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  • ASSOCIATION  (13)
  • CALIBRATION  (9)
  • ALCOHOL  (7)
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  • 1
    Keywords: ASSOCIATION ; ACID ; score ; PATTERNS ; WOMEN ; MEN ; PROSPECTIVE COHORT ; FISH ; REGION ; DIET ; FAT ; INDIVIDUALS ; ALCOHOL ; CONSUMPTION ; FRUIT ; nutrition ; VEGETABLES ; HETEROGENEITY ; REGRESSION ; PRODUCTS ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; ADIPOSITY ; metabolic syndrome ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; USA ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; BMI ; FOODS ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; DAIRY-PRODUCTS ; EPIC-OXFORD PARTICIPANTS ; WEIGHT-LOSS ; Abdominal ; ABDOMINAL ADIPOSITY ; ELDERLY-PEOPLE ; HEALTH-STATUS ; TO-HIP RATIO
    Abstract: Given the lack of consistent evidence of the relationship between Mediterranean dietary patterns and body fat, we assessed the cross-sectional association between adherence to a modified Mediterranean diet, BMI, and waist circumference (WC). A total of 497,308 individuals (70.7% women) aged 25-70 y from 10 European countries participated in this study. Diet was assessed at baseline using detailed validated country-specific questionnaires, and anthropometrical measurements were collected using standardized procedures. The association between the degree of adherence to the modified-Mediterranean Diet Score (mMDS) (including high consumption of vegetables, legumes, fruits and nuts, cereals, fish and seafood, and unsaturated: saturated fatty acids ratio; moderate alcohol intake; and low consumption of meat and meat products and dairy products) and BMI (kg.m(-2)) or WC (cm was modeled through mixed-effects linear regression, controlling for potential confounders. Overall, the mMDS was not significantly associated with BMI. Higher adherence to the Mediterranean diet was significantly associated with lower WC, for a given BMI, in both men (-0.09; 95% CI -0.14 to -0.04) and women (-0.06; 95% CI -0.10 to -0.01). The association was stronger in men (-0.20; 95% CI -0.23 to -0.17) and women (-0.17; 95% CI -0.21 to -0.13) from Northern European countries. Despite the observed heterogeneity among regions, results of this study suggest that adherence to a modified Mediterranean diet, high in foods of vegetable origin and unsaturated fatty acids, is associated with lower abdominal adiposity measured by WC in European men and women. J. Nutr. 139: 1728-1737, 2009
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19571036
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  • 2
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; FOLLOW-UP ; COHORT ; POPULATION ; INTERVENTION ; ASSOCIATION ; PATTERNS ; DESIGN ; ENERGY ; AGE ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; smoking ; COUNTRIES ; DIET ; FAT ; BLOOD-PRESSURE ; ALCOHOL ; PROJECT ; CONSUMPTION ; nutrition ; SMOKERS ; CALIBRATION ; MANAGEMENT ; physical activity ; ASSOCIATIONS ; PATTERN ; WEIGHT ; ENERGY-INTAKE ; LOW-CARBOHYDRATE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; dietary patterns ; BODY-MASS INDEX ; prospective ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; WEIGHT CHANGE ; RANDOMIZED CLINICAL-TRIAL ; Lead ; Follow up ; weight gain ; OBESE ADULTS ; PLASMA LEPTIN ; PROTEIN DIET
    Abstract: Background: Meat intake may be related to weight gain because of its high energy and fat content. Some observational studies have shown that meat consumption is positively associated with weight gain, but intervention studies have shown mixed results. Objective: Our objective was to assess the association between consumption of total meat, red meat, poultry, and processed meat and weight gain after 5 y of follow-up, on average, in the large European population who participated in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition-Physical Activity, Nutrition, Alcohol, Cessation of Smoking, Eating Out of Home and Obesity (EPIC-PANACEA) project. Design: A total of 103,455 men and 270,348 women aged 25-70 y were recruited between 1992 and 2000 in 10 European countries. Diet was assessed at baseline with the use of country-specific validated questionnaires. A dietary calibration study was conducted in a representative subsample of the cohort. Weight and height were measured at baseline and self-reported at follow-up in most centers. Associations between energy from meat (kcal/d) and annual weight change (g/y) were assessed with the use of linear mixed models, controlled for age, sex, total energy intake, physical activity, dietary patterns, and other potential confounders. Results: Total meat consumption was positively associated with weight gain in men and women, in normal-weight and overweight subjects, and in smokers and nonsmokers. With adjustment for estimated energy intake, an increase in meat intake of 250 g/d (eg, one steak at approximate to 450 kcal) would lead to a 2-kg higher weight gain after 5 y (95% CI: 1.5, 2.7 kg). Positive associations were observed for red meat, poultry, and processed meat. Conclusion: Our results suggest that a decrease in meat consumption may improve weight management. Am J Clin Nutr 2010; 92: 398-407
