Your email was sent successfully. Check your inbox.

An error occurred while sending the email. Please try again.

Proceed reservation?

Export
  • 1
    Keywords: LUNG-CANCER ; SUSCEPTIBILITY LOCUS ; NECK-CANCER ; pooled analysis ; FAMILY-HISTORY ; ALCOHOL-DRINKING ; EPIDEMIOLOGY CONSORTIUM ; INTERNATIONAL HEAD ; SENSITIVITY PROTEIN MUS308 ; TOBACCO-RELATED CANCERS
    Abstract: Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have been successful in identifying common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to etiologically complex disease. We conducted a GWAS to identify common genetic variation involved in susceptibility to upper aero-digestive tract (UADT) cancers. Genome-wide genotyping was carried out using the Illumina HumanHap300 beadchips in 2,091 UADT cancer cases and 3,513 controls from two large European multi-centre UADT cancer studies, as well as 4,821 generic controls. The 19 top-ranked variants were investigated further in an additional 6,514 UADT cancer cases and 7,892 controls of European descent from an additional 13 UADT cancer studies participating in the INHANCE consortium. Five common variants presented evidence for significant association in the combined analysis (p 〈= 5 x 10(-7)). Two novel variants were identified, a 4q21 variant (rs1494961, p = 1 x 10(-8)) located near DNA repair related genes HEL308 and FAM175A (or Abraxas) and a 12q24 variant (rs4767364, p = 2 x 10(-8)) located in an extended linkage disequilibrium region that contains multiple genes including the aldehyde dehydrogenase 2 (ALDH2) gene. Three remaining variants are located in the ADH gene cluster and were identified previously in a candidate gene study involving some of these samples. The association between these three variants and UADT cancers was independently replicated in 5,092 UADT cancer cases and 6,794 controls non-overlapping samples presented here (rs1573496-ADH7, p = 5 x 10(-8); rs1229984-ADH1B, p = 7 x 10(-9); and rs698-ADH1C, p = 0.02). These results implicate two variants at 4q21 and 12q24 and further highlight three ADH variants in UADT cancer susceptibility
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21437268
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
  • 2
    Keywords: CIGARETTE-SMOKING ; HUMAN-PAPILLOMAVIRUS ; ORAL-CANCER ; UPPER AERODIGESTIVE TRACT ; occupational exposures ; ALCOHOL-DRINKING ; SOCIOECONOMIC INEQUALITIES ; EPIDEMIOLOGY CONSORTIUM ; INTERNATIONAL HEAD ; OROPHARYNGEAL-CANCER
    Abstract: Low socioeconomic status has been reported to be associated with head and neck cancer risk. However, previous studies have been too small to examine the associations by cancer subsite, age, sex, global region and calendar time and to explain the association in terms of behavioral risk factors. Individual participant data of 23,964 cases with head and neck cancer and 31,954 controls from 31 studies in 27 countries pooled with random effects models. Overall, low education was associated with an increased risk of head and neck cancer (OR = 2.50; 95% CI = 2.02 - 3.09). Overall one-third of the increased risk was not explained by differences in the distribution of cigarette smoking and alcohol behaviors; and it remained elevated among never users of tobacco and nondrinkers (OR = 1.61; 95% CI = 1.13 - 2.31). More of the estimated education effect was not explained by cigarette smoking and alcohol behaviors: in women than in men, in older than younger groups, in the oropharynx than in other sites, in South/Central America than in Europe/North America and was strongest in countries with greater income inequality. Similar findings were observed for the estimated effect of low versus high household income. The lowest levels of income and educational attainment were associated with more than 2-fold increased risk of head and neck cancer, which is not entirely explained by differences in the distributions of behavioral risk factors for these cancers and which varies across cancer sites, sexes, countries and country income inequality levels. What's new? Head and neck cancer is among the most common and increasing cancers in the world. Besides smoking, alcohol drinking, and human papilloma virus infections, low socioeconomic status has been implicated as one of the most important risk factors for this cancer type. This large multinational study authoritatively confirmed that lower education status and lower income are associated with increased risk for head and neck cancer development. Smoking and alcohol consumption could not entirely explain the risk associated with low socioeconomic factors, and therefore, as the authors argue, need to be more explicitly recognized in the etiology associated with head and neck cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 24996155
    Signatur Availability
    BibTip Others were also interested in ...
Close ⊗
This website uses cookies and the analysis tool Matomo. More information can be found here...