERNS ; AGE ; nutrition ; METAANALYSIS ; pooled analysis ; FAMILY-HISTORY ; TUBAL-LIGATION ; HYSTERECTOMY ; ASSOCIATION CONSORTIUM
    Abstract: BACKGROUND: Ovarian cancer has a high case-fatality ratio, largely due to late diagnosis. Epidemiologic risk prediction models could help identify women at increased risk who may benefit from targeted prevention measures, such as screening or chemopreventive agents. METHODS: We built an ovarian cancer risk prediction model with epidemiologic risk factors from 202 206 women in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition study. RESULTS: Older age at menopause, longer duration of hormone replacement therapy, and higher body mass index were included as increasing ovarian cancer risk, whereas unilateral ovariectomy, longer duration of oral contraceptive use, and higher number of full-term pregnancies were decreasing risk. The discriminatory power (overall concordance index) of this model, as examined with five-fold cross-validation, was 0.64 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57, 0.70). The ratio of the expected to observed number of ovarian cancer cases occurring in the first 5 years of follow-up was 0.90 (293 out of 324, 95% CI: 0.81-1.01), in general there was no evidence for miscalibration. CONCLUSION: Our ovarian cancer risk model containing only epidemiological data showed modest discriminatory power for a Western European population. Future studies should consider adding informative biomarkers to possibly improve the predictive ability of the model.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25742479
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