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20592131
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  • 3
    Keywords: CANCER ; carcinoma ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; RISK ; ASSOCIATION ; bladder cancer ; BLADDER-CANCER ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; LIFE-STYLE ; FOOD FREQUENCY QUESTIONNAIRE ; COFFEE ; DRINKING-WATER ; RELATIVE VALIDITY ; FLUID ; LOWER URINARY-TRACT ; DISINFECTION BY-PRODUCTS ; urothelial cell carcinomas
    Abstract: Results from previous studies investigating the association between fluid intake and urothelial cell carcinomas (UCC) are inconsistent. We evaluated this association among 233,236 subjects in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC), who had adequate baseline information on water and total fluid intake. During a mean follow-up of 9.3 years, 513 first primary UCC occurred. At recruitment, habitual fluid intake was assessed by a food frequency questionnaire. Multivariable hazard ratios were estimated using Cox regression stratified by age, sex and center and adjusted for energy intake, smoking status, duration of smoking and lifetime intensity of smoking. When using the lowest tertile of intake as reference, total fluid intake was not associated with risk of all UCC (HR 1.12; 95% CI 0.86-1.45, p-trend = 0.42) or with risk of prognostically high-risk UCC (HR 1.28; 95% CI 0.85-1.93, p-trend = 0.27) or prognostically low-risk UCC (HR 0.93; 95% CI 0.65-1.33, p-trend = 0.74). No associations were observed between risk of UCC and intake of water, coffee, tea and herbal tea and milk and other dairy beverages. For prognostically low-risk UCC suggestions of an inverse association with alcoholic beverages and of a positive association with soft drinks were seen. Increased risks were found for all UCC and prognostically low-risk UCC with higher intake of fruit and vegetable juices. In conclusion, total usual fluid intake is not associated with UCC risk in EPIC. The relationships observed for some fluids may be due to chance, but further investigation of the role of all types of fluid is warranted
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 20715171
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  • 4
    Keywords: CANCER ; COMBINATION ; Germany ; EPIDEMIOLOGY ; POPULATION ; PROTEIN ; PROTEINS ; PHOSPHORUS ; WOMEN ; COUNTRIES ; FATTY-ACIDS ; DIETARY ; CALCIUM ; ALCOHOL ; CONSUMPTION ; EPIC ; nutrition ; CALIBRATION ; FOOD ; nutrient intake ; BETA-CAROTENE ; NUTRIENTS ; RETINOL ; RECALL ; EPIC PROJECT ; IRON ; dietary patterns ; VITAMINS ; RECALLS ; POTASSIUM ; vitamin D ; 24-h dietary recall ; VEGETABLE-OIL ; magnesium ; nutrient intakes ; food component intakes ; food group combinations ; reduced rank regression
    Abstract: Objective: To identify combinations of food groups that explain as much variation in absolute intakes of 23 key nutrients and food components as possible within the country-specific populations of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). Subjects/Methods: The analysis covered single 24-h dietary recalls (24-HDR) from 36 034 subjects (13 025 men and 23 009 women), aged 35-74 years, from all 10 countries participating in the EPIC study. In a set of 39 food groups, reduced rank regression (RRR) was used to identify those combinations (RRR factors) that explain the largest proportion of variation in intake of 23 key nutrients and food components, namely, proteins, saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, cholesterol, sugars (sum of mono-and disaccharides), starch, fibre, alcohol, calcium, iron, potassium, phosphorus, magnesium, vitamin D, beta-carotene, retinol and vitamins E, B1, B2, B6, B12 and C (RRR responses). Analyses were performed at the country level and for all countries combined. Results: In the country-specific analyses, the first RRR factor explained a considerable proportion of the total nutrient intake variation in all 10 countries (27.4-37.1%). The subsequent RRR factors were much less important in explaining the variation (〈= 6%). Strong similarities were observed for the first country-specific RRR factor between the individual countries, largely characterized by consumption of bread, vegetable oils, red meat, milk, cheese, potatoes, margarine and processed meat. The highest explained variation was seen for protein, potassium, phosphorus and magnesium (50-70%), whereas sugars, beta-carotene, retinol and alcohol were only marginally explained (〈= 5%). The explained proportion of the other nutrients ranged between these extremes. Conclusions: A combination of food groups was identified that explained a considerable proportion of the nutrient intake variation in 24-HDRs in every country-specific EPIC population in a similar manner. This indicates that, despite the large variability in food and nutrient intakes reported in the EPIC, the variance of intake of important nutrients is explained, to a large extent, by similar food group combinations across countries.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19888278
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  • 5
    Keywords: CANCER ; COHORT ; ACIDS ; OBESITY ; VALIDITY ; PROJECT ; CALIBRATION ; ADULTS ; PARTICIPANTS ; CUTOFF
    Abstract: Fish consumption is the major dietary source of EPA and DHA, which according to rodent experiments may reduce body fat mass and prevent obesity. Only a few human studies have investigated the association between fish consumption and body-weight gain. We investigated the association between fish consumption and subsequent change in body weight. Women and men (n 344 757) participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition were followed for a median of 5.0 years. Linear and logistic regression were used to investigate the associations between fish consumption and subsequent change in body weight. Among women, the annual weight change was 5.70 (95% CI 4.35, 7.06), 2.23 (95% CI 0.16, 4.31) and 11.12 (95% CI 8.17, 14.08) g/10 g higher total, lean and fatty fish consumption per d, respectively. The OR of becoming overweight in 5 years among women who were normal weight at enrolment was 1.02 (95% CI 1.01, 1.02), 1.01 (95% CI 1.00, 1.02) and 1.02 (95% CI 1.01, 1.04) g/10 g higher total, lean and fatty consumption per d, respectively. Among men, fish consumption was not statistically significantly associated with weight change. Adjustment for potential over-or underestimation of fish consumption did not systematically change the observed associations, but the 95% CI became wider. The results in subgroups from analyses stratified by age or BMI at enrolment were not systematically different. In conclusion, the present study suggests that fish consumption has no appreciable association with body-weight gain.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 22716915
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  • 6
    Keywords: POPULATION ; HEALTH ; WOMEN ; VALIDITY ; CALIBRATION ; METAANALYSIS ; PREMENOPAUSAL ; CAFFEINE CONSUMPTION ; SEX-HORMONE CONCENTRATIONS ; DECAFFEINATED COFFEE
    Abstract: INTRODUCTION: Specific coffee subtypes and tea may impact risk of pre- and post-menopausal breast cancer differently. We investigated the association between coffee (total, caffeinated, decaffeinated) and tea intake and risk of breast cancer. METHODS: A total of 335,060 women participating in the European Prospective Investigation into Nutrition and Cancer (EPIC) Study, completed a dietary questionnaire from 1992 to 2000, and were followed-up until 2010 for incidence of breast cancer. Hazard ratios (HR) of breast cancer by country-specific, as well as cohort-wide categories of beverage intake were estimated. RESULTS: During an average follow-up of 11 years, 1064 premenopausal, and 9134 postmenopausal breast cancers were diagnosed. Caffeinated coffee intake was associated with lower risk of postmenopausal breast cancer: adjusted HR = 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.82 to 0.98, for high versus low consumption; P trend = 0.029. While there was no significant effect modification by hormone receptor status (P = 0.711), linear trend for lower risk of breast cancer with increasing caffeinated coffee intake was clearest for estrogen and progesterone receptor negative (ER-PR-), postmenopausal breast cancer (P = 0.008). For every 100 ml increase in caffeinated coffee intake, the risk of ER-PR- breast cancer was lower by 4% (adjusted HR: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.93 to 1.00). Non-consumers of decaffeinated coffee had lower risk of postmenopausal breast cancer (adjusted HR = 0.89; 95% CI: 0.80 to 0.99) compared to low consumers, without evidence of dose-response relationship (P trend = 0.128). Exclusive decaffeinated coffee consumption was not related to postmenopausal breast cancer risk, compared to any decaffeinated-low caffeinated intake (adjusted HR = 0.97; 95% CI: 0.82 to 1.14), or to no intake of any coffee (HR: 0.96; 95%: 0.82 to 1.14). Caffeinated and decaffeinated coffee were not associated with premenopausal breast cancer. Tea intake was neither associated with pre- nor post-menopausal breast cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Higher caffeinated coffee intake may be associated with lower risk of postmenopausal breast cancer. Decaffeinated coffee intake does not seem to be associated with breast cancer.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25637171
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  • 7
    Keywords: POPULATION ; ASSOCIATION ; ENERGY ; OBESITY ; FOOD ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; WEIGHT-GAIN ; OF-HOME ; 24-HOUR RECALL ; RESTAURANT
    Abstract: Eating out has been linked to the current obesity epidemic, but the evaluation of the extent to which out of home (OH) dietary intakes are different from those at home (AH) is limited. Data collected among 8849 men and 14 277 women aged 35-64 years from the general population of eleven European countries through 24-h dietary recalls or food diaries were analysed to: (1) compare food consumption OH to those AH; (2) describe the characteristics of substantial OH eaters, defined as those who consumed 25 % or more of their total daily energy intake at OH locations. Logistic regression models were fit to identify personal characteristics associated with eating out. In both sexes, beverages, sugar, desserts, sweet and savoury bakery products were consumed more OH than AH. In some countries, men reported higher intakes of fish OH than AH. Overall, substantial OH eating was more common among men, the younger and the more educated participants, but was weakly associated with total energy intake. The substantial OH eaters reported similar dietary intakes OH and AH. Individuals who were not identified as substantial OH eaters reported consuming proportionally higher quantities of sweet and savoury bakery products, soft drinks, juices and other non-alcoholic beverages OH than AH. The OH intakes were different from the AH ones, only among individuals who reported a relatively small contribution of OH eating to their daily intakes and this may partly explain the inconsistent findings relating eating out to the current obesity epidemic.
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 25907775
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  • 8
    Keywords: CANCER ; SURVIVAL ; MODEL ; FOLLOW-UP ; INFORMATION ; COHORT ; DEATH ; DISEASE ; incidence ; MORTALITY ; POPULATION ; RISK ; HEART ; PATIENT ; prognosis ; REDUCTION ; ASSOCIATION ; NO ; TRIAL ; TRIALS ; HEALTH ; AGE ; COUNTRIES ; POPULATIONS ; DIET ; DIETARY ; NETHERLANDS ; MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION ; ALCOHOL ; IMPROVES ; EPIC ; European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ; nutrition ; FOOD ; HEART-DISEASE ; Mediterranean diet ; HETEROGENEITY ; REGRESSION ; ASSOCIATIONS ; PATTERN ; CORONARY-HEART-DISEASE ; INTERVAL ; elderly ; prospective ; PEOPLE ; UNIT ; COMMUNITY ; myocardial infarction ; coronary heart disease ; DEATHS
    Abstract: Mediterranean diet is associated with lower incidence of coronary heart disease, and two randomised trials indicated that it improves prognosis of coronary patients. These trials, however, relied on a total of 100 deaths and evaluated designer diets in the clinical context. We have evaluated the association of adherence to the modified Mediterranean diet, in which unsaturates were substituted for monounsaturates, with survival among elderly with previous myocardial infarction within the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and nutrition (EPIC) study. As of December 2003, after a median follow-up of 6.7 years, 2671 EPIC participants from nine countries were 60 years or older and had prevalent myocardial infarction but no stroke or cancer at enrolment, complete information on dietary intakes and important covariates and known survival status. Adherence to the modified Mediterranean diet was assessed through a 10-unit-scale. Mortality ratio in relation to modified Mediterranean diet was estimated through Cox regression controlling for possible confounding. Increased adherence to modified Mediterranean diet by two units was associated with 18% lower overall mortality rate (95% confidence interval 7-27%, fixed effects model). There was no significant heterogeneity by sex, age at enrolment, or country, although the association tended to be less evident among northern Europeans. Associations between food groups contributing to the modified Mediterranean diet and mortality were generally weak. A diet inspired by the Mediterranean pattern that can be easily adopted by Western populations is associated with substantial reduction of total mortality of coronary patients in the community
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 17926134
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  • 9
    Keywords: CANCER ; MODEL ; MODELS ; COHORT ; BODY-WEIGHT ; ASSOCIATION ; WOMEN ; MEN ; OBESITY ; smoking ; EPIC ; nutrition ; EUROPE ; LEISURE-TIME ; physical activity ; ADULTS ; REGRESSION ; WEIGHT ; fat distribution ; ADIPOSITY ; OVERWEIGHT ; prospective ; EUROPEAN COUNTRIES ; BMI ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; ENERGY-EXPENDITURE ; BODY-COMPOSITION ; INVESTIGATE ; cross-sectional analysis ; OXFORD PARTICIPANTS ; WEIGHT-GAIN
    Abstract: Objectives: Cross-sectional data suggest a strong association between low levels of physical activity and obesity. The EPIC-PANACEA ( European Prospective Investigation into Cancer-Physical Activity, Nutrition, Alcohol, Cessation of Smoking, Eating out of home And obesity) project was designed to investigate the associations between physical activity and body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference based on individual data collected across nine European countries. Methods: In the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition ( EPIC), 519 931 volunteers were recruited between 1992 and 2000, of whom 405 819 had data on main variables of interest. Height, body weight and waist circumference were measured using standardized procedures. Physical activity was assessed using a validated four-category index reflecting a self-reported usual activity during work and leisure time. The associations between physical activity and BMI and waist circumference were estimated using multilevel mixed effects linear regression models, adjusted for age, total energy intake, smoking status, alcohol consumption and educational level. Results: A total of 125 629 men and 280 190 women with a mean age of 52.9 (s.d. 9.7) and 51.5 (s.d. 10.0) years, respectively were included. The mean BMI was 26.6 kg/m(2) (s.d. 3.6) in men and 25.0 kg/m(2) (s.d. 4.5) in women. Fifty percent of men and 30% of women were categorized as being active or moderately active. A one-category difference in the physical activity index was inversely associated with a difference of 0.18 kg/m(2) in the mean BMI (95% confidence interval, CI, 0.11, 0.24) and 1.04-cm (95% CI 0.82, 1.26) difference in waist circumference in men. The equivalent figures for women were 0.31 kg/m(2) (95% CI 0.23, 0.38) and 0.90 cm ( 95% CI 0.71, 1.08), respectively. Conclusions: Physical activity is inversely associated with both BMI and waist circumference across nine European countries. Although we cannot interpret the association causally, our results were observed in a large and diverse cohort independently from many potential confounders
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 19223851
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  • 10
    Keywords: smoking ; ALCOHOL ; CONSUMPTION ; DIETARY-INTAKE ; PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY ; BMI ; RISK-FACTOR ; BODY-FAT DISTRIBUTION ; WAIST CIRCUMFERENCE ; androgens ; TO-HIP RATIO ; Waist-to-hip ratio ; FRENCH MEN ; multi-centric cohort study
    Abstract: Background/Objectives: The relation between lifetime use of alcohol and measures of abdominal and general adiposity is unknown. Subjects/Methods: Among 99 381 men and 158 796 women of the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC) study, means of waist circumference (WC), waist-to-hip-ratio (WHR) and body mass index (BMI), and odds ratios (OR) for a larger WC than predicted for a given BMI (WClp = positive residuals of gender specific linear regression of BMI on WC) across categories of average lifetime use of alcohol (total, from wine and from beer) were calculated, all adjusted for socio-demographic, lifestyle and health factors. Results: WC, WHR and BMI in men using lifetime 〈= 6 g/d alcohol were 95.1 cm, 0.942 and 27.3 kg/m(2), and 96.2 cm, 0.961 and 28.3 kg/m(2) when using 496 g/d. WC and WHR in women was 83.2 cm and 0.813 for 〈= 6 g/d, and 84.6 cm and 0.830 for 460 g/d, whereas BMI deviated only slightly with the lowest BMI (26.7 kg/m(2)) observed for 46-24 g/d. Compared with 〈= 6 g/d, OR for a WClp in both genders increased steadily across categories of alcohol use (up to 1.40 (95% confidence interval 1.32, 1.49) in men using 〉60 g/d and 1.63 (1.54, 1.73) in women using 〉24 g/d), though increase was higher for alcohol from beer than from wine (P for difference between beer and wine 〈0.001 (men) and = 0.002 (women)). Conclusion: Lifetime alcohol use is positively related to abdominal and general adiposity in men, possibly following the male weight gain pattern; in women, it is positively related only to abdominal adiposity. In this context, beer may contribute additionally to abdominal adiposity. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition
    Type of Publication: Journal article published
    PubMed ID: 21559044
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